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37-40% Protein cattle range blocks f/WT?
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
dustyvarmint 14-Apr-08
Plowjockey 14-Apr-08
guidermd 14-Apr-08
blackwolf 14-Apr-08
Dude 14-Apr-08
pirogue 15-Apr-08
dustyvarmint 15-Apr-08
meathntr_trphywife 15-Apr-08
blackwolf 15-Apr-08
Thumper 15-Apr-08
B4LITE 16-Apr-08
B4LITE 18-Apr-08
Bowman 18-Apr-08
Bowman 18-Apr-08
meathntr_trphywife 20-Apr-08
dustyvarmint 21-Apr-08
meathntr_trphywife 21-Apr-08
fuzzy 23-Nov-22
wytex 23-Nov-22
Swampbuck 23-Nov-22
Whackmaster 24-Nov-22
From: dustyvarmint
14-Apr-08
Wondering if 37-40% protein cattle range blocks would be ok for WT?

They're typically cheaper at farm supply stores than the items targeted at wildlife. I'd think the protein would be good for the does and off spring production and antler growth and health for the bucks?

There were some cautions on the label including "For ruminants only" and "Not for sheep with copper sensitivities."

Thoughts?

Thanks, dv

From: Plowjockey
14-Apr-08
Compare tags head to head... Deer are ruminants and if I remember it had copper in it. I compared and some of the levels were a little higher in one and some were lower.. I put them out cause we had old ones here at work (cattle protien blocks) and the deer used them. But not to any degree so I have not put anything out since... Just my view on it. Good quality forage is what they seem to like. Of course I am in corn, bean and alfalfa country..

From: guidermd
14-Apr-08
it all depends. deer that have the minerals they need supplied to them naturally won't have much interest in the blocks. if the natural environment does not give the deer the minerals they need, then they will crave the blocks. different areas will give different results.

From: blackwolf
14-Apr-08
Have used those in northern Wis before it became illegal due to cwd concerns. The deer craved them April, May and June. JIm

From: Dude
14-Apr-08
I am not a nutritionist, but cattle are large ruminants. If you could find those designed for small ruminants (sheeps and goats) they would likely fill their needs more.

I think I would look more into mineral mixes in the spring then for protein. Most area with young green plants should fill the need for protein level, but are generally lacking in minerals.

From: pirogue
15-Apr-08
Purina makes different blocks and pellets especially prepared for deer with their requirements and seasonal needs in mind, whether it be for antler growth or help with lactation. Most feed stores will order it for you if they don't stock. Why put out something made for cattle if you have WT in mind?

From: dustyvarmint
15-Apr-08
Thanks for everyone's help, Jerry

15-Apr-08
Look on the tag. Right after crude protein is should state the crude protein from NPN. If very much of the protein is from NPN I would avoid it. If the protein is from cottonseed or soybean meal you should be OK. Very much urea could be at the very least, unpalatable

From: blackwolf
15-Apr-08
Correction, I used high mineral range blocks, not protein blocks. Jim

From: Thumper
15-Apr-08
Bush-hog the natural foliage and then fertilize.

From: B4LITE
16-Apr-08

B4LITE's embedded Photo
B4LITE's embedded Photo
I use salt in Feb-May so it's gone by deer season and it seems to work. Took this one in area I had put some small salt blocks in last spring but, we have good browes most of the year. He is almost perfect with 1.3" in deductions. 150 4/8 net

17-Apr-08
Just remember that mineral blocks are considered bait and baiting regulations apply.

From: B4LITE
18-Apr-08
In Georgia you can put feed out but must not have any out 10 days prior or must be over 200 yards away. I only use salt to help them recover during the spring and oly put 2 lbs blocks so tey are gone way before the season.

From: Bowman
18-Apr-08
Maybe a protein mix with a mineral lick. I have seen recommendations to put out several mineral sites and then maintain the ones that get used. One or two sites per fifty acres. Although, I think the protein needed is like 10-12% < not sure? But, deer are classified as a ruminant animal because they have a four chambered stomach. And besides copper is yummy!!

From: Bowman
18-Apr-08
Here is a DIY mineral lick I got out of a magazine. Dig a 3 ft.x 3 ft. hole about 1 ft. deep. Mix sodium chloride (salt) and dicalcium phosphate (calcium) at a 1 to 1 ratio. Then fill hole with mixture and soil.

20-Apr-08
About the copper, sheep are highly sensitive to copper. Minerals formulated for cattle or sheep can be toxic to sheep unless molydenum is added to tie it up. Copper sensitivity hasn't been tested in deer, but it is doubtful that it would be a problem.

From: dustyvarmint
21-Apr-08
Great info & discussion. Thanks and keep 'em coming.

dv

21-Apr-08
I meant to say minerals formulated for cattle and goats have higher copper. The copper requirement for cattle and goats is about 8 ppm. For sheep it is 4 ppm. The maximum tolerable level for sheep is around 10. These are levels for the total dry matter consumption not just the mineral.

From: fuzzy
23-Nov-22
Bringing this one back up b/c it's been awhile. Lots of food plot discussions on here.

From: wytex
23-Nov-22
We use all stock blocks and have big horn sheep on the ranch. Studies have shown the sheep in our area have copper deficiency so that is no concern. Have had no ill affects of all stock blocks and use some WT Inst. 30-06 also.

From: Swampbuck
23-Nov-22
Been using FRM ( Flint River Mills) deer mineral for years now. It’s not a block, it’s in a granular form. I dig up a 2’x4’ spot in the food plots pour it down and mix it up with the diggings. I start in March-July. Seems to really help out antler growth and nursing does

24-Nov-22
I got this recipe off this site and have been using it for years. Deer hit it hard and it’s pretty In expense for 200 lbs. 100 lbs of beef mineral high in calcium and phosphorus. 50 pounds of Di-cal and 50 lbs of salt. Mix 2 parts mineral, 1 part dical, 1 part salt in a five gallon bucket and mix in soil. Use same mineral sites every year

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