Sitka Gear
Teach me about Tractors-
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
wildwilderness 18-Feb-22
JohnMC 18-Feb-22
Huntiam 18-Feb-22
t-roy 18-Feb-22
APauls 18-Feb-22
drycreek 18-Feb-22
Jeff.Thomp 18-Feb-22
t-roy 18-Feb-22
deerhunter72 18-Feb-22
wildwilderness 18-Feb-22
drycreek 18-Feb-22
t-roy 18-Feb-22
Quinn @work 18-Feb-22
jstephens61 19-Feb-22
t-roy 19-Feb-22
jstephens61 19-Feb-22
Grey Ghost 19-Feb-22
wildwilderness 19-Feb-22
Wildan2 19-Feb-22
jjs 19-Feb-22
Grasshopper 19-Feb-22
Buck Watcher 19-Feb-22
Medicinemann 19-Feb-22
Missouribreaks 19-Feb-22
Pop-r 19-Feb-22
Lost Arra 19-Feb-22
Missouribreaks 19-Feb-22
JusPassin 19-Feb-22
kokosing 19-Feb-22
t-roy 19-Feb-22
Missouribreaks 19-Feb-22
Lost Arra 19-Feb-22
wildwilderness 19-Feb-22
Lost Arra 19-Feb-22
Pat Lefemine 19-Feb-22
Norseman 19-Feb-22
Norseman 19-Feb-22
drycreek 19-Feb-22
drycreek 19-Feb-22
Katahdin 19-Feb-22
wildwilderness 19-Feb-22
Kurt 19-Feb-22
Missouribreaks 19-Feb-22
JSW 19-Feb-22
t-roy 19-Feb-22
t-roy 19-Feb-22
t-roy 19-Feb-22
t-roy 19-Feb-22
Norseman 19-Feb-22
Hancock West 19-Feb-22
t-roy 19-Feb-22
deerhunter72 19-Feb-22
Franzen 20-Feb-22
Grey Ghost 20-Feb-22
t-roy 20-Feb-22
Pat Lefemine 20-Feb-22
Cowdoc 20-Feb-22
[email protected] 20-Feb-22
Pat Lefemine 20-Feb-22
Wirehair 20-Feb-22
Norseman 20-Feb-22
Grey Ghost 20-Feb-22
Norseman 20-Feb-22
Norseman 22-Feb-22
Glunker 22-Feb-22
LINK 22-Feb-22
KHNC 22-Feb-22
Hancock West 22-Feb-22
x-man 22-Feb-22
Cowdoc 22-Feb-22
Glunker 22-Feb-22
Norseman 22-Feb-22
elkmtngear 22-Feb-22
Breakfast Boy 22-Feb-22
Kurt 22-Feb-22
Norseman 22-Feb-22
JSW 22-Feb-22
JSW 22-Feb-22
JSW 22-Feb-22
petedrummond 23-Feb-22
solo hunter19 23-Feb-22
solo hunter19 23-Feb-22
KHNC 23-Feb-22
polokerton 19-Sep-22
gflight 19-Sep-22
APauls 19-Sep-22
Pat Lefemine 19-Sep-22
Ambush 19-Sep-22
fuzzy 20-Sep-22
keepemsharp 20-Sep-22
Highlife 20-Sep-22
Medicinemann 20-Sep-22
Medicinemann 20-Sep-22
fuzzy 21-Sep-22
GhostBird 21-Sep-22
Highlife 21-Sep-22
fuzzy 21-Sep-22
Joey Ward 22-Sep-22
Joey Ward 22-Sep-22
Joey Ward 22-Sep-22
Grey Ghost 22-Sep-22
Norseman 22-Sep-22
M.Pauls 22-Sep-22
Joey Ward 22-Sep-22
Medicinemann 22-Sep-22
deerhunter72 22-Sep-22
fuzzy 22-Sep-22
Joey Ward 22-Sep-22
t-roy 22-Sep-22
drycreek 22-Sep-22
18-Feb-22
If I were to start working about 10-15 acres of ideal food plots in northern KS, where do I start?

What size tractor? What implements?

From: JohnMC
18-Feb-22
Get a John Deere 9R 390

From: Huntiam
18-Feb-22
you can plow with a disk you can’t disk with a plow . A cutter and a disk you can do a hell of a lot

From: t-roy
18-Feb-22
What’s your budget? What plots are you putting in?

From: APauls
18-Feb-22
Hey John what do you recommend for 50 acres? Lol

From: drycreek
18-Feb-22
I wouldn’t want less than a 60 hp nor probably more than a 90 hp tractor. Brands are gonna be subjective, just like Ford, Chevy, and Dodge. I like Kubota because I’ve had two of them and they’re good tractors. I have no idea about your terrain but your implements need to match the openings you’re gonna take them through. A 60 hp tractor will easily pull 6’ implements and a 90 will do the same with 8’-10’ implements for the most part. There are several ways to plant: throw and mow, disc and broadcast, or no till drill, as well as a couple variations within. I do what I call minimum tillage, which means that I disc as little as possible and as shallow as possible, the idea being to preserve the microbes and earthworms as best as I can. I can’t afford a $10/$15,000 drill just to plant food plots, and throw and mow won’t work for me so I’m stuck with my method. It works well though. Good luck !

