Packing "just in case" prescriptions ??
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
SteveB 19-Oct-21
Grey Ghost 19-Oct-21
Shug 19-Oct-21
molsonarcher 19-Oct-21
Scoot 19-Oct-21
WV Mountaineer 19-Oct-21
Grey Ghost 19-Oct-21
bluedog 19-Oct-21
WapitiBob 19-Oct-21
Shug 19-Oct-21
Brotsky 19-Oct-21
ben h 19-Oct-21
Habitat 19-Oct-21
IdyllwildArcher 19-Oct-21
Shuteye 19-Oct-21
Shug 19-Oct-21
Rut Nut 19-Oct-21
Yasla 19-Oct-21
midwest 19-Oct-21
Shug 19-Oct-21
Grey Ghost 19-Oct-21
drycreek 19-Oct-21
Jaquomo 19-Oct-21
kscowboy 19-Oct-21
goelk 19-Oct-21
Al Dente Laptop 19-Oct-21
WV Mountaineer 19-Oct-21
Kevin Dill 19-Oct-21
JL 19-Oct-21
petedrummond 19-Oct-21
Corax_latrans 19-Oct-21
Thornton 19-Oct-21
greenmountain 20-Oct-21
SteveB 20-Oct-21
Bake 20-Oct-21
txhunter58 20-Oct-21
cnelk 20-Oct-21
IdyllwildArcher 20-Oct-21
JL 20-Oct-21
midwest 20-Oct-21
cnelk 20-Oct-21
JL 20-Oct-21
Candor 21-Oct-21
Thornton 22-Oct-21
DanaC 22-Oct-21
WV Mountaineer 22-Oct-21
DanaC 22-Oct-21
WV Mountaineer 22-Oct-21
DanaC 22-Oct-21
cnelk 22-Oct-21
WV Mountaineer 22-Oct-21
Bake 22-Oct-21
From: SteveB
19-Oct-21
Shug's mule deer thread caused me to recall a trip deep into East Africa bush where carrying a broad spectrum antibiotic (CIPRO) likely saved my life after a diverticulitis attack. I have always done so for 30+ years. In fact, I now consider it mandatory equipment! I also carry prescription pain killers and various other drugs in the event something should happen rather than ruin a trip or worse. I recall an article a few years ago where two guys in remote Alaska had to flag a plane to get help as a hunter was dying from a blocked urinary tract from a kidney stone. Anyone else do the same or have an interesting story?

From: Grey Ghost
19-Oct-21
I have a good friend who is a fishing guide in Florida. He suffered a serious heart attack while on the water a few years ago, with no known pre-existing warning signs. As luck would have it, his client had a heart condition, and was carrying nitroglycerin pills. They likely saved my friend's life.

Matt

From: Shug
19-Oct-21
Same here Steve… I always bring an anti biotic script…(levofloxacin) except that time… I forgot it.

I need to be very careful too… years ago after a normal middle age male camera test I ended up with an E. coli blood infection. I spent 11 days in the hospital fighting the infection..

For that reason I “ always” bring antibiotics

From: molsonarcher
19-Oct-21
I travel with my kidney stone meds and some script painkillers. Knock on wood never needed them, and hope i never do, but i cant handle a kidney stone without them.

From: Scoot
19-Oct-21
How do you guys get the antibiotic? Do you just explain the deal to your GP and he/she is willing to write a "just in case" prescription?

I carry Aleve, Benadryl, and four more significant pain killers (what I hope would be enough to get someone/me off the mountain or through until help arrived. I'd happily carry an antibiotic, if I thought I could get one.

19-Oct-21
Prescription pain pills have never made sense to me. The handful of times I’ve taken them, prescribed of course, the affects weren’t in line with surviving. Instead, just being high out of my head. That offers me nothing in a life and death situation. If you are different then sobeit. But, pains never killed anyone. However incapacitated thoughts without a clear head has. YMMV.

