Supreme Court
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
Stix 04-Oct-21
HDE 04-Oct-21
wvfarrier 04-Oct-21
[email protected] 04-Oct-21
2Wild Bill 04-Oct-21
JohnMC 04-Oct-21
TGbow 04-Oct-21
deerhunter72 04-Oct-21
Brotsky 04-Oct-21
HDE 04-Oct-21
TGbow 04-Oct-21
Stix 04-Oct-21
BC173 04-Oct-21
BC173 04-Oct-21
spike78 04-Oct-21
JL 04-Oct-21
2Wild Bill 04-Oct-21
TGbow 04-Oct-21
Stix 04-Oct-21
2Wild Bill 05-Oct-21
DanaC 05-Oct-21
2Wild Bill 05-Oct-21
DanaC 05-Oct-21
Stix 05-Oct-21
Stix 05-Oct-21
From: Stix
04-Oct-21
The Supreme Court will hear several hot button issues this term. Praying that they use Godly wisdom to reach decisions using the true guiding principals of our founding fathers.

From: HDE
04-Oct-21
Hope so. If not, what else is there to keep the stupidity at bay? At that point, you can no longer have faith in the system to work the way it should...

From: wvfarrier
04-Oct-21
Make no mistake. If the decisions do not go how the left wants, Xiden will pack that court so tight itll be the end of any moderate decisions

04-Oct-21
Here are a few: The Supreme Court has already agreed to review several important cases in its upcoming term, and it will likely add more soon. Here’s a preview of five of the most important cases the Supreme Court will hear in its 2021-2022 term.

1. Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization

This is the most important abortion case in the last 30 years. Essentially, the Supreme Court will have an opportunity to reconsider—and potentially overrule—its wayward decisions in Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey.

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In 2018, Mississippi enacted the Gestational Age Act, which prohibits abortions after 15 weeks of gestation except in cases of medical emergency or severe fetal abnormality.

>>> Event: Supreme Court Preview of the 2021-2022 Term

The state legislature set forth two findings in the law: 1) 75% of all nations do not permit abortions past 12 weeks’ gestation, and 2) an unborn human’s heart starts beating after five to six weeks’ gestation and by nine weeks all “basic physiological functions are present.”

The legislature also identified several state interests concerning this law. It identified a desire to protect the life of the unborn, the medical profession, and the health of the mother. Most abortions are performed after 15 weeks using the dilation-and-evacuation procedure where the unborn child is crushed and torn apart before pieces of the dead child are removed from the womb.

Not only did Mississippi’s legislature deem that practice “barbaric” and “demeaning to the medical profession,” but they also highlighted the serious medical risks associated with it, such as pelvic infection, blood clots, heavy bleeding, and depression.

The respondent, Jackson Women’s Health Organization, Mississippi’s only abortion clinic, challenged the constitutionality of the prohibition in federal court. The district court invalidated the law, declaring it unconstitutional. Under Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the lower court reasoned, the Supreme Court declared unconstitutional prohibitions of abortions before 24 weeks’ gestation, around the time an unborn human becomes viable.

>>> Preserve the Constitution 2021 Event Series

Thomas Dobbs, Mississippi’s state health officer, appealed the decision to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, which affirmed the district court’s ruling. He then petitioned the Supreme Court, which subsequently granted a review.

It’s hard to overstate the potential impact of this ruling, whether it be a decision upholding the lower courts’ decisions and reaffirming Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which would be a huge blow to the pro-life movement, a moderate ruling that would gradually diminish prior abortion precedents, or a broad decision completely overturning its previous decisions.

2. New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen

This will be the first time in 11 years that the Supreme Court will review a significant Second Amendment case.

New York requires its residents to obtain a license for lawful possession of a firearm, regardless of whether they plan to keep it at home or take it outside. To obtain a license, a licensing officer must determine whether the applicant is of good moral character, lacks a history of crime or mental illness, and that “no good cause exists for the denial of the license.”

Applicants must also have “proper cause” to lawfully conceal carry a handgun—openly carrying a handgun is entirely banned. New York law leaves “proper cause” undefined, but courts have clarified that this standard means one must “demonstrate a special need for self-protection distinguishable from that of the general community or of persons engaged in the same profession.”

Merely having the “generalized desire” to conceal carry, according to the courts, “does not constitute ‘proper cause.’”

Petitioners Robert Nash and Brendan Koch were denied a license to carry a handgun in public despite including in their applications their desire for self-defense and that they have extensive safety training. The licensing officers determined they had failed to show proper cause because they did not demonstrate “a special need for self-defense that distinguished [themselves] from the general public.”

Petitioners filed suit challenging this standard, arguing that it violated the Second Amendment. The district court and the 2nd Circuit, however, found their challenges foreclosed because of an earlier decision by the 2nd Circuit, Kachalsky v. County of Westchester, which held that restrictions like these are constitutional.

According to the 2nd Circuit in that case, the Supreme Court’s decisions in Heller and McDonald clarified that the right to bear arms “are at their zenith within the home,” but that governments have more leeway to regulate firearm possession outside of the home so that New York’s “proper cause” standard was constitutional.