From: Jeff.Thomp
18-Feb-22
I have a Kubota m6800 hd and its a solid little tractor. I farm about 40 acres with it and its small enough to move. The big decision is if its a farm tractor or a mobile tractor. If you haul it much a 30-40 horse will be a much better option. A friend food plots everything with a 33 horse Kubota and it works great with an 8 foot disc and its very portable.

From: t-roy
18-Feb-22
A 60-90 hp tractor would be plenty of hp for most all of your needs.

As far as implements, if you can find one, a 10’-14’ cultipacker or cultimulcher is a “must have”, IMO. A 3 point tiller is super handy as well. A 12’-14’ disc. The heavier, the better, as long as you have enough hp to pull it. A 6’-10’ (or wider) brush mower. A 10’-15’ boom sprayer. For row crops, a JD 7000 planter.

Farm consignment sales are a great place to pick up the perfect food plot sized implements, oftentimes on the cheap, unless scrap iron prices are high. They’re way too small for today’s big ag production. If you keep your eyes open, lots of times , farmers have these types of implements sitting out in their farmyards, just rusting away. Sometimes you can get something bought from them reasonably priced, as well.

That should get you started ;-)

From: deerhunter72
18-Feb-22
I think the 9R might be overkill and blow the budget! Depends on your budget and what your goals are for the plots. Also will depend on what kind of time you have to work at it.

For example, my dad and I got 15 acres worked up pretty good with a Case Dx33 and a 6.5 king kutter disc. I had had the ground cleared of locust trees with a excavator and a dozer and then we went to work. Dad worked up small pieces at a time going over and over with the disc and I was on the ground with an axe cutting out roots. It was brutal work but we got it done and the ground is in good shape now. If I had a small planter and sprayer I could have some great plots but I have 27 acres of tillable and I have it all farmed.

18-Feb-22
Wanted a starting place to know what the budget should entail.

This first year if everything goes through will probably pay someone to work it for me until I can save up to get my own equipment

From: drycreek
18-Feb-22
^^^^That would be a good idea, and I started to suggest it. That would be good in two ways, first you could save some money, second, you can see what you need as far as implements go.

From: t-roy
18-Feb-22

t-roy's embedded Photo
Cabs are for sissies!
t-roy's embedded Photo
Cabs are for sissies!
The most expensive piece of equipment will obviously, be the tractor. You don’t have to spend ton on a tractor, starting out. You can buy an older tractor that will do you a great job for $3,000 to $15,000 to start out with, vs $25,000-$50,000. Lots of older 60s-70s model, International, Allis Chalmers, Massey Ferguson, or my favorite, John Deere, tractors that will suit your needs. Preferably a diesel. I LOVE my 4020!

From: Quinn @work
18-Feb-22
So did you buy that ground you posted on here asking for suggestions on?

From: jstephens61
19-Feb-22
I want to know where you find a 4020 for $3k!

From: t-roy
19-Feb-22
Jstephens61……Me too! I’d buy another one! ;-)

I put a fairly wide price range in there, to cover several bases. A nice 4020 is gonna be at the high end of that range (probably another $5-10K more for a “parade ready” unit) I was lucky, and bought the 4020 that my dad is setting on in the above pic, for $6,500 at a farm consignment auction 17-18 years ago. I had to put new tires all the way around, which at that time was approximately another $1,500, plus a few minor things over the years, but for the most part, it has been bulletproof for me. They definitely hold their value.

From: jstephens61
19-Feb-22
I bought my gas 4020 with a 6’ blade and 5’ bush hog for $3,500 about 15 years ago. Been offered 3X that now. Had a new wiring harness built for it last year. She runs great, but could use a new paint job.

From: Grey Ghost
19-Feb-22

Grey Ghost's embedded Photo
Grey Ghost's embedded Photo
I don't have a ton of farming experience, but I love my little New Holland TC45D. For me, the frontend loader is probably the most useful attachment I have. I plow snow, grade, and haul a variety of different things with it. It also makes a good hoist for engines, and deer.

I built about 3/4 of a mile of 3-rail fence using my post-hole digger implement. I also pull a 72" rototiller behind my tractor that makes short work of grooming our horse arena when it gets hard and weedy.

Good luck,

Matt

19-Feb-22
Things I’m learning-

A bigger tractor- as in horse power can pull bigger, heavier implements.

The bigger the implements the faster I can work a field.

