Summit Treestands
Advanced Post Season Scouting - Discuss
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
guidermd 21-Dec-11
Mad Trapper 21-Dec-11
Shiras 21-Dec-11
Brotsky 21-Dec-11
Coccon Man 21-Dec-11
pogo 21-Dec-11
Brotsky 21-Dec-11
Bowfreak 21-Dec-11
Matt Palmquist 21-Dec-11
Medicinemann 21-Dec-11
Bowfreak 21-Dec-11
Matt Palmquist 21-Dec-11
Elkhunter - Home 21-Dec-11
Mad Trapper 21-Dec-11
GAFFER1 21-Dec-11
DonSchultz 23-Dec-11
Genesis 25-Dec-11
crankn101 25-Dec-11
Catskiller 25-Dec-11
From: guidermd
21-Dec-11
can't start the post season scouting until the season is finished, still got about 50 days to go

From: Mad Trapper
21-Dec-11
Good article. As you continue to develop the property, your chainsaw is going to be your best friend. Our season late archery season starts after Christmas and goes through the middle of January. Then the chainsaw period begins! You will find that strategic use of the chainsaw will allow you to get deer to bed and travel where you want them to. Too bad you cannot use bait stations to take a herd inventory. It is a very effective way to see what deer made it through hunting season. Trapping/predator control is also an important activity. I wish we could trap black bears in PA!

From: Shiras
21-Dec-11

Shiras's Link
How about some thermal imaging?

From: Brotsky
21-Dec-11
Pat, it'll be interesting to see how your turnips do come late January and into February and March. In our neck of the woods they don't really hit the turnips until late in the winter and they fill an important gap until spring forage becomes available.

From: Coccon Man
21-Dec-11
I had two acres of purple top turnips planted this year and the plots looked like I had run a disc over them by mid NOV.

From: pogo
21-Dec-11
@Pat... I enjoyed reading it and I have to admit, even an old timer like myself can still learn a thing or two. I love using technology to improve my hunting. I guess I better add a GPS to my Christmas wish list.

@Brotsky..... if Pat is talking about turnips on his NY property, they will most likely be buried under three feet of snow by late January. The deer in that area have had it easy so far, but they are most likely to yard up within the next two weeks.

From: Brotsky
21-Dec-11
Pogo, in my experience here in SD that is when the deer hammer the turnips. Deep snow cover, etc. Deer behave differently in different areas. It's a lot easier for a deer here to eat waste corn in grain fields until the snow gets deep. Then digging down for a turnip is more rewarding then digging down for a kernel of corn or a single acorn.

From: Bowfreak
21-Dec-11
Pat,

Where is the general location of your Sanctuary and how did you create it or was it a natural safe zone? Also...how big is it?

21-Dec-11
Good read Pat. Some great practices. How far will the B&D pole saw extend to?

Thanks, Matt

From: Medicinemann
21-Dec-11
I would NOT want to be a song dog on Pat's property....especially now that Matt is "legal"!!

From: Bowfreak
21-Dec-11
Is it naturally thick or do deer just learn that they are 100% safe in this area over time? I guess my question is about developing a sanctuary....do you just arbitrarily locate a sanctuary and not step foot in that area or is there much more included into the equation.

21-Dec-11
Thanks Pat. I was looking at getting a Stihl pole saw, but this might be the ticket.

Matt

21-Dec-11
Still have 41 days remaining here. But, still a great article.

From: Mad Trapper
21-Dec-11
I have a Stihl pole pruner and a conventional Stihl chain saw. I often need both to get me out of trouble when a tree refuses to fall as planned. Am learning to use wedges to get trees to fall where I want them to. You will need the gas powered saws to do the big work, but I like the idea of battery power to complete smaller trimming jobs - particular as hunting season gets closer. They would not leave the gasoline scent. I am surprised that they last that long. I have got to get one!

From: GAFFER1
21-Dec-11
some good points for sure. I plan on heading out when we get snow. Usually by this time of year there is enough snow that almost all the deer leave the property I hunt for lower elevations. Already picked a spot for next year's tree stand and plan to do the heavy cutting soon. No food plots so natural food (acorns) and the yearly changed make every year different. Usually head out on snow shoes this year I could go out in sneakers.

From: DonSchultz
23-Dec-11
I also doubted the value of such electric saws. Need to take another look.

I got a new property to hunt just before the season opened and really didn't get to scout it. I hung one stand based on the land owner's opinion. When our season is closed and we have a snow, I'll scout using the excellent tips suggested here, including careful GPS work. I know I can get good aerial fotos from Google to help with the mapping.

Thanks for a helpful article.

24-Dec-11
The electric saw is interesting,, I have a gas one that works well but can be pain and is just messy..

Problem I have found with many of these battery operated tools is the batteries themselves.

If not used regularly they can go to heck over the year, then you find replacements cost more than the saw or that model has been discontinued..

I do have a battery operated saws-all that works well for trimming..

From: Genesis
25-Dec-11
Gas/Electric pole saws are great tools.I own a gas Stihl and can vouch that the noise smell doesn't keep deer away in the least on same day sits.

I had to be careful at first because it's so tempting to cut too much due to the ease.

Good luck with your piece of heaven!

From: crankn101
25-Dec-11
Nice thread.

25-Dec-11
Pat,

Is that an FX 3 in the picture with Matt?

  • Sitka Gear