The issue before the Supreme Court is whether New York violated petitioners’ Second Amendment rights when denying their applications for conceal-carry permits for self-defense.

3. Carson v. Makin

The Carson and Nelson families are challenging Maine’s prohibition of applying state funds from the state’s tuition assistance program towards secondary schools that, in addition to teaching academic subjects, provide religious instruction.

Petitioners argue this law prevents their families from using the funds towards the schools they consider to be best for their children and, more importantly, that it violates their Constitutional rights under the free exercise, establishment, and equal protection clauses.

Petitioners filed suit and lost in both federal district court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit. Although the Supreme Court ruled in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, that states cannot exclude families or schools from participating in a student-aid program solely because of a school’s religious status, the lower courts relied on a distinction between use-based versus status-based restrictions.

The lower courts reasoned that the Supreme Court’s decision in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue prevented states from excluding schools from government programs on the basis of the school’s religious status, but it did not address whether states could prohibit how the funds were being used—for religious education.

In other words, so long as the school is only nominally religious, it cannot be excluded, but if it promotes religion, a state can exclude it from receiving funds on that basis.

The issue before the Supreme Court is whether a state violates the First or 14th Amendments by prohibiting students from choosing to use student-aid funds towards schools that provide religious instruction.

4. CVS Pharmacy Inc. v. Doe

This case raises the issue of whether policies that disparately impact disabled groups violate the anti-discrimination provisions of the Rehabilitation Act and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

The respondents, using “John Doe” aliases, are enrollees of employee-sponsored health care who are afflicted with HIV. The petitioners, all wholly owned subsidiaries of CVS Health Corporation, provide the John Does with their medication.

The respondents sued CVS after the latter implemented a new medication policy that required all specialty medicines—medicines that typically treat chronic conditions and are usually more expensive—to be mailed if the respondents wish to purchase it at their in-network price. If the respondents or any other enrollee chooses to purchase specialty medications in-person at a pharmacy, they will be charged a higher rate.

The respondents argue this delivery mandate prevents them from receiving assistance from pharmacy benefit managers who can provide them with consultations about their medications, hinders pharmacists from tracking potentially life-threatening drug interactions, and exposes them to potential risks like shipping errors, theft, and breaches to their medical privacy.

The respondents allege this change denies them meaningful access to medical care, which would be a violation of the Rehabilitation Act and the Affordable Care Act.

The outcome of this case will clarify whether, and if so the extent to which, facially neutral policies can be deemed discriminatory if they disparately impact a distinct group.

5. United States v. Zubaydah

This case involves the state-secrets privilege, which was established by Supreme Court precedent in United States v. Reynolds. In United States v. Reynolds, the Supreme Court held that courts must exclude privileged evidence if it threatens national security interests.

Abu Zubaydah is a former associate of Osama bin Laden who was detained in Pakistan by the CIA for being an enemy combatant and put in a detention facility in Poland. During his time there, the CIA used enhanced interrogation techniques on Zubaydah.

Poland launched a criminal investigation into the CIA’s operations there, and Zubaydah asked a U.S. federal district court to order the U.S. government to provide Poland with information pertaining to his detention. The district court was initially willing to grant discovery for these materials until the U.S. government blocked it, citing the state secrets privilege established in the United States v. Reynolds.

On appeal, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit reversed and remanded the decision, arguing that the lower court could allow limited discovery because some of the materials would not threaten national security interests.

The issue before the Supreme Court is whether the 9th Circuit erred in its assessment of these materials concerning their potential to harm national security.

Of course, these are only a few of the cases the Supreme Court will consider this term. It will also consider important death penalty cases—including one involving the Boston Marathon Bomber and another involving an inmate’s access to a spiritual advisor during the execution process, as well as a host of other important cases.

T

From: 2Wild Bill
04-Oct-21
Paul,

Thank you for the great thumbnail sketches of the cases.

In all the cases as mentioned, the decision standard is not the Constitution, but the "Courtstitution", and therein has been the problem with the Supreme Court since 1803. At that time Justice John Marshall assumed the power to define the law, rather than follow the law. In effect, second guessing the actions of Congress and subjecting them to the will of the Court. Thomas Jefferson had a problem with what was done at that time, but was unable to get Congress to follow suit. He did have a foreign issue with the Tripoli pirates which took considerable attention away from domestic affairs. It wasn't till 1832 that John Marshall paid for his arrogance and President Andrew Jackson thumbed his nose at the Court decision. Sadly this was the decision by Georgia to relocate native American tribes from their homelands. America lost some moral footing in society during that time, sadly.

From: JohnMC
04-Oct-21
It is ironic that a never Trumper that started this threaded is now praying that the Supreme Court hopes to save the country from leftist policies.