I need to make sure it will all fit through access points

From: Wildan2
19-Feb-22
go to www.tractorbynet.com for hours of reading.We use a 44 HP and 30 HP on our 100 acres.Kubota is our brand choice.Used tractors are very expensive right now.

From: jjs
19-Feb-22
Worked at John Deere Waterloo Tractor Works through the 70s and the 4020 was a good tough series that was made then the 50 and the big 80s series came along and then I left for Alaska just before the big layoff, remember they had 7000 tractors back up in their lot.

Just a suggestion, if you want to save money, talk to one of your neighbors and hire out to come in to do your custom work, it may give you another hunting access.

From: Grasshopper
19-Feb-22

Grasshopper's embedded Photo
Grasshopper's embedded Photo
Loaders and buckets are so nice.

I mainly cut, had a cabless tractor, the dust was unbearable, I like being able to breathe, a heated and cooled cab is so nice!

Hate using it on a hill, too tippy.

From: Buck Watcher
19-Feb-22
My next tractor will be a John Deere 2032Turbo. With a cab, loader, back blade, 60" snow blower and 60" mower. About $30K

From: Medicinemann
19-Feb-22
I'd strongly recommend 4WD and a front loader....

19-Feb-22
I would go with a newer, or new, 4WD in the 40-60HP range. It is not all about HP. Kubota makes some real nice mid level machines, but they are relatively lightweight in construction.

From: Pop-r
19-Feb-22
Those 4020's are the bomb! They do drink some fuel though compared to modern diesels.

From: Lost Arra
19-Feb-22
Buying a tractor is like buying land, get more than you think you need. No tractor owner ever said "I wish I had less horsepower". Front end loader is probably the best invention ever. I look for projects to use it.

19-Feb-22
I agree with Lost Arra on that one.

From: JusPassin
19-Feb-22
I take care of a 30 acre tree farm as well as miles of logging trails. It's all done with a Kubota 35/40, brush hog, disk, and loader. And even that is more tractor than you really need. Guys who are advocating 70 to 90 horse tractors, well that's just nuts.

From: kokosing
19-Feb-22
With 50 acres we bought a 2640 John Deere 78 h.p. with a loader 5 years ago for $8,000.00. Dad had a 1941 B with 25 h.p and plowed 200 acres and farmed it too. He had to ride it all day and of a lot of nights. Most farmers today won't take the time to do your pot.

From: t-roy
19-Feb-22
I’m glad that I don’t have a bucket on my 4020. It’s a bit of a PITA, maneuvering around with one in a small plot, IMO. I’ve got a 73hp Bobcat skid loader for when I need to do any work involving a bucket. The skid works way better for those applications. If I only had a tractor, I’d definitely want a bucket on it, then.

19-Feb-22
Also, depending on soil of course, for serious food plotting I have found value in the rototiller.

From: Lost Arra
19-Feb-22
Most compact and mid-size Kubotas use skid steer quick-attach buckets. When you need to maneuver just remove the bucket. Mine comes off in seconds. That system opens up a lot of other possible skid steer attachments. John Deere has their own proprietary quick attach system so all your attachments will be painted green. No problem with that but you are limited to JD attachments.

19-Feb-22
Are there places that rent implements? Is that worth it or is trying to buy them better?

From: Lost Arra
19-Feb-22
Implement rental is probably dependent on your location. There are literally tons of used implements for sale ranging from like-new to scrap iron and looks can be deceiving. I've got a 5' Rhino brush hog that is 25 years old that I bought new. It looks terrible but works perfectly. I just wish it was 6'

From: Pat Lefemine
19-Feb-22
I would never own a tractor without a loader bucket. I use mine constantly.

I own four tractors for my hunting properties. For the size property you have I’d look for anything from 34hp-55. Should be plenty. One of my favorite tractors is my New Holland TC 34. Which I bought used for 13k. It’s easy to truck around and lots of dealer support and parts.

Understand that all compacts are made overseas including Deere.

From: Norseman
19-Feb-22

Norseman 's embedded Photo
Norseman 's embedded Photo
I got this 1971 JD 1020 for $3k Found a model 47 loader for it for $1k. Old school gear driven and will out pull a newer hydro static tractor with 10 more horsepower hands down.

5’ heigh clearance and only 70 inches wide, turns on a dime. Got a 6’ rotary 3 point tiller that works great for most of my smaller hard to reach plots.

From: Norseman
19-Feb-22

From: drycreek
19-Feb-22
^^^^That would be a good idea, and I started to suggest it. That would be good in two ways, first you could save some money, second, you can see what you need as far as implements go.

From: drycreek
19-Feb-22
I guess I’m a sissy, but I wouldn’t ever buy another tractor without a cab. Mowing in 100* weather ain’t my idea of fun ! Another thing I won’t ever do without is a front loader. My M6040 Kubota has a quick disconnect hitch and I can be off my bucket and on my forks in 5 minutes or less. Very handy, because I probably use the forks more than the bucket. I have four bow blinds that I made myself that takes about three guys to move, but with the forks on the tractor it’s a one man job. If I have serious front bucket work, I have a JD 310 backhoe for that, but the bucket on my tractor is sure handy when I’m mowing on the lease and come across a tree down on the road.

