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'22 Mtn. Goat w/ Babine Guide Outfitters
Mountain Goat
Contributors to this thread:
Ken 22-Sep-22
Ken 22-Sep-22
Ken 22-Sep-22
Ken 22-Sep-22
Ken 22-Sep-22
Ken 22-Sep-22
Potro 22-Sep-22
Jasper 22-Sep-22
Ambush 22-Sep-22
brettpsu 22-Sep-22
Ken 22-Sep-22
Ken 22-Sep-22
Ken 22-Sep-22
t-roy 22-Sep-22
Ken 23-Sep-22
Ken 23-Sep-22
Ken 23-Sep-22
Ken 23-Sep-22
Ken 23-Sep-22
Ken 23-Sep-22
Ken 23-Sep-22
Ken 23-Sep-22
t-roy 23-Sep-22
BowJangles 23-Sep-22
BOWNBIRDHNTR 23-Sep-22
Cj0n3s12 23-Sep-22
steff 23-Sep-22
deerhunter72 23-Sep-22
ahunter76 23-Sep-22
Treeline 23-Sep-22
brettpsu 23-Sep-22
Stekewood 23-Sep-22
Rackmastr 23-Sep-22
JRABQ 23-Sep-22
Matt 23-Sep-22
caribou77 23-Sep-22
Charlie Rehor 23-Sep-22
DEERAHOLIC 23-Sep-22
BULELK1 24-Sep-22
From: Ken
22-Sep-22
The quest for this hunt started at the 2020 Dallas Safari Club convention when I met Jack Hooper with Babine Guide Outfitters. I was there looking for an archery mountain goat hunt and Babine Guide Outfitters was on the short list. After 2 unsuccessful bow hunts for mountain goats (I killed a goat with a rifle on the last day on the first hunt), I had an idea of what I was looking for that would give me the best opportunity for success. My first mountain goat hunt was in Southeast Alaska. The weather was really bad and greatly limited the days we could hunt. My second mountain goat hunt was in Northeast BC. I had great weather, but the area was very steep and made it almost impossible to get close enough to the goats for a bow shot. I liked Babine’s area because it was further inland than Southeast Alaska, so the weather should be a little better. But a lot of the mountains were still more like coastal mountains than the steep Rocky Mountain range in Northeast BC. I also liked that their hunt doesn’t involve a float plane flight. So, if the weather is bad, you can bear hunt around the lodge. This sure beats sitting in a tent for days at a time in the mountains waiting for the weather and visability to improve. It also didn’t hurt that Babine had so many great reviews and write-ups on Bowsite. I originally booked the hunt for September 2021. Covid restrictions caused my youngest daughter to postpone her March 2021 wedding and it was moved to the first weekend in October2021. Lloyd and Jack Hooper were nice enough to let me reschedule to 2022, thus saving my 36-year marriage.

From: Ken
22-Sep-22
I arrived in Smithers on September 9th. Lloyd met me and another mountain goat hunter at the Smithers Airport and drove us to the lodge. Once there, I organized my gear and met my guide. My guide Gavin, was only 23 years old but was mature beyond his years, polite and a very experienced bowhunter. We went for a quick bear hunt after dinner but didn’t see any bears.

From: Ken
22-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo
The next morning, we loaded our packs into the truck and drove to a trailhead. Once there we rode in a UTV for several miles down a forest trail until a creek ended the ATV trail. The first several miles of hiking were fairly easy. The trail was an old road that was formerly used to access a mine. The brush was really thick and overgrown in places and shale slides had covered the road in a few places. But overall, it was a smooth trail with a gradual grade and way better than most mountain trails. We had to leave that trail for the last 1/2 mile or so and that section was really steep. And the boggy ground and full packs made for a tough climb.

From: Ken
22-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo
Once we made it to the alpine, we immediately started seeing mountain goats. We set up camp so we would have a view of the mountain where the goats were expected to be. This mountain was fairly flat at the top with lots of grass for the goats and ridges and trees for stalking cover.

From: Ken
22-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo
After setting up camp we went to a place to glass and inventory the goats in the area and possibly find something to stalk. That afternoon we saw around 15 mountain goats. About an hour before dark, we saw 2 billies on the top of the mountain. They were about 300 yards away when we first saw them. One was mature and the other was younger. We got to around 80 yards, then the wind swirled and scared off the goats

From: Ken
22-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo
That night we were treated to a full moon rising over the mountain range before calling it a night.

From: Potro
22-Sep-22
great story. keep coming

From: Jasper
22-Sep-22
Love this! Can’t wait for the rest!

From: Ambush
22-Sep-22
Gav is a great guy, a great guide and a superb archer. So I know you had a good time!!

Looking forward to pics and story!!