From: TGbow
04-Oct-21
Around the time of the end of WW1, the progressive movement was born. One of the main goals was ro get the courts to stop referring to the constituion and refer to past cases. Eventually you end up where we are today...they make decisions based on their own bias. Also, dont count on a Republican president to appoint conservative judges....whetever conservative means today, some of our worse judges were appointed by Republicans. The so called moderates are the ones that usually tilt the scales. Biden, if he has the opportunity will certainly appoint a radical leftist. Its sad but both parties are not dependable as far as constitutionality is concerned

From: deerhunter72
04-Oct-21
Paul, thanks for that information. We all need to be praying for the SCOTUS.

From: Brotsky
04-Oct-21
I will pray that the court follows the outline of the Constitution of the United States and not a left OR right leaning political ideology. I'll now return to the community forum with its smattering of bowhunting topics.

From: HDE
04-Oct-21
The problem with most attorneys and courts is they cite case law and that's all they do. Makes me wonder their ability to even make a valid argument when presenting a case.

The Constitution is not a difficult document to understand. The greed and narcissism of attorneys (aka courts, politicians, and bureaucrats) misconstrue it to mean what they want it to mean. When you challenge it, they monolog about their legal experience and education. Whatever...

From: TGbow
04-Oct-21
Spot on HDE

From: Stix
04-Oct-21
I am not a 'Never trumper', whatever that is.

I voted for Trump the first time, but not the second. The reasoning: Trump called in my old army unit (5-19th SFG) to assist with the quelling of violent activity at Whitehouse, which is a noble cause. What was unconstitutional was he ordered them to launch an offensive against US citizens solely to clear a path to have a photo op in front of a church with a bible in hand. As Americans, we should all be outraged with that action. I voted libertarian the last election.

From: BC173
04-Oct-21
HDE x2

From: BC173
04-Oct-21
Justice Antonin Scalia’s statement regarding the Constitution is profound and yet, very simple.

“ The Constitution means exactly what is says; and does not mean what it doesn’t say.”

From: spike78
04-Oct-21
The problem is these judges go on their feelings and beliefs and NOT the way the law reads. Nowhere in the 2A does it say “in your home”.

From: JL
04-Oct-21

JL's Link
Stix.....what was your source that Prez Trump ordered the military to launch an offensive against the violent protesters to clear a path? I could not find any source that said he indeed did order the military to get control over the rioters.....who by the way burned down that church. It was discussed, but appears it never happened.

"....On June 1, invocation of the Insurrection Act to deploy active-duty military forces was discussed in an Oval Office meeting and favored by Vice President Mike Pence but opposed by Attorney General Bill Barr, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley, and Defense Secretary Mark Esper.[8][37] A senior Pentagon official recalled that Trump said, "We need to get control of the streets. We need 10,000 troops up here [in Washington]. I want it right now."[38] Barr stated that the Act was a "break-the-glass-in-case-of-emergency" option and "really not necessary in this situation". Rather, local law enforcement and the National Guard could be used to make a show of force and dominate the streets.[39] The same day, White House aides drafted a proclamation to invoke the act.[37] The Insurrection Act was last invoked in 1992 at California's request in response to the Rodney King riots. It has also been used during the Civil rights movement to enforce school integration and desegregation.[40]....

.....A number of law enforcement agencies were involved, including the U.S. Park Police (USPP), U.S. Secret Service, Metropolitan Police Department (MPD), D.C. National Guard, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Arlington County Police Department, U.S. Marshals, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF).[5][104][105] National Guard members were present but did not participate in clearing protesters.[106][107]....."

From: 2Wild Bill
04-Oct-21
TGbow, "Around the time of the end of WW1, the progressive movement was born. "

That's about twenty years too late, Teddy Roosevelt was the first progressive President.

The practice of case law vs Constitution was an issue in the Dred Scott decision 1857, pre-Civil War.

From: TGbow
04-Oct-21
Bill, you are correct..Teddy n Woodrow Wilson were the daddys of the progressive movement. I think 1913 was when the Federal Income Tax and the Federal Reserve came about..there bouts.

JFK desired to abolish the Federal Reserve..wish he had

From: Stix
04-Oct-21
Commanders of the unit to which I still confer with. The actual statement is they were ordered to secure a path to the church for the President to have a press announcement. He may have not actually ordered it, but was involved in a unconstitutional action, using US troops against US civilians for an activity not related to national security.

From: 2Wild Bill
05-Oct-21
Stix, "unconstitutional action,"

And which of the eight Articles or twenty-seven amendments was there a violation of?

From: DanaC
05-Oct-21
Depending on exactly which troop were used it *may have* been a violation of the posse comitatus act.

(Whether the District of Columbia National Guard is exempted is a matter of current debate.)

From: 2Wild Bill
05-Oct-21
And how does that differ from Congress using Federal troops to cordon off the Capitol Building?

From: DanaC
05-Oct-21
As I said, only certain troop are covered under posse comitatus law. Details matter... not sure laws were violated either way, BUT, Congress *must* meet and vote on election, Trump's church visit was *optional*.

Anyway, we're pretty far astray from the OP.

From: Stix
05-Oct-21
Agreed Dana, we did stray from my original prayer request that our judicial branch be blessed with Godly wisdom.

From: Stix
05-Oct-21
Agreed Dana, we did stray from my original prayer request that our judicial branch be blessed with Godly wisdom.

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