From: Katahdin
19-Feb-22
Another thing to consider with implements is the pto. When you get close to 50hp the pto goes from 540 rpm to 1000 rpm and they are not interchangeable

19-Feb-22
The property I am under contract on is 186 acres. 10 acres is already planted in food plots. There is another 3 acre field that is cleared, but hasn’t been planted in a while. There is potential for another 1-2 small plots in the future.

My long term goal would be to buy the neighbors 200 acres, or another piece or two nearby. That may involve moving the tractor if not adjacent.

From: Kurt
19-Feb-22
You can buy an adaptor for your QD (Quick Detach) propriety JD loader frame so it takes standard QD standard skid steer buckets or forks, etc.

I bought one for my JD4600 (43 HP, MFD) so I could use a rock bucket (tines on 2-3/4" centers) and non-JD forks. Works fine, and the only drawback to the adaptor is a bit of loss of lifting capacity due to the weight of it. The adaptor lives on the rock bucket and I can switch between it and the JD QD bucket in about 2 minutes.

I do not food plot but have used the JD for snow removal in Leadville, CO plus landscaping and brush hogging sage there. The hydrostatic transmission is great for that. Also have used it around our build and acreage in BC. Great for maintaining a gravel driveway and landscaping as I got a JD 48 backhoe and it lives on the tractor. Super handy attachment, though you have to remove the 3-point hitch to attach it to the frame and rear axle. I leave it on full time as it adds 1700#s of rear weight...great for more traction and counter-balance when moving full buckets of rocks or gravel. Wouldn't be good for food plotting though, no rear implements.

19-Feb-22
With that kind of investment into land, and the number of potential plots, I would invest into some good farming equipment. Renting is possible, but typically different plots and crops are planted at different times of the spring and summer. All this happens around weather patterns, which to do it right, requires flexibility. That makes it difficult to rent and have the right equipment available, and at the correct times. If you are serious, and if it was up to me, I would invest into a reliable 40 -50 HP 4WD tractor with loader. I would also consider a heavy duty rototiller, roller, mower and an implement to plant. Planting depends on crop type and many simply broadcast and roll in the seed. Other crops such as corn, soybean and certain grains typically do better with a row planter.

There are many ways to prep and plant soil, I would take into account your time, budget, crop types and of course there will be maintenance on the tractor and equipment. Are you a good mechanic, or will you depend on available local service. Again, there are many correct ways to food plot. This is not production Ag, but why not do the best you can with your available resources, and limitations?

From: JSW
19-Feb-22
I have a John Deere 1050, 35HP 4WD, 1985 model with a loader. You can get that machine for under $10K depending on condition. It is small and really handy and all I need for my 5-8 acres of food plots. 10-15 acres might be a little much but it can certainly be done if you have the time. As stated above, a 4020 or similar tractor would be plenty but for 10-15 acres, that's a pretty big machine.

A lot of what YOU want depends on your ability to make repairs. I'm fine with a 35 year old tractor because I can fix anything that goes wrong. Can you do that? Do you need something newer that should not need any repairs for a while.

I really like my little 1050. I've also owned a 4020 with a loader and it's just too big for food plots. 30-60 HP with front wheel assist is perfect. You have to have a loader, mower and disc. You can do a lot with minimal equipment.

From: t-roy
19-Feb-22

t-roy's embedded Photo
disk that I picked up for $1,200
t-roy's embedded Photo
disk that I picked up for $1,200
Totally disagree, JSW. (at least in my situation) All but 2 micro plots, of my total of 20 acres in plots are accessible with my 4020 and the equipment that I have. Several plots are 3-5 acres in size. I’m blessed that I live within 2 miles of all of my farms, however, I’m often gone all week long from April-October, so timing can be critical for me to get stuff worked/mowed/planted, when I am home on the weekends. I’m certain that I would not get all of my plots done with smaller equipment than what I have. All of them are done totally by myself, only, other than a little help from my wife, who will run me out to various plots, pick me up, and occasionally run seed/food/etc out to me (she is definitely a BIG help!)

From: t-roy
19-Feb-22

t-roy's embedded Photo
6 row 30” cultivator
t-roy's embedded Photo
6 row 30” cultivator
I bought this 6 row cultivator for $75 at a farm sale last spring. Nobody cultivates anymore, but if the farm chemical prices keep going sky high (IF you can find any!) I might be putting it to good use this year.

From: t-roy
19-Feb-22

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Field cultivator. It makes a nice smooth seed bed, if you don’t have a lot of trash in the field.

From: t-roy
19-Feb-22

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Cultimulcher. My favorite piece of equipment that I own.