From: Grey Ghost
19-Oct-21
Scoot,

I got a gum infection right before a scheduled trip a few years ago. My dentist wrote me a prescription for antibiotics, and added 2 additional "just in case" bottles to the prescription. I still have those extra bottles, and carry them on every trip.

That reminds me, does anyone know if antibiotics have a shelf life?

Matt

From: bluedog
19-Oct-21
Been told from trusted source that antibiotics and pain prescriptions both will only lose 10 or 15% strength in 10 years if kept out of direct sun light. They remain safe to use.

From: WapitiBob
19-Oct-21
Benadryl, Methocarbamol, hydrocodone, and oxycodone is in my pack on every hunt.

From: Shug
19-Oct-21
Scoot … since my urologist is the one that almost killed me he’s happy to scrip me the meds… Just in case..

From: Brotsky
19-Oct-21
I always have Benadryl, Ibuprofen, and oxycodone in my first aid kit. I'm not sure I could get the scrip for an antibiotic nor would I know if I needed to take it in most cases. The pain meds are only in case of a disaster, I.E. broken leg or ankle or other serious injury where I may need to bear a great deal of pain in order to make it to safety. Carrying an inReach device now eliminates some of those possibilities but still good insurance IMO.

From: ben h
19-Oct-21
One time in the Wind Rivers, I had a tendon issue and had to "drop the bomb" to get out. We always have a few pain killers for that purpose. I think that was 2005 and I hate those things. It's not a bad idea to include some Prednisone (steroids), in your "just in case kit". Even with a sprain ankle they'll make you feel a lot better without the narcotic effect; which is also why Dr's are reluctant to prescribe them because you can do a lot, when you shouldn't, but what the hell are you supposed to do 5 miles from your truck, and 100 to the nearest treatment facility?

From: Habitat
19-Oct-21
There should be a pain killer out there that doesn't cause you to seem crazy.We carry all the regular tylenol,aleve,benedryl etc and a tourniquet,ace bandage,needle and thread.

19-Oct-21
Depending on the hunt, I generally have varying supplies that would rival a 3rd world pharmacy/ER. Unfortunately, on the hunts you'd really need the stuff, it's too heavy.

From: Shuteye
19-Oct-21
I had a logger working in my woods when a bunch of bees stung him. He ran to his truck and got a bottle of pills. He took two and said they saved his life. He was allergic to bee stings and always carried those pills. My cousin was also allergic to stings and carried a hypodermic needle with something in it. He got stung and and injected himself right through his blue jeans.

From: Shug
19-Oct-21
For all you guys carrying oxy’s If you decide you don’t need them pm me for my address..

From: Rut Nut
19-Oct-21
I don't know how people can take Opioids for any extended period of time! I was on Oxycodone and Dilaudid for a couple weeks when I was in the hospital for a snakebite. Couldn't move my bowels for over a week! It was bad..........................................I got off them ASAP once they discharged me!

I don;t take any prescription meds on any of my backcountry adventures..................................just a standard (small) first aid kit with clotting gauze and tylenol/benadryl

From: Yasla
19-Oct-21
i always have some muscle relaxers with me- have a bad back and get into muscle spasms fairly often. Being able to take anything to sleep at night mostly is super helpful

From: midwest
19-Oct-21
Dang Shug beat me to it. Oxy sure does enhance my beer drinking.

From: Shug
19-Oct-21

Shug's embedded Photo
Lower back.. Plzz don’t turn
Shug's embedded Photo
Lower back.. Plzz don’t turn
Why do I carry muscle relaxers and mild pain pills?

From: Grey Ghost
19-Oct-21
I generally agree with others who don't care for prescription pain killers. I've been scripted them for a variety of sports-related injuries and surgeries. The "take as needed" instructions on the bottle was always my excuse to not use them. I've seen how destructively addictive they can be to some people.

