Wolves dropped from Federal payroll !
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
Buffalo1 06-Jan-22
Jaquomo 07-Jan-22
Mule Power 07-Jan-22
Rocky D 07-Jan-22
Rocky D 07-Jan-22
Treeline 07-Jan-22
txhunter58 07-Jan-22
Live2Hunt 07-Jan-22
Woods Walker 07-Jan-22
12yards 07-Jan-22
[email protected] 07-Jan-22
HDE 07-Jan-22
standswittaknife 07-Jan-22
HUNT MAN 07-Jan-22
greg simon 07-Jan-22
[email protected] 07-Jan-22
TD 07-Jan-22
ryanrc 07-Jan-22
[email protected] 07-Jan-22
Novembermadman 07-Jan-22
Tilzbow 07-Jan-22
walking buffalo 07-Jan-22
Bowfreak 08-Jan-22
KHNC 10-Jan-22
groundhunter50 10-Jan-22
From: Buffalo1
06-Jan-22
BILLINGS, Mont. – Twenty of Yellowstone National Park's renowned gray wolves roamed from the park and were shot by hunters in recent months — the most killed by hunting in a single season since the predators were reintroduced to the region more than 25 years ago, according to park officials. Fifteen wolves were shot after roaming across the park's northern border into Montana, according to figures released to The Associated Press. Five more died in Idaho and Wyoming. Park officials said in a statement to AP that the deaths mark “a significant setback for the species’ long-term viability and for wolf research." One pack — the Phantom Lake Pack — is now considered “eliminated” after most or all of its members were killed over a two-month span beginning in October, according to the park.

An estimated 94 wolves remain in Yellowstone. But with months to go in Montana's hunting season —- and wolf trapping season just getting underway — park officials said they expect more wolves to die after roaming from Yellowstone, where hunting is prohibited. Park Superintendent Cam Sholly first raised concerns last September about wolves dying near the park border. He recently urged Republican Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte to shut down hunting and trapping in the area for the remainder of the season. Sholly cited “the extraordinary number of Yellowstone wolves already killed this hunting season," in a Dec. 16 letter to Gianforte released to AP under a freedom of information request. Gianforte, an avid hunter and trapper, did not directly address the request to halt hunting in a Wednesday letter responding to Sholly.

“Once a wolf exits the park and enters lands in the State of Montana it may be harvested pursuant to regulations established by the (state wildlife) Commission under Montana law,” Gianforte wrote. Gianforte last year received a warning from a Montana game warden after trapping and shooting a radio-collared wolf about 10 miles (16 kilometers) north of the park without taking a state-mandated trapper education course. In his response to Sholly, the governor said Montana protects against overhunting through rules adopted by the wildlife commission, which can review hunting seasons if harvest levels top a certain threshold. For southwestern Montana, including areas bordering the park, that threshold is 82 wolves. Sixty-four have been killed in that region to date this season, out of 150 wolves killed statewide, according to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. The most recent wolf killing along the Montana-Yellowstone border happened on New Year's Day.

Wolf trapping in the area opened Dec. 21. Under new rules, Montana hunters can use bait such as meat to lure in wolves for killing and trappers can now use snares in addition to leghold traps. “Allowances for trapping and especially baiting are a major concern, especially if these tactics lure wolves out of the park,” Yellowstone spokesperson Morgan Warthin said. Urged by Republican lawmakers, Montana wildlife officials last year loosened hunting and trapping rules for wolves statewide. They also eliminated longstanding wolf quota limits in areas bordering the park. The quotas, which Sholly asked Gianforte to reinstate, allowed only a few wolves to be killed along the border annually. The original quotas were meant to protect packs that draw tourists to Yellowstone from around the world for the chance to see a wolf in the wild.

Montana's efforts to make it easier to kill wolves mirror recent actions by Republicans and conservatives in other states such as Idaho and Wisconsin. The changes came after hunters and ranchers successfully lobbied to reduce wolf populations that prey on big game herds and occasionally on livestock. But the states' increased aggression toward the predators has raised concerns among federal wildlife officials. In September, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said it would examine if federal endangered species protections should be restored for more than 2,000 wolves in northern U.S. Rockies states including Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. Protections for the region's wolves were lifted a decade ago, based in part on assurances the states would maintain viable wolf populations. A representative of the hunting industry said outfitters and guides support the preservation of wolves inside Yellowstone. But once the animals cross the boundary, sustainable hunting and trapping should be allowed, said Montana Outfitters and Guides Association Executive Director Mac Minard.

From: Jaquomo
07-Jan-22
That article just made my night!

From: Mule Power
07-Jan-22
What does the federal endangered species act have to do with an animal that is thriving across North America? This will be interesting to follow because I guarantee the wolf humpers are ready to spend millions to stop hunting again.

From: Rocky D
07-Jan-22
“Roaming out of park boundaries “

Sounds so innocent, shouldn’t it be expanding their range?

“ Montana's efforts to make it easier to kill wolves mirror recent actions by Republicans and conservatives in other states such as Idaho and Wisconsin. The changes came after hunters and ranchers successfully lobbied to reduce wolf populations that prey on big game herds and occasionally on livestock.”

Damn Republicans listening to their constituents! Albeit conservatives which is obviously a lower life form by merely wanting this to happen.

Sounds like democracy at work to me!

Hmm, wolves occasionally feed on livestock. I would venture to say that they would feed on livestock every time that the opportunity presented itself!