From: brettpsu
22-Sep-22
Looking forward to this. Really makes me want to go back for #3.

From: Ken
22-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo
The next morning, we were up at first light and was treated to a beautiful mountain sunrise.

From: Ken
22-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo
We immediately started seeing mountain goats from our camp. The weather was great. Clear skies and not too cold. In fact, the weather was great the entire time we were mountain goat hunting. For a mountain goat hunt it felt like cheating.

From: Ken
22-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo
That morning we saw 3 mature billies feed across the top of the mountain and eventually they all bedded down in the same generally area. Gavin recommended we find a spot near the where the billies bedded and wait for them to come back out to feed. That morning we saw 28 mountain goats.

From: t-roy
22-Sep-22
Good stuff, so far. Keep it coming!

From: Ken
23-Sep-22
We walked to the top of the mountain and found some cover on a high knob to glass and wait for the goats to come out to feed. After a few hours of seeing nothing, we went to look at some bedding areas on the other side of the mountain top. We didn’t see anything there, so we headed back to our glassing knob. When we got to our glassing knob there were 4 billies feeding about 200 yards from the glassing knob. 3 were shooters.

From: Ken
23-Sep-22
The goats were moving to the right while feeding so we ducked below a ridge to get out of the goat’s sight and moved parallel to the goats. When the goats started feeding in our direction it looked like they were going to cross at a low spot in the ridge we were hiding behind. We set up for the goats to cross the low spot. The goats eventually fed into the low spot. The closest goat was one of the shooters. When the billy passed at 56 yard and offered a quartering away shot, I took it. The shot looked good, but the goat ran out of sight. Gavin had taken a video of the shot with his phone, so we had confirmation that the shot looked good.

From: Ken
23-Sep-22
Video of shot. This is my first time to post a Youttube video so hopefully it works.

From: Ken
23-Sep-22

Ken's Link

From: Ken
23-Sep-22
We decided to give it 45 minutes before looking for the goat. We killed some time around the shot location, then decided to go back to the glassing knob and give the goat some time to expire. When we got back to the glassing knob Gavin said, “look, a dead goat”. The goat had died mid-stride less than 75 yards from our glassing area. The goat had gone about 150 yards after the shot. With the relatively flat mountain top, it died far from the cliffs that can turn an archery mountain goat hunt turn into a nightmare. The billy was 6 years old and had 8” horns.

From: Ken
23-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo

From: Ken
23-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo

From: Ken
23-Sep-22

Ken's embedded Photo
Ken's embedded Photo
I used a Vortex 100 grain steel broadhead and it did it's job.

From: t-roy
23-Sep-22
Congrats, Ken! Sounds like things worked out perfectly for you. Like you alluded to, seems like lots of times, goats seem to end up tumbling off a cliff, or making it to some hell hole before dying.

From: BowJangles
23-Sep-22
I'm doing a Centerfold shoot for Playgirl next month. For Turn On's I'm providing one answer: Mountain Goat write-ups on Bowsite.

Hell of a hunt and a beaut of a goat. Congrats man! Thanks for taking us along!!

From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
23-Sep-22
Congrats! Very cool getting the shot on video. My son and I will both have our quivers full of Vortex broadheads while in Alaska in two weeks! We are hunting Sitka Blacktail but hopefully we will at least see some goats from the plane.

From: Cj0n3s12
23-Sep-22
Nice write-up. Appreciated the read

From: steff
23-Sep-22
Great goat, congrats!!! Thanks for sharing.

From: deerhunter72
23-Sep-22
Beautiful billy goat!! Your thread makes goat hunting look easy, but I understand it isn't;)

From: ahunter76
23-Sep-22
Congratulations.. Looked like a great shot for sure... Thanks for sharing..

From: Treeline
23-Sep-22
Congratulations! Hell of a great hunt!

23-Sep-22
Congrats ! On your goat

From: brettpsu
23-Sep-22
Congrats Ken! My hunts with Babine are still some of my favorites.

From: Stekewood
23-Sep-22
Awesome! Great photos and write up. Congratulations on a beautiful billy.

From: Rackmastr
23-Sep-22
Very cool stuff!! Congrats!

From: JRABQ
23-Sep-22
Congrats on your goat, and thanks for sharing your story!

From: Matt
23-Sep-22
Congratulations, love to see Vortex in action!

From: caribou77
23-Sep-22
What a beautiful area! Congratulations

23-Sep-22
Very cool. Enjoy your success and thx for posting

From: DEERAHOLIC
23-Sep-22
Congratulation!! Thanks for a great post. Babine Outfitters are a excellent outfit and loved hunting with them last year. It was a hunt of a lifetime.

From: BULELK1
24-Sep-22
What a Dandy---->

Congrats,

Robb

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