Feral horses
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
Stoneman 27-May-24
bad karma 27-May-24
Bent arrow 27-May-24
Glunt@work 27-May-24
IdyllwildArcher 27-May-24
Shrewski 27-May-24
Beendare 27-May-24
HDE 27-May-24
Trying hard 27-May-24
RonP 27-May-24
midwest 27-May-24
Zbone 27-May-24
nvgoat 27-May-24
nvgoat 27-May-24
Lucas 27-May-24
nvgoat 27-May-24
Stoneman 27-May-24
Stoneman 27-May-24
Stoneman 27-May-24
Corax_latrans 27-May-24
Zbone 27-May-24
Lucas 27-May-24
Treeline 27-May-24
Highlife 27-May-24
butcherboy 27-May-24
Jim Moore 27-May-24
Tilzbow 28-May-24
Stoneman 28-May-24
DL 28-May-24
DanaC 28-May-24
No Mercy 28-May-24
smarba 28-May-24
Corax_latrans 28-May-24
DL 28-May-24
Tilzbow 28-May-24
wildwilderness 28-May-24
timberdoodle 28-May-24
Corax_latrans 28-May-24
scentman 28-May-24
BoggsBowhunts 28-May-24
Ironbow 28-May-24
Corax_latrans 28-May-24
Glunt@work 28-May-24
fuzzy 28-May-24
Corax_latrans 28-May-24
Brijake 28-May-24
Tilzbow 28-May-24
Tilzbow 28-May-24
Tilzbow 28-May-24
HDE 29-May-24
Corax_latrans 29-May-24
smarba 29-May-24
MichaelArnette 29-May-24
Corax_latrans 29-May-24
Tilzbow 29-May-24
Mike B 29-May-24
buckeye 29-May-24
Corax_latrans 29-May-24
WYelkhunter 02-Jun-24
greg simon 02-Jun-24
KSflatlander 02-Jun-24
Glunt@work 02-Jun-24
KB 02-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 02-Jun-24
Matt 02-Jun-24
wyobullshooter 02-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 02-Jun-24
wyobullshooter 02-Jun-24
Matt 02-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 02-Jun-24
Tilzbow 02-Jun-24
Catscratch 02-Jun-24
Lucas 06-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 07-Jun-24
Rut-Nut 07-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 07-Jun-24
walking buffalo 08-Jun-24
csalem 08-Jun-24
KSflatlander 08-Jun-24
Catscratch 08-Jun-24
wyobullshooter 08-Jun-24
KSflatlander 08-Jun-24
Tilzbow 08-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 08-Jun-24
KSflatlander 08-Jun-24
Tilzbow 08-Jun-24
Stoneman 08-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 11-Jun-24
Tilzbow 11-Jun-24
Highlife 12-Jun-24
Thornton 12-Jun-24
csalem 12-Jun-24
Glunt@work 12-Jun-24
TreeWalker 13-Jun-24
TreeWalker 13-Jun-24
Thornton 13-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 13-Jun-24
Jim Moore 13-Jun-24
csalem 13-Jun-24
Zbone 13-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 13-Jun-24
Thornton 13-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 13-Jun-24
Tilzbow 14-Jun-24
DL 14-Jun-24
Stoneman 14-Jun-24
DL 14-Jun-24
Corax_latrans 14-Jun-24
From: Stoneman
27-May-24
Curious if anyone has an opinion on this topic including the following questions but not specifically limited those.

Are feral horses considered a problem in your state do they have a negative or detrimental impact to our federal lands within your state?

In your opinion or based on your states wildlife agency evaluations have the feral horses in your state had a negative impact on the indigenous plants and animals?

If so, should they be managed at the state level or at the federal level? What would the management plan look like?

If other countries wanted to buy or receive these animals for use (food) should that be part of the management practice to help control and or eradicate if deemed necessary?

General thoughts…

From: bad karma
27-May-24
Yes, in the NW part of the state. BLM has over 20,000 feral horses in captivity, too. They can't figure out what to do with them so taxpayer dollars are used to house and feed them.

From: Bent arrow
27-May-24
Send um to Japan. Love horse meat.

From: Glunt@work
27-May-24
Like so much of public resource management these days, the logical, common sense solutions lose out to politics and emotion.