That said, when I broke 5 ribs and punctured a lung in a skiing accident, they had to insert a tube into my chest cavity to drain the blood and fluids that were building up. They gave me Ketamine for that procedure. I think I'd rather die than ever have that crap put in my body again. 4 days later, when I was still in a lot of pain but resisting to take pain killers, it was time to pull the tube out. They gave me Fentanyl for that procedure. When that stuff kicked in, I felt like I could run a marathon. I had zero pain and felt a euphoria for about 6 hours that I've never experienced before. So, I certainly understand how people can get addicted to opioids.

Matt

From: drycreek
19-Oct-21
I take so damn many pills every day that I’d have to have a “pill bearer” as well as a guide if I went on some of the hunts you guys go on. :-)

From: Jaquomo
19-Oct-21
Diverticulitis meds everywhere for me. Plus an asthma rescue inhaler. I only get a diverticulitis attack about once every three years, but it can kill you if not treated promptly. Wrecked a hunt for me the first time, and I'm probably lucky to be alive.

My hunting partner never knew he had diverticula until he ended up in the hospital. Same with mother in law, who nearly died and spent three weeks in the hospital, lost a chunk of her colon. Another good friend has had 8 surgeries after an attack when he never knew he had it, now wears a bag for the rest of his life.

If you are over 50 and have never had a colonoscopy to see if you have diverticula, and you don't always get plenty of fiber on hunts, I highly recommend it. Could save your life, or at the very least save an expensive remote hunt.

From: kscowboy
19-Oct-21
I got dysentery in Western Tanzania and luckily they had antibiotics in camp. I spent the remainder of the trip peeing out my rear end but still got to hunt. I lost 14 lbs and the good news is that I have kept the weight off since (back in 2015).

I did get a recommendation on my sheep hunt to have prescription pain pills just in case you really hurt yourself and couldn't get a plane out for a couple of days. I am not a pill guy at all and they all made the trip back home and into the medicine cabinet for a future hunt.

From: goelk
19-Oct-21
I'm with Molonarcher always carry meds for Kidney Stones . Had a couple and it's no fun. Lucky i was able to pass them.

19-Oct-21
No matter where I travel, either hunting, weekend getaway with the family, or a full blown vacation, I always carry meds, ointments, wraps, tapes, dressings, suture kit, etc... And I always include tampons, they absorb a lot of blood and can literally be a life saver.

19-Oct-21
If you can operate to get out under prescription pain meds, then you are a better man then I. Or, you wasn’t hurt that bad to begin with. I’ve taken five tractor trailer loads of them prescribed for six surgeries. They don’t knock pain like that for me. Just blows me outta my mind.

Of course, everyone is different. And, some have scars others can’t relate to because it’s something we’ve never experienced.

From: Kevin Dill
19-Oct-21
I always have: Prednisone Dose Pack, Azithromycin Dose Pack, a few Vicodin, Immodium or Lomotil, Keflex and some otc stuff.

In 2009 I was in Alaska and became extremely sick the day we flew into camp. I had no clue what was wrong, but my symptoms were consistent with some type of infection. I had nothing to lose by taking the Z-Pack. 48 hours later I was able to eat and navigate around camp. The Z-Pack did the job and I recovered completely.

From: JL
19-Oct-21
I know everyone can have different aliments.....I guess that is normal ops. I take antibiotics, my normal daily supplements and two types of pills should a bout of gout spring up. Had a touch coming on last week in Broadus and took two days worth of pills and it went away. So....for you folks who have dealt with gout....it sucks when it is full on.

From: petedrummond
19-Oct-21

petedrummond's embedded Photo
petedrummond's embedded Photo
You can buy “fish antibiotics” without a scrip and cheaper too. Been buying them for over 30 years. When i go hunting or fishing whether at home Europe Canada or Africa I keep a supply of amoxicillin, keflex, erythromycin and a couple of others. Docs and hospitals can be real hard to come by sometime.

