I asked AI (ChatGPT) about Hunting
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
eBike John 22-Jan-23
bluedog 22-Jan-23
Ambush 22-Jan-23
Candor 22-Jan-23
Pat Lefemine 22-Jan-23
bluedog 22-Jan-23
PushCoArcher 22-Jan-23
EmbryOklahoma 22-Jan-23
bluedog 22-Jan-23
Pat Lefemine 22-Jan-23
Ambush 22-Jan-23
EmbryOklahoma 22-Jan-23
sitO 22-Jan-23
eBike John 23-Jan-23
DanaC 23-Jan-23
Ambush 23-Jan-23
DanaC 23-Jan-23
eBike John 23-Jan-23
bluedog 23-Jan-23
bluedog 23-Jan-23
Ambush 23-Jan-23
From: eBike John
22-Jan-23
Just for fun, I'm experimenting with the new AI tool chat ChatGPT and I decided to ask it about hunting. I'm sharing that dialogue below just for anyone curious about how good the new AI tool is.

For context, I just asked a few random questions and/or gave it some prompts and the content it spit out was instant.

Anyway, just for fun here's that conversation....

John: What can AI do for the hunting industry?

AI can be used in a variety of ways to assist the hunting industry. Some examples include:

Wildlife tracking and monitoring: AI-powered cameras and drones can be used to track and monitor wildlife populations, which can help hunters make more informed decisions about where to hunt.

Predictive modeling: AI algorithms can be used to analyze data on weather, animal behavior, and other factors to predict where and when certain species are likely to be found.

Automated game calls: AI-powered devices can be programmed to mimic the calls of different animals, which can attract them to a specific location and make them easier to hunt.

Game recognition: AI-powered cameras and other devices can be used to automatically identify different species of game, which can help hunters quickly and accurately identify their target.

Automatic animal tracking: AI-powered cameras can be used to automatically track and identify animals, this can help hunters to find and track the animal they want to hunt.

Overall, AI can provide valuable insights and assistance to hunters, helping them to be more efficient and effective in their pursuits.

John: Does this technology already exist? Some of the AI-powered technologies for hunting that I mentioned do already exist and are available on the market. For example, there are AI-powered cameras and drones that can be used for wildlife tracking and monitoring, and some companies have developed AI-powered devices that can mimic the calls of different animals to attract game. Additionally, there are AI-powered cameras that can automatically identify different species of game, and automatic animal tracking cameras.

However, it's worth noting that the development and implementation of these technologies are still relatively new and not all of them are widely available or adopted yet. Additionally, the use of AI technology in hunting is a controversial topic, and there may be limitations on its use in certain areas due to regulations or ethical concerns.

John: How big is the hunting industry? The hunting industry is a significant contributor to the economy in many countries, although the size of the industry can vary depending on the country and region. In the United States, hunting and fishing activities contribute billions of dollars to the economy each year. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in 2016 hunting, fishing and wildlife-related recreation contributed $156 billion to the U.S economy and supported 1.6 million jobs.

In Europe, hunting is also an important economic activity, with many countries having a long history of hunting and a significant number of people engaged in hunting as a hobby or profession. In Germany, for example, hunting generates around €8 billion in revenue annually, and supports around 200,000 jobs.

In Africa, hunting also has a significant impact on the economy, mainly in rural areas where hunting safaris generate income for local communities, and in the case of big game hunting, the revenue can be substantial.

Overall, hunting is an important source of revenue and employment in many countries, and the industry continues to grow as a result of new technologies and innovations that make hunting more efficient and effective.

John: Are electric bikes popular among hunters? Electric bikes, also known as e-bikes, are becoming increasingly popular among hunters as they offer a number of benefits over traditional bicycles or other modes of transportation.

One of the main advantages of e-bikes is that they allow hunters to cover more ground quickly and easily, which can be particularly useful when hunting in rough terrain or in areas with limited access. E-bikes also provide a silent mode of transportation, which can be an advantage when trying to get close to game without being detected.

Another advantage of e-bikes is that they are less physically demanding than traditional bicycles, which can make them a good option for hunters who may not be in the best physical shape or for those who have mobility issues.

Additionally, e-bikes have become more affordable and available, this has made them more accessible for a wider range of hunters.

Overall, electric bikes are becoming an increasingly popular option among hunters due to their convenience and versatility, and it's likely that their popularity will continue to grow in the future.

John: Please make a list of the most common known products that hunters use. Here is a list of some common products that hunters use:

Hunting firearms: These include rifles, shotguns, handguns, and muzzleloaders, used for hunting a variety of game species.

Ammunition: This includes various types of bullets and shells, used in firearms.

Hunting knives: Used for skinning and cleaning game, as well as for general camping and survival tasks.