There's room for a few and they are part of the American west story. Unfortunately, managing them to keep populations in check won't ever be noncontroversal and likely will only get worse.

I worked on a ranch near Baggs a long time ago and when still legal they would do round ups and use them as ranch horses. There were still a few in use when I was there.

27-May-24
What Glunt said.

And the burros too.

From: Shrewski
27-May-24
They are a scourge. They are hell on desert sheep in AZ; only the most aggressive rams can get to water. They are an invasive species and need to be eliminated!

From: Beendare
27-May-24
The high desert habitat near water holes in Ne CA and southern Or are trampled to powder- They are completely wiping out the fragile flora and fauna in these areas.

This just goes to show, the F&G isn't interested in protecting the environment or the balance of nature. Nope, they are there to cater to the special interests wants; Wild horses, Mountain lions, wolves.

From: HDE
27-May-24
Feral horses are a weed and should be treated as such.

From: Trying hard
27-May-24
Horses eat all day long....I don't live in a state that has wild/feral horses...they have got to be consuming food that native wild animals need.... Seems like the people that are supposed to be taking care of this are not

From: RonP
27-May-24
the other thing blm and fish and wildlife do not openly admit is the impact feral horses have on sage grouse, which have and continue to decline in oregon and nevada. the populations of sage grouse are a fraction of what they once were. the overpopulation of horses destroys their cover and ruins nests.

From: midwest
27-May-24
Killem' all

From: Zbone
27-May-24
Are there any states that allow ya to kill them?

From: nvgoat
27-May-24
Way too many in Nevada. Ruin habitat and destroy water holes. Can’t stand them

From: nvgoat
27-May-24
Way too many in Nevada. Ruin habitat and destroy water holes. Can’t stand them

From: Lucas
27-May-24
No, Fed law projects them. There are captive herds in several states just eating and crapping all on the taxpayers dime. That doesn't count the feral herds in almost every western state. The Navajo tried to hunt some years ago and even on their tribal ground there were protests.

From: nvgoat
27-May-24
Way too many in Nevada. Ruin habitat and destroy water holes. Can’t stand them

From: Stoneman
27-May-24

Stoneman's embedded Photo
Stoneman's embedded Photo
A couple of years ago I found this natural spring where both pronghorn and mule deer frequented. I started making plans on where to hang my stand.

From: Stoneman
27-May-24

Stoneman's embedded Photo
Stoneman's embedded Photo
Shortly after that about 30 feral horses crossed onto the national forest from BLM and private property designated for their grazing. This is what the same spring looked like after a few months…

From: Stoneman
27-May-24

Stoneman's embedded Photo
Stoneman's embedded Photo
Getting fed up with seeing horse shit all over OUR nation forest!

Unfortunately Glunt is correct, this is a very emotional and political issue.

27-May-24
I don’t hate them, but they’re a very serious problem pretty much everywhere they’re found.

JMO, they don’t need to be completely eradicated (too expensive anyway), but they need rounding up regularly. I have no problem with selling them off to the highest bidders, just to offset the cost of the roundup. I would also be 100% on board with treating them like big game. And if it’s not cost-prohibitive, I could get behind returning stallions to the wild if the individual horses are unlikely to ever be broken AND based on their percentage of “first generation” DNA. I figure if they’re going to be justified as an historical artifact, they should be as “pure-bred” as possible…

Also on board for state-level management; sort of like African elephants, the people who don’t have to live with them should not be allowed to dictate the terms to those who do.

And yeah, the Feds should have some way of intervening if state-level horse management is not providing adequate protection of federally endangered species like desert bighorns.

From: Zbone
27-May-24
So I take it we are not going to see a hero picture on here of somebody arrowing one?...8^)

Although I have seen feral cattle and feral camel hero pictures here...8^)

From: Lucas
27-May-24
The australia bowhunting association has pictures.

From: Treeline
27-May-24
They are horrible in Colorado, Wyoming, and Arizona where I have hunted. They massively destructive to the habitat - water and vegetation - and drive native big game out of their territories.

They should be eradicated from all public lands in the west.

The politics will never allow for eradication, nor even reasonable management to specific population objectives. This problem will never go away.