From: Norseman
19-Feb-22
Nice TRoy I got some neighbor farmers that I am going to door knock and ask them if I can look around some of their old implementss they got hiding in the overgrown windbreaks they got. Amazed what you can find and get for cheap if not free.

From: Hancock West
19-Feb-22
Get something you dont have to work on all the time. We have a JD 4310 but id get bigger with a plot that size. If you dont want to eat dust id get a cab too. Dont buy something youll regret bc then you be buying twice

From: t-roy
19-Feb-22
Definitely, Norseman! In farm country, there’s a lot of good plot sized implements sitting back in the weeds, just rusting away. I’m extremely fortunate that, in my hometown, there’s an auctioneer that always has a spring farm consignment auction, and oftentimes has one in the fall as well. The best part is, the farmers drag it all in to one spot, and I don’t have to go searching for it. My wife accuses me of having Tourette’s every time I go to the sale ;-)

BTW……LOVE your little 1020! I’ve got a 2010 that I use to spray with, 3point spreader, and sometimes pull my planter with it. I just wish it was a diesel.

From: deerhunter72
19-Feb-22
You’ve got a great setup t-roy. I’d be following your advice if I were looking at doing 10-20 acres worth of plots.

From: Franzen
20-Feb-22
Troy that looks a lot like my grandpa's lineup from farming in the '80s... single gang wings on the disk.

From: Grey Ghost
20-Feb-22
Another nice benefit of owning a tractor with a loader/bucket is it can endear you to your neighbors who may not have one. Every time we have a 12" or greater snowfall, I plow the snow from 2 of my neighbors driveways, which are about 1/4 of a mile long. The only thing I ask for in return is to be allowed to hunt their properties, which they are happy to agree to. It's a win win for all of us, especially since I really enjoy pushing snow around with my tractor. 4WD is a must, IMO.

I just looked up the used value for my 2001 New Holland TC45D and was pleasantly surprised to see that they are selling for nearly what I paid for mine new. There's not many pieces of equipment that you can say that about.

Matt

From: t-roy
20-Feb-22
My 4020, as is, would bring nearly double what it sold for brand new.

Franzen……It’s a LOT better lineup than what we farmed 160 acres with, back in the 60s and 70s! A 720 JD, then a 706 Farmall. The only new piece of equipment my dad ever bought, was a JD 494 planter. Fortunately, he didn’t make his living, farming. He had a couple of other businesses as well. Funny thing is, we also fed out a few hundred head of fat cattle, plus hogs. I always enjoyed feeding cattle, but HATED sitting on a tractor back then. Now I thoroughly enjoy it.

From: Pat Lefemine
20-Feb-22

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Used tractor prices are crazy high right now. I’m so glad I bought this in June 2020 or I’d pay 20k more.

My 2003 Deere 450H dozer has 2050 hours on it. I bought it used for 22k 6 years ago. My neighbor offered me 35k for it. That’s a 13k profit after using it for years. Simply crazy what’s happening now.

From: Cowdoc
20-Feb-22
Before buying a tractor, I would determine who you want to provide service and parts. If the John Deere dealership is in your town but New Holland is two hours away, it becomes a pain to own the New Holland, even if you get a great deal.

20-Feb-22
Our small one is a Massey 4700 series. Real nice but not cheap.

We accomplished a lot with some late 60's Farmalls (544 & 656) before we bought some newer and bigger tractors. You have to work on the older ones to keep them running but they are simple.

A good dealer in the area is key for us because down time is expensive. Probably not as big a factor for plots.

From: Pat Lefemine
20-Feb-22
Cowdoc,

I agree with that unless you’re comfortable doing your own repairs. I can order parts and have them delivered about as fast as my dealer can and I do 80-90% of my own repairs.

Along that same line, one very important thing to consider and it burned me is the availability of parts. I own a McCormic X.10-55 and while it’s been a great tractor, getting parts has been a nightmare. They only made the tractor for 3 years then discontinued it. I needed a clutch and it took me 3 months to get one from South Korea. There’s probably 30% of that tractor that I’ll never find replacement parts for. Thankfully it’s been reliable but it’s the last time I buy a tractor without confirming parts will be readily available.

From: Wirehair
20-Feb-22

Wirehair's embedded Photo
Wirehair's embedded Photo
I use a 35hp kioti. Amazing what I can do with it. Grapple, tiller, flail mower.

20-Feb-22

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Lots of great advice here. I own a 45 hp and 75 hp NH. I do my work on the 45, but the 75 is a 4th generation diesel and more difficult to work on. Deere dealers are typically more numerous, so this is a consideration IMO.

I like to use the closed cab for spreading fertilizer and spraying chemicals, it keeps the junk off you. Air ride seat for a bad back and climate control work wonders.

I am also of the mindset to get more than you think you would need. I would not pull this loaded hopper with my 45, nor do I want to spread fertilizer with a broadcaster I have to load at age 63.

Good luck!

