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New Iron Will Single Bevel Broadheads
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
midwest 13-Jan-21
butcherboy 13-Jan-21
bowbender77 15-Jan-21
Jaquomo 15-Jan-21
APauls 15-Jan-21
Trial153 15-Jan-21
spike78 16-Jan-21
fran 26-Jan-21
wildwilderness 03-Mar-21
midwest 03-Mar-21
30 Feet Up 11-Sep-21
butcherboy 11-Sep-21
30 Feet Up 12-Sep-21
616Buck 15-Sep-21
616Buck 15-Sep-21
spike78 16-Sep-21
13-Jan-21

Bill V - Iron Will 's embedded Photo
Bill V - Iron Will 's embedded Photo

Bill V - Iron Will 's Link
We’ve had a lot of request for single bevels for a couple of years now. I've often said that a double bevel gives you a better combination of sharpness, edge retention and durability. This is inherent in the geometry and I have not changed my mind on this. It took a while to get a single bevel edge geometry that I was willing to stand behind with a lifetime warranty. The rotation of single bevels has been intriguing though. The theory here is that the pressure on one side of the blade creates a rotation which causes an S shaped cut through hide and tissue and pops bones further apart as it passes through. After consulting with Dr. Ashby and other single bevel advocates and testing a range of blade angles, we are launching a design that I believe will open up holes and slice more tissue without reducing penetration. Available for pre-order now and we start shipping in early March with and without single bevel bleeders.

From: midwest
13-Jan-21
Would these be very difficult to resharpen?

13-Jan-21

Bill V - Iron Will 's embedded Photo
Bill V - Iron Will 's embedded Photo
Here are my thoughts on the bleeder. To open up holes, I've always preferred our 2-blade with bleeder over a single bevel. Depending on the single bevel design, they can create an S cut which opens up holes better than a 2-blade double bevel with no bleeder, but not quite as well as a 2-blade with 3/4" bleeder in my experience. If you add a bleeder to a single bevel head it will reduce this rotation unless you make a bleeder with a single bevel grind also, which is what we've done. To me this could be the best of both worlds for opening up holes, getting S cuts in two directions as it rotates through. The holes through the hide become more open and circular and more tissue is cut all the way through the animal. I shot a buck a few weeks ago using the single bevel with bleeder and it looked like a faucet was turned on as the buck walked away. I'll post a video of this blood trail sometime. Based on the positive results, we've decided to offer them with and without bleeders [naming conventions is sb125 and sb125buff (no bleeder)].

13-Jan-21
Midwest, Single Bevels are pretty easy to re-sharpen. Compared to double bevels they are a little faster since you are running the stones on one side only with a single pass on the backside to remove any burr. You could touch up by hand on a fine stone. For thorough re-sharpening, I would remove the blades and use a knife sharpening kit using flat stones where you can set the angle like a KME. I was doing this yesterday and it only took a couple minutes per edge.

13-Jan-21

Bill V - Iron Will 's Link
Great testing video from Lusk Archery Adventures. Thanks for testing John!

From: butcherboy
13-Jan-21
Very nice! I’m a fan of single bevel broadheads. If I could afford these heads I would definitely shoot them. I blew through the thick part of an elk shoulder blade and exiting the opposite side just above the brisket bone. Massive damage and it definitely rotated.

From: bowbender77
15-Jan-21
Iron Will has a winner on this one from my point of view. FYI, a single bevel broadhead is not hard to sharpen with the correct tools. Good job Iron Will.

From: Jaquomo
15-Jan-21
This looks like a great head, Bill. I see that the rear edge is also single bevel on the same plane as the cutting edge. Is this a factor of geometry, or just for sharpening simplicity? Great job again!

From: APauls
15-Jan-21
Pretty cool man!!!

From: Trial153
15-Jan-21
Bill puts 100% into his designs. Nice work

From: spike78
16-Jan-21
Very interested now!

19-Jan-21
Hey Lou, I didn't want a squared off back edge. Fluid dynamic modeling shows this would create more turbulence and noise compared to a taped back edge. I also wanted the back edge to be sharp. Continuing the single bevel around the back edge created the best geometry for this. We are getting some great test results that I'll share here soon.

From: fran
26-Jan-21
Bill, I can't wait for the test results to come out . These heads look awesome and with the single bevel they should be easy to resharpen.

01-Mar-21

Bill V - Iron Will 's Link
We just posted a high speed video on our YouTube channel showing how our new single bevel broadheads continue to rotate while passing through a deer as well as some bones. Here is the link:

03-Mar-21
Would the tip be stronger with the single bevel?

I have had a tip break on the regular double bevel (which was replaced on warranty) it looks like a little thicker up front

From: midwest
03-Mar-21
The new Snyder Core system has me wanting to build some skinny shafts now. Dang you, Bill!

03-Mar-21
The tip has a short backside grind so that it comes to a point. I chose an angle to make the tip a little stronger than our current double bevel. It is looking very strong in my testing so far.

From: 30 Feet Up
11-Sep-21
Another great head - thanks! I've found that my cutthroat SB rotates in a foam target more than the Iron Will BS with bleeders. Is this anyone else's experience? Any reason for the apparent difference?

11-Sep-21
The bleeders probably slow the rotation

Man IW singles and all other brands are a pain to pull from a block type target due to the rotation And they tear up the foam more as a result

From: butcherboy
11-Sep-21
You have to push your broadhead all the way through the foam, unscrew it from your arrow, and then pull your arrow out. Mine always go all the way through so I just unscrew the broadhead and pull my arrow right out.

12-Sep-21
Our single bevel heads are available with or without the bleeders. The bleeders on our single bevel heads also have a single bevel grind, so they don't reduce rotation but rather assist with it. The bevel angle, size of the blade, and material you are passing through will determine how much rotation you get. I shot an elk with them two days ago and had the same square hole through the hide that I've had with the last two whitetails. The cross cut while spinning opens up holes nicely and provides more tissue damage. The elk went 17 yards after a double lung hit. I'll post a photo soon.

From: 30 Feet Up
12-Sep-21
Thanks! Nice on the deer, deer elk - were all those SB with bleeders? Sounds like an awesome wound, can't wait to get mine dirty

From: 616Buck
15-Sep-21
Ordered some last night, hopefully I will get to put them to work soon.

From: 616Buck
15-Sep-21
Ordered some last night, hopefully I will get to put them to work soon.

16-Sep-21

Bill V - Iron Will 's embedded Photo
Elk
Bill V - Iron Will 's embedded Photo
Elk
Bill V - Iron Will 's embedded Photo
Whitetail
Bill V - Iron Will 's embedded Photo
Whitetail
Yes, Single Bevel with bleeder created the square holes. Here are photos of my elk from last week and a deer from February. The deer died in a creek, so the blood was washed away.

From: spike78
16-Sep-21
Those are nice holes.

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