Optics: This includes binoculars, spotting scopes, and rangefinders, used for spotting and identifying game.

Camouflage clothing: Used to blend in with the surrounding environment and conceal the hunter from game.

Game calls: Used to mimic the calls of different animals to attract game to a specific location.

Backpacks and hunting packs: Used to carry hunting gear, food, and other supplies.

Game cameras: These are cameras that can be left in the field for a period of time to monitor wildlife movements, and other activities in a specific location.

Tree stands and blinds: Used to conceal the hunter and provide a good vantage point for hunting.

GPS and navigation equipment: Used to navigate and track one's location in the field.

Electric bikes (e-bikes) are becoming increasingly popular among hunters as they offer an efficient, silent mode of transportation and less physically demanding than traditional bicycles.

Game bags and coolers: Used to transport and store game meat after it has been harvested.

This is not an exhaustive list, but it covers some of the most common products that hunters use.

John: Is hunting a net positive for the USA? Hunting can have both positive and negative impacts on the environment and the economy in the United States.

On the positive side, hunting can help to control wildlife populations and prevent overpopulation, which can lead to habitat destruction and other negative impacts. Hunting can also help to control the spread of diseases among wildlife populations.

In addition, hunting is an important economic activity in many parts of the United States, generating billions of dollars in revenue each year and supporting thousands of jobs. Hunting is also an important source of food for many people, and it is a traditional and cultural activity for many communities.

However, hunting can also have negative impacts. For example, it can lead to the decline of certain species if they are hunted excessively. Additionally, hunting can be harmful to the environment if it is not regulated properly, as it can lead to habitat destruction, soil erosion, and other negative impacts.

Overall, hunting can have both positive and negative impacts on the environment and the economy in the United States, and it is important that hunting is managed and regulated in a sustainable way to minimize negative impacts and maximize positive benefits.

John: Is hunting still popular in the USA? Hunting is still popular in the United States, although the number of hunters has been declining in recent years. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the number of hunters in the United States has declined by about 2% per year on average over the past decade.

However, hunting remains an important cultural and economic activity in many parts of the country, and it is still popular among many people. According to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, in 2021, around 14.2 million people hunted in the U.S. This number reflects a decline from the previous years, but it's still a significant number of people.

The reasons for the decline in hunting numbers are various, and it could be due to different factors such as urbanization, changes in societal values, and lack of access to hunting lands. Additionally, the cost of hunting equipment, licenses, and leases can make hunting a costly activity, and that could be a barrier for some people.

Despite the decline in the number of hunters, hunting remains an important activity and a vital component of wildlife management and conservation. Hunting organizations, state and federal agencies, and other groups are working to promote hunting and to make it more accessible to new participants, by creating programs and initiatives that encourage people to try hunting and to keep hunting traditions alive.

John: How many people in the USA are hunters? According to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, in 2021, around 14.2 million people hunted in the United States. The survey is conducted every five years by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and provides detailed information on the number of people who hunt, fish, and engage in other wildlife-related activities.

It's worth noting that the number of hunters has been declining in recent years, and it's about half of what it was in the 1970s, but it's still a significant number of people.

It's also worth noting that the number of hunters varies from state to state and can be influenced by factors such as population density, availability of public hunting land, and hunting regulations.

John: List out the popularity of hunting by US state. going from most popular to least popular.

I apologize, but I am not aware of any recent data that provides a ranking of hunting popularity by state in the USA. The popularity of hunting can vary greatly by state, and can be influenced by factors such as population density, availability of public hunting land, hunting regulations, and cultural factors. Additionally, the data is subject to change over time and can vary between years.

It's worth noting that the number of hunters and hunting license sold does not necessarily reflect popularity. Factors such as population density, hunting regulations, and cultural factors play a role in determining the number of hunters and hunting license sold in each state.

Instead, I suggest checking with the state wildlife agencies, as they are the ones who manage hunting regulations and have access to the most recent and accurate data on hunting license sales and participation in each state. They can provide more detailed information on hunting popularity, hunting license sales, and other related data by state.

From: bluedog
22-Jan-23
I've been playing around with it myself for a few days. I'm amazed with it's ability already and assume this is the tip of the ice berg. This is just the model T version. It's fascinating for me anyway.

From: Ambush
22-Jan-23
Canada has been run by artificial intelligence for the past seven years. EI: pretending to be smart but definitely not!

But that seemed like a pretty well balanced and accurate accounting you got from it.

From: Candor
22-Jan-23
The US is run by neither artificial nor natural intelligence.

John - that was very interesting to read. I agree with Ambush - it seemed to have little bias in how the answers were phrased.

From: Pat Lefemine
22-Jan-23
I've been evaluating ChatGPT as well, but have not tried asking it about hunting. This was very interesting John!