20-Feb-22

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
The 45. Very versatile and agile.

From: Norseman
20-Feb-22
Nice Riggs guys. I love twactors!

From: Grey Ghost
20-Feb-22
That 75 NH is nice Frank. Do you trailer it much?

I have a related question. Have any of you replaced the cutting edge on your loader buckets? Mine is welded on, and its width has worn down to about 25% of what it was when new. I'd like to replace it before I do any damage to the bucket itself. I have the necessary grinders and cut off wheels to get it off, and I think I can order a new edge. However, my MIG welder is only rated up to 1/4" steel, so this project would be testing its limits, and I'm an amateur welder at best. Have any of you done this project yourself, or is this a job for a professional welder/fabricator?

Matt

From: Norseman
20-Feb-22
You could always drill and bolt the cutting edge on.

From: Norseman
22-Feb-22

From: Glunker
22-Feb-22
Lots of good ideas but varying. If I can weigh in on your tractor choice go with 4 wheel drive, a bucket, hydraulics in back, diesel, roll bar and buy new from a local dealer. Tractor will hold it value it not beat. Get a brush hog, disc or tiller. 50 hp should work.

From: LINK
22-Feb-22

LINK's embedded Photo
LINK's embedded Photo
I bought a 2440 for small jobs . Under 4000 hours, 80 hp for $6000 last summer.

From: KHNC
22-Feb-22

KHNC's Link
Whatever tractor you decide on, you should check into getting one of these ratchet rakes. I have done all kinds of projects with mine on the bucket. Smoothing ground, ripping up small saplings, clearing leaves, leveling my driveway....countless things. Best money i have spent on attachments. They are tough as hell also, and easily removable.

From: Hancock West
22-Feb-22
2 nice tractors Habitat!

From: x-man
22-Feb-22
Should be lots of JD 2510's around. Ours was the best tractor we had. Smaller and more nimble than our 4020 (same platform, 25% smaller) and plenty for 60 acres or less. Available in gas or diesel. Around 45-50 HP I think. I spent hundreds of hours pulling a three-bottom trip plow with ours....

From: Cowdoc
22-Feb-22
Glunk nailed it.

From: Glunker
22-Feb-22
Thanks Cowdoc For what it is worth, this winter I ordered a Woodmaxx 84" pto driven snowblower to attach to the back of my tractor. You plow in reverse but this is a brute of a blower. Hand crank turns the chute effortlessly. You want one at least as wide as your tractor. Could turn your tractor into a writeoff for your blowing snow at your business property. Could be a neighborhood sideline. Unlike plowing, during a heavy snow winter, you do not run out of places to push snow.

From: Norseman
22-Feb-22
Nice rig, Link!

Thanks for the tip Kenny. Looks like a great tool to have for a bucket!

From: elkmtngear
22-Feb-22

elkmtngear's embedded Photo
elkmtngear's embedded Photo
"Whatever tractor you decide on, you should check into getting one of these ratchet rakes"

Good call, Kenny...I could use one of those things!

Bought this 55 HP Jinma, in "chunks", had to assemble it in my workshop, using an overhead crane I made. Took me a while, but it's been pretty reliable.

22-Feb-22

Breakfast Boy's embedded Photo
Breakfast Boy's embedded Photo
Inexpensive, parts are readily available, fairly simple to work on yourself, and 3 point attachments are easily purchased used for a reasonable price.

From: Kurt
22-Feb-22
Tractordata.com shows the JD 2510 at about 55 PTO HP and 2440 at 61 PTO HP.

From: Norseman
22-Feb-22
Breakfast, is that a Jubilee?

From: JSW
22-Feb-22

JSW's embedded Photo
7010 with grass seeder
JSW's embedded Photo
7010 with grass seeder

From: JSW
22-Feb-22

JSW's embedded Photo
1050 on trailer
JSW's embedded Photo
1050 on trailer

From: JSW
22-Feb-22
I have 2 tractors in Kansas. See above pictures. One is a 7010 with a loader and the other is a 1050, much smaller. I use the 1050 3 or 4 times as much as the 7010. The 7010 is 100 HP and the 1050 is 35 HP. the 7010 pulls a 16'disc, the 1050 pulls a 6' disc. HP wise, the 7010 is just a little bigger than a 4020. It's just too big to be practical for a lot of food plot projects. I stick with my above suggestion that you should lean towards a smaller tractor.

The 1050 fits on a small, tandem axle trailer and I pull it all over the place with a mower or disc. The bigger one requires a goose neck, dually trailer and really takes some effort to move it around.

From: petedrummond
23-Feb-22
Find a farm kid to do it for three hundred bux. No tractor no storage no implements no maintenance.

23-Feb-22
Grass hopper I have a Kubota also and had the same issue of it being tippy on side hills. I flipped the rear wheels around and gave it a wider stance and it made a huge difference.

