#[email protected]%*ing army worms!!
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
t-roy 28-Sep-21
t-roy 28-Sep-21
KsRancher 28-Sep-21
t-roy 28-Sep-21
bigeasygator 28-Sep-21
WV Mountaineer 28-Sep-21
t-roy 28-Sep-21
sitO 28-Sep-21
Pat Lefemine 28-Sep-21
t-roy 28-Sep-21
Treeline 28-Sep-21
t-roy 28-Sep-21
KsRancher 28-Sep-21
t-roy 28-Sep-21
KsRancher 28-Sep-21
greg simon 29-Sep-21
Rocky D 29-Sep-21
Shiloh 29-Sep-21
drycreek 29-Sep-21
goyt 29-Sep-21
Catscratch 29-Sep-21
maxracx 29-Sep-21
PushCoArcher 29-Sep-21
BigOk 29-Sep-21
wkochevar 29-Sep-21
t-roy 29-Sep-21
lewis 29-Sep-21
KSflatlander 29-Sep-21
JohnMC 29-Sep-21
lewis 29-Sep-21
Will tell 29-Sep-21
12yards 29-Sep-21
Rut Nut 29-Sep-21
TGbow 29-Sep-21
sticksender 29-Sep-21
darralld 29-Sep-21
Habitat 29-Sep-21
TREESTANDWOLF 29-Sep-21
GFL 29-Sep-21
Shuteye 30-Sep-21
t-roy 30-Sep-21
Brotsky 30-Sep-21
GFL 01-Oct-21
GFL 01-Oct-21
From: t-roy
28-Sep-21

t-roy's embedded Photo
One of the no till plots.
t-roy's embedded Photo
One of the no till plots.
t-roy's embedded Photo
One of my conventional plots.
t-roy's embedded Photo
One of my conventional plots.
Just when I thought I’ve dealt with most every food plot related curveball, I got to experience another new twist this year. After getting some much needed rains in August, my brassicas were looking pretty good. Amazing what some rain can do!

From: t-roy
28-Sep-21

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
After working on the road all week, I finally got home and went out to take a look at the plots. This is what I found at one of them…

From: KsRancher
28-Sep-21
Oof. That's rough. I had them get into an 80 of rye 6-7yrs ago. They polished of a 1/3 of the field in a matter of a few days. Like ate down so low it never came back. Had to redrill

From: t-roy
28-Sep-21

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Part of a clover plot.
t-roy's embedded Photo
Part of a clover plot.
This plot wasn’t quite as good as the plot in the top pic, but it was looking pretty good when I left for the week. They destroyed this plot in less than a week!

Army worms are not native to Iowa. Reported infestations of them has been very widespread in Iowa this year. They love alfalfa, clover, certain grasses, and unfortunately, brassicas, amongst other things. Supposedly, the moths were blown in up here from one of the hurricanes this summer, and laid their eggs once here. Fortunately, they cannot survive in cold weather, so we don’t have to deal with them on a yearly basis.

From: bigeasygator
28-Sep-21
Damn, Troy! Need me and Treeman to come run the shove on them??

28-Sep-21
We’re they in the ground long enough to produce bulbs? If so, could you turn them up with a tater disk late season for attractant. I seriously don’t know.

From: t-roy
28-Sep-21

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
I’m hoping to save this clover plot.
t-roy's embedded Photo
I’m hoping to save this clover plot.
I have several different plots, and only have infestations on 2 of them (so far hopefully). They also did extensive damage to our yard. This is the other plot. They completely wiped it out! I planted some winter peas back in here to hopefully have something in it this fall. Sure hope they don’t eat those, too. I sprayed this afternoon, so hopefully they’re dying a slow, painful death, tonight!

From: sitO
28-Sep-21
They attacked my Dad's yard this year too, can do some serious damage quickly. Maybe you could start your own Tequila Company...you know T-royto's?

From: Pat Lefemine
28-Sep-21
The only army General Milley is worthy of commanding

From: t-roy
28-Sep-21
I had a friend that lost his entire brassicas plot 3-4 years ago. I had heard of them, but, until he got wiped out, none of my bowhunting buddies in our area had ever dealt with them before. Do you guys in the south have to contend with them regularly?

From: Treeline
28-Sep-21
Nope, Pat! That army is too damned effective!

From: t-roy
28-Sep-21
KsRancher…my buddy in Oklahoma had them in his irrigated sedan this summer as well, but he caught it quickly and got them sprayed.

BEG…. That’s sounds like a great idea! If nothing else, I’ll get some free fertilizer out of it, if Treeman stays true to form ;-)

WV…..The plants weren’t anywhere near building bulbs yet, and I think even if they had some size on them, I think that if the plant itself was killed by the worms, I’m guessing that those bulbs would probably rot, especially as warm as it still is here. Later in the fall, they would probably be ok. Also, the deer will paw the bulbs up, even in frozen ground.

sitO…..unfortunately, they got into my agave plot, too!

Pat….I thinking I’d rather have the army worms on my place every year, than that traitor!

From: KsRancher
28-Sep-21
In South Central Ks I had to spray my rye probably 75% of the time. But I plant early, around the 1st of September.

From: t-roy
28-Sep-21
Ks…….do they see less of an issue with them if they plant later than what you are planting?

From: KsRancher
28-Sep-21
Yes. The guys that wait till mid Oct don't seem to have any troubles with them. They are horrible this year. There are a few places where they are moving across a county blacktop and the road is a juicy mess for a half mile.

From: greg simon
29-Sep-21
We have problems with army worms almost every year. You have to watch hayfields close and spray them quick to prevent major damage. Fortunately Pounce will make short work of them!!! I’m in central Arkansas.