From: Highlife
27-May-24
Wack and stack than use as bait......

From: butcherboy
27-May-24
I’ve hunted a few areas in NM where they have destroyed everything for miles. Especially in the Carson forest. There is no way it would be allowed to trap them and ship them over seas for slaughter and food. They still have a few round ups here once in a while with the option to adopt one. If they can be broke they make one hell of a mountain horse. They should definitely be thinned way down and managed by the state not the fed govt. A few years back there was a guy in southern NM that tried to open a slaughter plant for horses and it was shut down so fast by the locals and animal activists.

From: Jim Moore
27-May-24
Here in Nevada, they are a problem. They are starting to become a problem with guzzlers. We have thousands of those inbred, jugheaded things in the state. Stomp out water holes, diminish feed that the wildflife uses. The BLM does round ups from time to time, but not nearly enough. Horse lovers are insane about these activities. T Boone Pickens wife bought up an old ranch south of Wells and now it's like a destination thing. Save the Mustangs and all that crap. They aren't mustangs, they're feral horses.

From: Tilzbow
28-May-24
If you add up the total weight of all the game animals in Nevada it doesn’t outweigh the total weight of the feral horses in the state. Think about that and let me know if there’s a problem.

From: Stoneman
28-May-24
That’s the same bs I hear from the locals here in Wyoming … but but they’re “wild” horses. BS

They are feral horses, they are so far removed from the wild mustangs of Spain it’s pathetic. I have spoke to the livestock commission, the local sheriffs department, the game and fish, and the forest service.

Finally I was able to get someone from the forest service to come out and see for themselves. Unfortunately they are a government agency and they even admitted that even if they had the money to address the problem it would take years…

I don’t have any issues with them staying within their designated boundaries but when they jump fences onto forest service lands and destroy the habitat and encroach on the indigenous wildlife that’s enough. If they were threatening the wolves or grizzlies then the shit would hit the fan.

From: DL
28-May-24
Stoneman, the horsey people have deeper pockets than furry people lobby. They are terrible in the foothills up north. They thought local trails in areas were only for them.

From: DanaC
28-May-24
"Fed law projects them. "

Have you brought this to the attention of your Senators and Representatives? Talked with large landowners, who may have their ear?

From: No Mercy
28-May-24
They're getting overpopulated here in ND. They roam freely in the Theodore Roosevelt National Park. They sent a survey out about whether to start controlling the population, band decided that they were going to stay. I am guessing once they start leaving the park things will probably start changing.

From: smarba
28-May-24
NM there are some areas I've been to where horses have damaged landscape and springs. AZ some areas I've been to have LOTS of burros.

All are feral and to me the easiest thing would be to make them a huntable animal just like a feral hog. They'd never be fully eradicated, but their numbers would be kept much lower.

I've heard that there are actually lands where they are not legally protected in NM, but I haven't looked into it enough to verify this.

Heck, here in NM we have feral cattle (true feral, not just escaped ear tagged ranch animals) and the huggers blew a gasket when the Feds tried to get them shot from helicopter in remote Wilderness. And another area I know, the County pays a guy to capture them individually and cart them to auction...

28-May-24
Anybody have a good sense of how well the management is working down on Chincoteague/Assateague?

The Misty series of books made heroes out of those ponies for generations… Seems like they’re doing a much better job with the ponies there than the feral cats…. Damn cats are like milfoil….

From: DL
28-May-24
A ranch I hunt at in eastern Oregon had a local historian come talk one year. He had pictures of the area from the early 1900s. The local ranchers turned their horses loose in the winter, then in spring would take what they wanted and they rest were left out to fend for themselves. Most likely a practice all over the west. Everytime times are financially tough horses are taken and released by some owners. It’s a scourge all over the west.

From: Tilzbow
28-May-24
I’m sure most remember the annual picture of Randy Ulmer behind a monster Nevada muley buck. The unit he shot those deer in has been devastated by feral horses and drought and may never get back to its former glory. Resident archery tags were reduced from 70-80 to 8 a few years ago.