23-Feb-22
Grass hopper I have a Kubota also and had the same issue of it being tippy on side hills. I flipped the rear wheels around and gave it a wider stance and it made a huge difference.

From: KHNC
23-Feb-22
Dang Jeff, thats a nice tractor! Looks like you did a killer job getting it all rigged out! The Ratchet Rake would be awesome on a 55hp like that one! I have literally done all kinds of brush and briar clearing with mine. Then when i need to scrape my driveway, i used my blade and then use the RR in reverse and back down the drive. It levels it great.

From: polokerton
19-Sep-22
Well, ten acres isn't too far away to buy a tractor that's too powerful and cool to stand idle. So if I were you, I'd go for the more compact options. These small tractors can then be used on the farm to transport livestock and goods. I've even driven a tractor like this a few times to go fishing. Compact tractors like https://www.machinerydealer.co.uk are quiet enough, so you won't wake up the neighbors, the kids wife, or even the fish in the pond. Want my opinion on the rest? I don't like big, loud appliances. I haven't had to deal with something like a John Deere in years because I don't like them. I hope there are some users here in solidarity with me.

From: gflight
19-Sep-22
Few questions....

How much woods/maneuvering will you do??

Where will you store tractor?

How will you transport?

From what my perception is so far I would go along the lines of Jeff.T, Missouri breaks, and Pat.

Smaller versatile.

Sometimes the convenience of saving a few passes is not in your best interest overall.

I would get a front loader. Most newer tractors have bobcat style quick release.

Put on a bucket, take off a bucket, put on a grapple, take off a grapple, forklift, bale spike, etc.

Good luck in your research.

From: APauls
19-Sep-22
I understand this is a loaded question. But getting in the range of 30-35HP what size a disc can a guy pull? Should you want to work over let's say a 5 acre field how long would that take on average?

From: Pat Lefemine
19-Sep-22
Apauls, hard to answer without knowing things like unbroken ground, soil characteristics, but generally speaking the formula is 8HP per foot of disk harrow.

So 6' disk would need 48HP tractor.

From: Ambush
19-Sep-22

Ambush's embedded Photo
Ambush's embedded Photo
Ambush's embedded Photo
And t-roy definitely has cultipacker envy. Might be able to finally grow himself a decent whitetail
Ambush's embedded Photo
And t-roy definitely has cultipacker envy. Might be able to finally grow himself a decent whitetail
I dunno about that formula Pat. I have 3 1/2 feet of disc and only 14 hp. With that and a 14 hp tiller, I bet I can work through a half acre in two good days.

Well if it’s the same ground I worked before. ;)

From: fuzzy
20-Sep-22

fuzzy's embedded Photo
fuzzy's embedded Photo
Mid-70s model 165 Massey Ferguson with Bush Hog brand quick detachable loader. 50 hp, 4 cylinder Perkins diesel, 4 speed transmission with high and low gives 8 forward and 2 reverse gears, differential lock gets you out of most spots. I've got a 5 foot roto tiller, 2 bottom mold board plow, two row corn planter, 5 foot brush hog and removable bucket forks. Primary use is at the sawmill and firewood processing but it's endlessly useful. I've got under 10K in all the equipment and tractor including a 3K engine rebuild. I do need to replace left side brake pack the brakes are weak on the left.

From: keepemsharp
20-Sep-22
Use a 1950 Massey Harris 22, about 25 horse good three point, live hyd. Flat head Continental and you can buy parts anywhere, changed out the brake pads awhile back and the parts people said " you have a 70 year old tractor with disc brakes?" yes.

From: Highlife
20-Sep-22
Don't drive sideways on a hillside

From: Medicinemann
20-Sep-22
When I decided that I was going to "get into" foodplotting, I identified the variables that seemed most applicable for my needs....obviously other foodplotters needs will vary from mine. I was looking for a used, 50 hp 4WD diesel with a front loader. I wanted something prior to 2012 so I didn't have any of the diesel emission technology to deal with. I'll bet that I checked TractorPete, Craigslist, Machinio, and several other websites for 2-3 years. In the meanwhile, I had access to other equipment, so I could afford to be patient.

Finally, 2 years ago, I found a Kubota M6800 4WD with a front loader with under 1,000 hours for about the price that I was willing to pay for a 50 hp tractor. I'd like to think that my patience was rewarded, as that tractor has been everything that I had hoped that it would be. In my area, we have a bulk lime company with a sizeable lime spreader.....since I buy my bulk lime from him, he lets me use the spreader for free. He told me that he would not have let me use the spreader if my tractor had been a 50 hp unit.