19-Oct-21
I don’t go anywhere without Amoxy; diverticulitis, like some others here.

Usually when I get a script for heavy-duty pain meds, I don’t take them…. but I will occasionally (very rarely) take one if I’m in too much pain to sleep. I have some chronic things that sometimes don’t feel too good. A 1-week supply usually lasts me a couple years.

Those go on big trips.

But you do need to know to not take Motrin with any kind of head trauma. Avoid blood thinners when bleeding is a problem/concern. Tylenol is a better bet for that.

But DO NOT take my word for it. My Sis is an MD; I’m not.

Prescription drugs are a tremendous blessing, but there’s a reason they’re by script only. They’ll kill you if you use them incorrectly.

From: Thornton
19-Oct-21
I carry a military issue battle trauma bag, IV kit with benadryl for anaphylaxis, IV nausea meds, IV fluids, and tylenol for pain and fever. Nearly died from probable viral meningitis in my last Canada trip and when I went septic, alI I had was overpriced, 10 tylenol from the gas station. It won't happen again.

20-Oct-21
I took a supply of prescription mads when I was working in Indonesia. My doctor explained the conditions when I should take each. After my trip I informed him I didn't have to open any. He instructed me to dispose of them and call him If I needed to go back.

From: SteveB
20-Oct-21
Glad to hear Im not alone in being proactive in bring meds along. For you guys that only take pain meds....please ask your GP for a small scrip of Broad Spectrum antibiotic like CIPRO or KEFLEX which could save your life, if not at least make your hunt doable at bare minimum. Besides Tylenol and Antihistamines, I take along a few Vicodin, Prednisone, CIPRO, and a Z-Pak. My GP understands my needs and has no issue doing so because he knows I won't abuse it.

From: Bake
20-Oct-21
I have a very understanding doctor. Whenever I get a new doctor, I explain to him my situation (and I have old X-rays and scans on file), and backcountry hunting, and I've never had an issue.

I have recurring back problems, and sometimes it takes only a twist and I'm down hard. So I always have painkillers around. I used to have a muscle relaxer and a separate sleeping/anxiety pill (travel sometimes makes me anxious or gets me worked up), but my current doctor combined the two, and now I have Valium for use as a muscle relaxer and sleep/anxiety aid. He'll give me pain pills all day long, but won't ever give me too much Valium. Which is a shame, because that stuff is amazing :)

He'll give me CIPRO, Bentyl, a nausea pill too for when I travel overseas.

I feel like I'm traveling with a pharmacy, but it's nice to have some access to stuff in case of an infected tooth, or something that's not a big deal, which could cause a lot of pain and ruin a hunt.

From: txhunter58
20-Oct-21
I always take some antibiotics (general ones plus Meteonidazole). The metro is for Giardia diarrhea. I take a pump filter but want some just in case because Giardia can ruin a hunt.

The only exception to the “antibiotics last 10 years” would be the tetracycline class antibiotic (tetracycline/ doxycycline/ minocycline). They can actually cause harm to you if they are too old. I always figure you are good for at least a year beyond the printed expiration date even for those.

From: cnelk
20-Oct-21
I never leave home without Viagra… because you just never know…. just in case…

20-Oct-21
Brad, just take one twice a day and then you won't have to ever worry about it.

Another thing I bring that really helps when you're sleeping on the ground, is Melatonin. Take it when you get back to camp and then prepare dinner and you're ready to crash out when you get in the sleeping bag and it helps you fall asleep faster and get better sleep.

And for the Melatonin nay-sayers: You just didn't take enough. It has no toxic level. If it's not working for you, keep trying a higher dose until it does.

From: JL
20-Oct-21
"I never leave home without Viagra… because you just never know…. just in case…"

You been putting in for those California tags a little too much.....;-)

From: midwest
20-Oct-21
I take Viagra every night. It keeps me from rolling off the mountain. :-/

From: cnelk
20-Oct-21
^^^ That’s the same reason I do!!