This is leftist dribble!

From: Rocky D
07-Jan-22
“Roaming out of park boundaries “

Sounds so innocent, shouldn’t it be expanding their range?

“ Montana's efforts to make it easier to kill wolves mirror recent actions by Republicans and conservatives in other states such as Idaho and Wisconsin. The changes came after hunters and ranchers successfully lobbied to reduce wolf populations that prey on big game herds and occasionally on livestock.”

Damn Republicans listening to their constituents! Albeit conservatives which is obviously a lower life form by merely wanting this to happen.

Sounds like democracy at work to me!

Hmm, wolves occasionally feed on livestock. I would venture to say that they would feed on livestock every time that the opportunity presented itself!

This is leftist dribble!

From: Treeline
07-Jan-22
Maybe we will get lucky and the rest of them will wander out of the park into Idaho or Montana…

From: txhunter58
07-Jan-22
We don't really want that. If they did, they would reinstitute controls on hunting again at the federal level. The trick is to keep some in the park (which actually is a good thing) and take care of the excess that "expands it range" outside the park

From: Live2Hunt
07-Jan-22
If any of you from Idaho or Montana could use some really long distance call lure on your traps to call them in from WI, I would really appreciate it!!!!

From: Woods Walker
07-Jan-22
Next the government will be putting them on planes and stocking them all over the country, like they do with illegal aliens.

From: 12yards
07-Jan-22
Perhaps they will resort to underground fencing around the park boundary.

07-Jan-22
txhunter is correct concerning the Feds and the ESA taking control again if the agreed upon wolf population falls below a designed population per state. Based on what I have been hearing here in Colorado, (social tolerance) there might never be a wolf hunt by hunters/ sportsmen to control the populations once established, like Montana, Idaho, Wyoming. But one biologist from out of state stated, the lethal control of the wolf population and or the lethal control of very aggressive wolves on livestock, is needed. The question might be, who is going to legally do it, once needed?

From: HDE
07-Jan-22
Oh. I thought schumer, pelsoi, and 10 other political scumbags finally resigned...

07-Jan-22
yes!

From: HUNT MAN
07-Jan-22
Sounds like a good place to start looking this weekend . Thanks for the heads up.

From: greg simon
07-Jan-22
Looks like Colorado just confirmed a case of wolves killing livestock. Makes you scratch your head on the "reintroduction" plans!!!!

07-Jan-22
Greg, the ballot box changed that from, OK if they just migrate in naturally, to, a forced reintroduction as we have now. Did not matter if a dozen or so wolves called Colorado their home. The pro-wolfers wanted more sooner. So here we are.

From: TD
07-Jan-22
Wolves would "wander out" for basically 2 reasons. There too many and other wolves push them out. Or game (food) within the park is reduced to the point it gets harder to eat them.

Either situation is reason for increased wolf management..... not less. Unless all common sense has left your body..... or you're from CA....

From: ryanrc
07-Jan-22
Agreed TD. Why are so many leaving the bountiful Yellowstone....?

07-Jan-22
"why were some of the wolves leaving Yellowstone?" Following taken from a study concerning the Madison elk herd. The last sentence says it all.

"Wolves recolonizing the Madison headwaters area strongly preferred elk as prey and killed comparatively fewer bison, even though bison were more abundant than elk from midwinter through spring. Bison kills were more frequent during late winter when animals were in poorer condition. The wolves’ preference for elk probably reflects the formidable challenge of killing bison, which form groups to aggressively and cooperatively defend themselves and their young. In contrast, elk do not use group defenses and generally flee when attacked. Wolves strongly selected calves and older elk, which are the age classes most vulnerable to starvation mortality during winters of average to severe snow pack. However, the survival of elk calves was lower and less variable among years after wolf numbers increased, suggesting predation limited the recruitment of animals into the breeding population. The survival of adult female elk was 5-15% lower following wolf recolonization, primarily in the middle to older age classes. The diets and nutrition of elk remained similar to those prior to the arrival of wolves. Elk pregnancy rates remained high, but elk abundance decreased rapidly as breeding females were killed and wolf predation on calves consistently reduced recruitment to low levels. As elk numbers decreased due to wolf predation, wolf kill rates remained high and wolf numbers continued to grow. As a result, predation removed a higher portion of the elk population each year until elk became scarce. Thereafter, wolf kill rates decreased, strife among packs increased, wolf numbers declined, and packs began to hunt elsewhere for most of the year."

07-Jan-22
We used to make deer drives growing up..... anybody want to join me in making a wolf drive?

From: Tilzbow
07-Jan-22
“Allowances for trapping and especially baiting are a major concern, especially if these tactics lure wolves out of the park,” Yellowstone spokesperson Morgan Warthin said.

Those must be some good tactics!

07-Jan-22
Keep those wolf numbers down if you want to have ungulates in the mountains.

Alberta mountain elk, moose and mule deer have been reduced by predation, mostly by wolves, to less than 10% of their population in the 1980-90's. Hunting Elk in the Alberta mountains is pretty much just a memory now.

From: Bowfreak
08-Jan-22
Just checking in to see if the famous apologist C.S. Lupus had shown up yet.....

From: KHNC
10-Jan-22
This was written by Defenders of Wildlife organization. 2.2 million members and growing. Completely leftist. Probably have a Trump dart board too.

10-Jan-22
'When this winter ends the wolves will have destroyed the moose population, of Isle Royale

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