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Bow Stabilizers?
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
LoneWolf 14-Jul-21
wyobullshooter 14-Jul-21
Helgermite 14-Jul-21
Bowboy 14-Jul-21
WI Shedhead 14-Jul-21
LoneWolf 14-Jul-21
wyobullshooter 14-Jul-21
JTreeman 14-Jul-21
Bou'bound 14-Jul-21
rattling_junkie 14-Jul-21
Dale06 14-Jul-21
RD in WI 14-Jul-21
ElkNut1 14-Jul-21
DanaC 14-Jul-21
RD in WI 14-Jul-21
ElkNut1 14-Jul-21
RD in WI 14-Jul-21
wyobullshooter 14-Jul-21
ElkNut1 14-Jul-21
Highlife 14-Jul-21
carcus 15-Jul-21
From: LoneWolf
14-Jul-21
Do bow stabilizers really help relieve a jittery bow sight or do most hunters use them to quiet the bow? I know most competition shooters use ultra long ones so they must help improve accuracy. I'm trying to tighten my groups in the 30 - 40 yard range. I'm shooting a new Hoyt Ventum 33 w/ the short stabilizer that comes w/ the bow. Any suggestions on good ones and the best length & weight? I hunt mostly from a tree stand so I don't think the length will be an issue. Thanks

14-Jul-21
A stabilizer’s main function is to do just that…stabilize. Some may also dampen vibration, but that’s not their main purpose. Personally I prefer B-stinger stabilizers, but there are others as well. Whichever one you decide on, it should be adjustable so you can get your bow perfectly balanced. IMO, they most definitely help accuracy. Maybe not enough to notice at 20yds, but 30-40yds, yes.

From: Helgermite
14-Jul-21
Bee Stinger for me due to the adjustability and quick disconnect fitting. Definitely stabilizes my movement at full draw, absorbs what little recoil there is, and dampens the vibration at the shot.

From: Bowboy
14-Jul-21
I use both B-Stinger Micro 6” and Limbsaver 7” LS Hunter Lite. There both very lightweight and help stabilize when shooting past 40yds.

From: WI Shedhead
14-Jul-21
Just got a couple of cutter stabilizers, 10” upfront and 8” back at. The big difference in not having one is how fast target acquisition is when it’s all balanced. Well worth it imho

From: LoneWolf
14-Jul-21
Thanks for all the help guys...will definitely invest in one for the front and maybe try one on the back also.

14-Jul-21
Lone Wolf, check out the Bee Stinger Microhexx Counterslide. It’s a simple one-piece stabilizer that’s very effective for balancing your bow front to back and side to side. I switched from the Sport Hunter Extreme kit (front/rear stabilizer) last year and am very pleased with it.

From: JTreeman
14-Jul-21
Been shooting the b-stinger microhex counter slide (15”) for 4-5 years now. Highly recommend. It’s a not a full competition set-up, but gives lots of adjustability in a very simple design. I try to keep things relatively simple and reliable.

You really aren’t going to get a lot of “stabilization” from the shorter type stabs. My personal feeing is 8” out the front (with some weight out there) is really kinda minimum for most of us to see much “stabilization”.

That’s my 2 cents anyway

—Jim

From: Bou'bound
14-Jul-21
What does the micro hex counterside weigh

14-Jul-21
I bought some b-stinger micro-hex. Great stabilizer but took them off and shot just as good. For a hunting application I will not use them.

From: Dale06
14-Jul-21
I have 8” and 10” B Stingers on two different bows. Honestly, other than look sexy, and a little vibration dampening, I don’t think they do much.

From: RD in WI
14-Jul-21
I think the benefit of stabilizers depend on how you shoot. If you muscle the pin to the target and hit the release - they are no help. But if you float the pin and pull through the shot, they will help your pin stay on target. Look at what Olympic archers can accomplish with a recurve, SHOOTING FINGERS, and notice the stabilizer configurations they use.

From: ElkNut1
14-Jul-21
It's all in ones head, advertisement & money oriented in my opinion. Stabilizers are what many feel are crutches & a magic wand, they're neither. You will put as many critters down without them.

Just think of all the Deer & Elk taken without them! How about trad guys who take tons of Deer & Elk, do they use stabilizers? Of course not. Yes I've tried them, they do nothing for the hunter but if you are convinced they do then go for it, what's between the ears is a big part of the battle. Good luck!

ElkNut

From: DanaC
14-Jul-21
The front and side combo looks interesting, if you use a bow quiver. Can adjust the balance to compensate for weight that throws you off.

From: RD in WI
14-Jul-21
Putting down critters wasn't the crux of the thread - it was shooting better at 30-40 yards. To provide an example, my wife bought me a new bow for my 50th birthday present, which was vastly different from my previous bow. While aiming, my pin would drop out of the bullseye. I remedied this tendency by adding two ounces of weight to my back bar, which kept the pin on target. Properly configured, stabilizers will help with aiming.

From: ElkNut1
14-Jul-21
Ha Ha, it should be! We aren't Olympic shooters here. We have over 200 bulls down with the 5 of us here in ID & none of us have used a stabilizer on a single hunt. I'll stay with what works plus no need to haul around extra weight! Good Luck!

ElkNut

From: RD in WI
14-Jul-21
Elk hunting must easy

14-Jul-21
What RD in WI said, along with the point WI Shedhead brought up. Not only does it help with steadying pin float, but it makes for faster target acquisition since you don’t have to fight balance issues caused by sights and quiver once your bow is properly balanced. I can’t fathom how anyone can argue that doesn’t help in a hunting situation. If someone chooses not to use a stabilizer, fine. But saying they don’t aid accuracy, especially at distances beyond 20-25yds, simply isn’t true. Are they necessary to kill critters? Absolutely not. Will they improve accuracy? Absolutely.

From: ElkNut1
14-Jul-21
Wyobull, not arguing with anyone just saying with the time I've put behind one I've seen zero advantage out to 80 yards. If I did you can bet your rear I'd be onboard in a 2nd! So far I would not even consider packing one. I do just fine without them. No offense but I feel they are a gimmick! Folks don't have to agree, it's just my opinion! Use what gives you peace of mind!

ElkNut

From: Highlife
14-Jul-21
I tapped a cinderblock attached it to my recurve and it cleared up all my problems ;)

From: carcus
15-Jul-21
My tightspot quiver with 1500 grains of arrows acts as my stabilizer adding the needed weight for stabilization. I think shooting style makes a difference, if you pull through to a surprise release a stabilizer will help, if your a trigger puncher it won't do much

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