I had previously always had to use pellet lime (which I had to buy in bags and spread with a hand spreader or a small pull behind spreader). Pellet lime was costing me over $200/ton to put on my plots. Now, I can use bulk lime (which I prefer) and it costs me about $48.50/ton .....for the past two years. I have to chuckle, so far, my experience with tractors is similar to what I hear everyone say about barns.......you seldom wish for a smaller one.....LOL. I will also add that I always try to do all foodplot activities in 2WD......BUT it sure is nice to know that when I overestimate what my tractor can do (in 2 WD), just pulling up on that 4WD lever makes me thankful for the feature.....every single time. I do have a point for younger guys to ponder. At my age (66 next month), I have no concerns over using a diesel tractor for the remainder of my time on this rock. However, it will be interesting to observe how much pressure is exerted to make farmers/foodplotters/etc switch to an EV type of tractor in future years.....

From: Medicinemann
20-Sep-22

From: fuzzy
21-Sep-22
Dave that ruins the fun!

From: GhostBird
21-Sep-22

GhostBird's embedded Photo
GhostBird's embedded Photo
53 horse "Mean Machine"... about right for my needs

From: Highlife
21-Sep-22
Cecil I've rolled numerous times on a four wheeler I can honestly say yeah alittle fun didn't hurt myself like scaring the crap out of me with a tractor. Too many moving parts lol

From: fuzzy
21-Sep-22
Yeah it'll get your attention! Another good tip is that there's a really good reason why farm tractors have two brake pedals. Brakes primary purpose isn't slowing down or stopping, it's steering under hard pulls. No matter what tractor you get ( if shopping used) make sure it has good brakes on both sides good rear tires and a working differential lock.

From: Joey Ward
22-Sep-22

Joey Ward's embedded Photo
Joey Ward's embedded Photo
After much research, visits, test driving many makes/models/sizes, I made my decision.........Kubota L4701HST.....package deal. 6' loader, bush hog, box blade, and trailer. Quick attach out front, quick hitch out back, R4 industrial tires(ags were too agressive for what I wanted), rear tires are ballasted, and 4wd. Especially like the hydrostat trans for loader work, and everything else.

Friend has skid steer quick attach pallet forks I can borrow until I pick up my own. Perfect for the new, sideless 20' trailer, for easier loads and unloads of whatever.

This tractor will supplement my old 65hp Massey that I've used for close to 40 years. Already had a bush hog for that, along with pto seed spreader, pto hole digger, disk harrow, bottom plow, and hay spear.

From: Joey Ward
22-Sep-22

Joey Ward's embedded Photo
Joey Ward's embedded Photo
After 20 hrs in the seat, bush hogging, spreading 20 yards of gravel, and boxing drives, I'm very happy with my descion.

As always, I appreciate learning from you folks.

From: Joey Ward
22-Sep-22

Joey Ward's embedded Photo
Joey Ward's embedded Photo
Next up...........I'll install a 3rd function valve on the loader stick and pick up a grapple. :-)

From: Grey Ghost
22-Sep-22
Very nice, Joey. I think you're gonna love it.

If you don't mind, what did that entire package set you back?

Matt

From: Norseman
22-Sep-22
Very nice Joey!

From: M.Pauls
22-Sep-22
Nice Joey! I sold I similar sized tractor. Have 130hp Kubota now, which I love too, but boy, I sure miss my hydrostatic 50hp. Perfect for a lot of jobs. Have a skid steer now too, but that 50 just fit a niche perfectly that nothing replaces Congrats, you’ll love that unit!

From: Joey Ward
22-Sep-22
Thanks fellows......

For my first mod, I plan to weld a couple of chain hooks on the loader bucket even with the arms. Will be out the way and not interfere with the quick attach. I'm always using chains for lifting and pulling stuff.

From: Medicinemann
22-Sep-22
I had a chain hook welded on my bucket shortly after I got it....it has been invaluable.

From: deerhunter72
22-Sep-22
Very nice Joey! If I was going to buy new, that's exactly what I'd be looking at. I'm a little jealous.

From: fuzzy
22-Sep-22
Another tip. Don't run a diesel tractor out of fuel. Don't ask why that thought is on my mind today. Lol. And [email protected]@[email protected]

From: Joey Ward
22-Sep-22
Fuzzy, while I agree with you on older diesels like our Masseys, where you have to bleed the injectors. These newer models have a bleeder valve on top of the fuel filter. Back out a couple turns, turn the key to access position, let the fuel pump kick on and push fuel until it comes out the valve, tighten the valve, and crank. No big deal. They all have nice fuel gauges these days. :-) Of course with these newer tractors comes with the DPF and the regen process every so often. No big deal, except don’t turn off engine while in regen. Just some new stuff you have to be aware of.

One step forward, one step forward. Lol.

From: t-roy
22-Sep-22
Nice lookin rig, Joey! Totally agree on welding hooks on the attachments. I also welded one on my bucket backwards, to have a place to hook the chain to, when I have hauled a second attachment (stump bucket, forks, etc) in my bucket, to a plot, so I didn’t have to make a second trip or load and unload the second attachment from a trailer.

From: drycreek
22-Sep-22
Nice tractor, and the right color ! ;-)

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