From: JL
20-Oct-21
Ha!! You guys must have to special order your camo....

From: Candor
21-Oct-21
Yall with cipro (and other fluoroquinolones) be mindful of how it can cause tendon ruptures. I know two folks who ruptured their achilles when taking it. I believe it has been black boxed for it.

From: Thornton
22-Oct-21
Go with something else than Cipro. I know it works for flare up on chronic bowel disorders, but it has several major side effects common with repeated use. It reorganizes the mitochondrial DNA and can cause patellar tendon rupture and irreversible chronic pain with joints. Also, I've seen it cause hallucinations in older people. Maybe Bactrim would be better for emergency broad spectrum if you're not allergic to sulfa.

From: DanaC
22-Oct-21
Someone mentioned opioids and constipation. A bottle of 'stool softener' is cheap otc. We mostly think of 'gastric upset' as sh* blowing out of us but getting the plumbing 'backed up' is just as bad a problem. Especially if dehydration is a possibility.

22-Oct-21
This comment is for folks that don’t have a fused spine. So, apply accordingly.

If you are taking enough opioids in a survival situation in the wild to cause constipation issues, then you are going to die. It’s just that simple. Theory and reality are far apart sometimes. Just sayin’.

Im not being combative at all. But, this is a topic I find fascinating. I can’t relate to any reasoning I’ve heard for their presence in a back country first aid kit. Not because I think it’s stupid. Just because I don’t have the perspective to see the benefit. And, my reasoning is I’d like to learn something if I’m missing something.

I certainly don’t feel as I’m entitled to justification. Just trying to understand what I’m missing. How in the world is pain pills going to save your life? That’s what a first aid kit is for. Saving your life. Not duplicating a hospital setting.

From: DanaC
22-Oct-21
WV, it isn't just opiods that can cause constipation. Some years ago I was prescribed heavy-dose ibuprofen for a knee problem, and that was a side effect for me. (Got switched to naproxen, problem solved.) Different people react to different meds differently.

Pain pills may not 'save your life' but the ability to think clearly, without being in agony, just might.

22-Oct-21
That’s my point Dana. We’ve went from pain as an inhibitor to constipation. It’s survival and trauma care in a little bitty container called a first aid kit. Not inpatient care in a hospital.

That’s my lack of understanding and fascination with carrying opioids in a first aid kit for hunting. And, thinking clearly on pain pills is an oxy moron. Their sole purpose is to dull the senses. They don’t in anyway increase a clear thought process.

I understand traveling. I understand the antibiotics. That’s smart. I understand I’ve morphed this into a wilderness hunt scenario. But, I’ve watched and heard countless guys talk of doing this for hunting out of their packs for multiple days. That’s my confusion.

From: DanaC
22-Oct-21
" They don’t in anyway increase a clear thought process. "

True, but being in pain can DEcrease one's ability to think clearly. What's worse? Pain and panic, or numbness? And that will depend on the individual's ability to tolerate pain. No simple answers, because individual ability to tolerate drugs likewise varies.

From: cnelk
22-Oct-21
BIG difference between 1st Aid and 2nd Aid. Know the difference

22-Oct-21
Brad for the win.

From: Bake
22-Oct-21
I don't carry pain pills for a survival situation. I carry them for comfort in case my back goes out. Or comfort in case I get an infected tooth or something like that.

Also, pain pills and muscle relaxers may give me enough dull to be able to get out if necessary. I once twisted wrong on a turkey hunt at home and every muscle in my lower back said "*(& YOU!!". It took me over an hour to hobble 3/4 mile to the truck. It got steadily worse the longer I hobbled. Once I got to the truck I had to open and shut two gates to get off the property. I was almost screaming in pain.

Got home, called in to work. Laid in bed and took some pain pills and muscle relaxers. The next day I was still stove up, but able to ambulate.

That's why I keep them on me while hunting.

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