From: Rocky D
29-Sep-21
T-Roy, that is horrible! I would probably be still going ape sh!t if that would of happened to me!

From: Shiloh
29-Sep-21
We’ve had them way worse than normal this year in MS. Warm wet weather has kept vegetation green and tender so they have been thriving. One positive is that the turkeys will be super healthy!! I am waiting another week before I plant down here. My dad found some in his hay field last week. If you spray with Lambda DO NOT get it on you. Use a closed cab tractor if possible!!

From: drycreek
29-Sep-21
I had them in my yard in the middle of summer. We had some cool rainy days and that seems to bring them on. I just happened to be on the porch with the dogs and saw some crawling in the grass, went to the feed store and got some stuff to spray on them. I haven’t planted anything this year yet because I’m afraid I’ll lose it, they have been that bad. Year before last I had to replant my wheat because they obliterated it.

From: goyt
29-Sep-21
t-roy, so sorry to hear of your challenges. There have been some problems with them in Ohio but not in our immediate area yet. We have been getting a few lows in the 40s. I am not sure how cold it has to get to shut them down.

From: Catscratch
29-Sep-21
I just let them have at it and never sprayed. Was bad this year though. Most of my plots will grow back (cereals, chicory, clovers, etc.) with some rain and cool weather. The worms don't seem to stick around long. Part of nature.

From: maxracx
29-Sep-21
Damn Troy that is awful!!!! All the time and effort that goes into working the land. Very sorry to hear.

From: PushCoArcher
29-Sep-21
They've been terrible in Oklahoma this year. I know of more than one hay meadow destroyed by them this year.

From: BigOk
29-Sep-21
X2 what PushCo stated above. I know of several people who started putting out hay for cattle at the first of September due to the worms destroying grazing pastures.

From: wkochevar
29-Sep-21
So what do the adults look like? do they happen to be a smaller pale yellow butterfly? late summer we were inundated with them and don't recall seeing those numbers before (NE Colorado). Just curious Thx

From: t-roy
29-Sep-21

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo

From: lewis
29-Sep-21
They have been a bear in Tennessee this year they started in my yard but I got them under control pretty quick.They have damaged a lot pasture and some farms are already feeding hay way early for that. I saw a bunch of yards in a resort community close by that were decimated.Lewis

From: KSflatlander
29-Sep-21

KSflatlander's embedded Photo
KSflatlander's embedded Photo

From: JohnMC
29-Sep-21
How do you go from a area with none of these worms to enough to eat a whole plot in a week? Where do the come from so quick in a area that has not had them in the past?

From: lewis
29-Sep-21
The moths lay thousands of eggs and the worms devour the vegetation just above the root and march across the field like an army yep that’s how they got the name.They are not hard to kill and a lot of damage will grow back but it is a big infestation the damage can be permanent.Lewis

From: Will tell
29-Sep-21
They had a picnic on my yard this year. Had them sprayed and it did the trick. If you want to be sure they're army worms mix some Dawn dish soap in a bucket of water. Pour on yard where they've been eating and theyll come out lickedy split.

From: 12yards
29-Sep-21
Holy crap! Iowa grows worms as big as their deer!

From: Rut Nut
29-Sep-21
I thought this was gonna be another political thread when I opened it! ;-)

Sorry to hear this t-roy! Looks like they can do a LOT of damage in a short amount of time! : (

From: TGbow
29-Sep-21
Thats aggravating

From: sticksender
29-Sep-21
Those things are crazy bad. They invaded my daughter's yard in SW Indiana last month, and pretty much destroyed it within a few days. I can confirm that the dish soap thing works to ID them.

From: darralld
29-Sep-21
Man that sucks! I have no plots due to drought. Mid August my clover looked fantastic. Now it's all shriveled up & dead & my turnips never even came up. Field looks like I just planted it. No rain in a month and a half.

From: Habitat
29-Sep-21
Spray food plots with Bifen,works great

29-Sep-21
T-roy, a lot of hard work and gone in an instant with these buggers.

We lost a few as well. It seems you have to constantly monitor for them and the SPRAY!!!!

From: GFL
29-Sep-21
I get them every year on my farm. Sprayer is always loaded down with liquid seven.

They usually don’t get the clover just the wheat and rye grain

From: Shuteye
30-Sep-21
Yep, seven will kill them. BT would probably kill them also and it isn't poison to people.

From: t-roy
30-Sep-21
For you guys that deal with them most every year, are there any early indicators that show you that you have an infestation? I’ve read about windowpaning on grass leaves. I also noticed dozens of Northern Flickers (woodpeckers) feeding in the clover plot below my house. I assumed they were catching grasshoppers, which have been very numerous here this summer, as well. Now, I’m certain that they were feeding on the worms and not grasshoppers.

Damn the evil Republicans for creating global warming and therefore a tremendous increase in the number of hurricanes, thereby creating an easy travel corridor for these destructive monsters!

From: Brotsky
30-Sep-21
When I saw the thread title my first thought was who is "Sh!tting Army Worms"? And how does that happen? Ha! Sorry to hear about the plots t-roy! Hopefully they come back in before the frost. Good moisture and temps right now!

From: GFL
01-Oct-21
It’s normal for the army worms to usually feed most at night. 2 things to look for is there poo and Yellowjacket feed on them.

If you can spray early enough your grains will bounce back fine if you spray.

It doesn’t help me having an 800 acre sod farm close to my farm.

From: GFL
01-Oct-21

GFL's embedded Photo
GFL's embedded Photo
This small field got worms bad and they got most of the wheat seeded in clover. The wheat is coming back fine after I got the field sprayed.

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