I'd say the answers were pretty accurate. I think the answer about using AI for hunting was mostly 'vaporware' and not in any way grounded in reality.

From: bluedog
22-Jan-23
I've had it write poems or short stories on different topics. Entertaining and a better time waster than a Zippo lighter. ;)

From: PushCoArcher
22-Jan-23
Damn it people didn't any of you watch Terminator this is how skynet begins;).

22-Jan-23
Can you ask who the smartest person on Bowsite is? :)

From: bluedog
22-Jan-23
Sure..... "I'm not aware of anyone specifically known as the "smartest person on Bowsite." Intelligence can manifest in many different ways, and it is difficult to make a definitive statement about who the smartest person is in any given community or group. Additionally, Bowsite is a hunting forum, not a platform for intelligence ranking."

From: Pat Lefemine
22-Jan-23
On that last statement they should have omitted the word ‘ranking’ and it would be more accurate.

From: Ambush
22-Jan-23
So AI is not so intelligent after all. I'm pretty sure most everyone can point out who thinks they're the smartest person on Bowsite.

Ask about baiting!

22-Jan-23
“Additionally, Bowsite is a hunting forum, not a platform for intelligence ranking.” 100% Truth. But the vast majority of threads have the same few individuals who do a valiant effort to put forward that notion. :)

John… sorry, didn’t mean to derail (yes I did). Back on semi-topic. I’ve been looking at e-bikes for public land. I’ve got some spots that would be perfect for this application. Can you recommend a lower to mid type price range bike? Thanks.

From: sitO
22-Jan-23
Here I am Rod, what do you need?

From: eBike John
23-Jan-23
Hey Rick, I can certainly help point you in the right direction. I just sent you a private message with a few easy questions to help narrow it down.

From: DanaC
23-Jan-23
I don't know how it will affect hunting but it seems like it could take over *writing about* hunting. The above sounded like the condensed version of 1000 results from a google search.

From: Ambush
23-Jan-23
Ask It to write an exciting story about a Stone sheep hunt. See how It stakes up to Jack O'conner.

From: DanaC
23-Jan-23
I imagine not so well, but toss in a few anecdotes and you could sell it to a magazine easy enough. (Or magazines will get lazy and do it themselves.)

From: eBike John
23-Jan-23
DanaC, I suspect magazines are already doing it. Last year there was an earlier version of this AI and I published an article on Entrepreneur.com and it's still published :-)

From: bluedog
23-Jan-23
Chatgpt stone sheep hunt..... (kinda lame IMO)

"Once upon a time, in a remote mountain range, a hunter set out on a journey to find the elusive stone sheep. He had heard tales of these creatures, with their shimmering grey coats and stony horns, and was determined to make them his trophy.

The hunter traveled through treacherous terrain, enduring freezing temperatures and high winds, but he was determined to find his quarry. He set up camp at the base of the mountain and began his ascent, scanning the rocky outcroppings for any sign of the sheep.

As he climbed higher, he spotted movement on a nearby ledge. He carefully made his way towards it, and there, standing proud and majestic, was a stone sheep. The hunter raised his rifle and fired, but to his surprise, the bullet bounced off the sheep's stony hide.

The sheep looked at him with a mixture of confusion and amusement before bounding away. The hunter realized that he could never kill such a magnificent creature and decided to let it live. He returned home empty-handed, but with the memory of the stone sheep etched in his mind forever.

He learned that sometimes the true trophy is the experience and the memory of the hunt, not the kill. He felt proud of himself for respecting the magnificent creature, and he knew that he would always remember the moment he laid eyes on the Stone sheep."

From: bluedog
23-Jan-23
Another chatgpt story. Hunter kills stone sheep with bow.....

"The hunter crept through the rocky terrain, his eyes scanning the hills for any sign of the elusive stone sheep. He had been tracking this particular animal for days, and was determined to make a successful kill.

As he crested a small rise, he spotted the sheep grazing in a clearing below. He carefully unslung his bow and nocked an arrow, taking careful aim at the animal.

With a steady hand, he released the arrow, watching as it flew through the air and struck the sheep in the chest. The animal let out a bleat and stumbled, then fell to the ground.

The hunter approached the sheep, a sense of satisfaction washing over him. It had been a difficult hunt, but the rewards would be worth it. He would be able to provide food for his family, and the sheep's hide would make a warm and durable blanket.

As he knelt beside the animal, he murmured a silent thanks to the spirits of the hunt, and to the sheep for providing for him and his loved ones. Then he got to work skinning and preparing the animal for transport back to his village."

From: Ambush
23-Jan-23
Ok. Goes without saying that the first hunter was using a Rage and it just bounced off the ram. He then made up some BS about the hunt being more important than the kill to make himself feel better

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