The Virginia Range just east of Reno, NV and the area just outside of town on the east side of Reno have over 3,000 feral horses in a fairly small area. Ten times the carrying capacity! It’s so bad even the chukar population had been reduced to near zero since the peak I witnessed in the mountains next to my house in 2010. I saw over 300 birds one day and now I haven’t heard one in over 7 years.

28-May-24
They are a scourge for Native Flora and Fauna.

The wild horse a burro act of Congress is an abomination of sound management.

They should all be eliminated on public land.

From: timberdoodle
28-May-24

timberdoodle's Link
I think everyone who has been around them in any number has witnessed significant impacts to native wildlife (wallowing out springs, being aggressive to other wildlife around water, overgrazing, etc). I don't place a lot of blame on the state or federal agencies - their hands have been largely tied due to a political decision made in 1971. If anything is to ever get changed, a lot of people would need to have pretty convincing talks with a lot of congressmen & senators showing pictures like the ones shown. Maybe HOWL should take up the mantle, but IME, horse advocates are often passionate, well-healed, and more importantly, well-connected.

28-May-24
“Long title: An Act to require the protection, management, and control of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands.”

Well, I guess they’ve succeeded with Step One….

Probably some well-compensated lawyer out there prepared to argue that Ferals are exempt from the parts about Management and Control because they’re free-ranging, but not actually “wild”….

From: scentman
28-May-24
So it's fair to say "your beating a live horse" ;0] scentman

28-May-24
I’m surprised more of the hunting groups don’t talk about horses more than wolves. After all, when Lewis and Clark headed west and game was most abundant - there were undoubtedly peak wolf and lion numbers as well, yet game numbers were still at an all time high. This is one of the reasons that it’s almost laughable when people think wolves are a bigger deal than urban expansion/human footprint on the landscape. Not true about feral horses, as they were only fairly recently introduced to the landscape. I’m assuming it’s because wolves are predators and it’s easier to sell “wolves eating fawns” being a problem than it is “horses eating food” being a problem.

From: Ironbow
28-May-24
I think we should hunt them and eat them. Why not? Very popular in France as well.

28-May-24
“After all, when Lewis and Clark headed west and game was most abundant - there were undoubtedly peak wolf and lion numbers as well, yet game numbers were still at an all time high. ”

Well, not really. We have a lot more deer now than we did in 1800. And as far as “peak” predator numbers, I’d expect that wolves and bears must’ve been EVERYWHERE during the great bison slaughter, when whole carcasses littered the landscape probably as far as the eye could see. Wolves and bears probably went to full-time scavenging for the duration, and I’ve seen written accounts of packs of coyotes numbering into scores…. It’s no wonder they turned to huntIng livestock — what little game was left, the predators had all forgotten how to hunt, or so it seems likely….

But just a thought — I’ll bet that feral-born burros are fantastic protection for a flock of sheep/goats….

From: Glunt@work
28-May-24
Lewis and Clark's expedition almost starved. Not everywhere was full of game. After making it through the Bitterroots, they were near starvation and the Nez Perce saved tge day with bread and salmon.

From: fuzzy
28-May-24
I'd hunt and eat them

28-May-24
In re: Lewis & Clark — read Undaunted Courage, if you’re interested in that expedition.

From: Brijake
28-May-24
Ive heard horse is delicious

From: Tilzbow
28-May-24
I’ve eaten zebra and it was delicious. I don’t think I’d eat any of the 80-100 feral horses that roam the hills by my horse. They’re nasty, inbred looking things.

From: Tilzbow
28-May-24

Tilzbow's Link
Here’s some good information. Note the population estimates and the recent declines.

From: Tilzbow
28-May-24

Tilzbow's embedded Photo
Tilzbow's embedded Photo
Population by state as of March 2024. Important to note the AML, which is the number of horses the range can support. This target is set by the local BLM offices and per the 1971 act they should be allowed to remove horses and burros to meet the AML, but of course, special interest groups get in the way. There’s also the issue of funding. Call and write your congressional representatives!

From: HDE
29-May-24
They took the signs down in the Jicarilla ranger district of the Carson NF a few years back about them being protected because NF is not public land the way BLM is. Maybe that was the reason.

29-May-24
Dayum. Nevada number is insane!

So if the signs have come down…. Are they actually not protected?

From: smarba
29-May-24
I note NM shows 0 feral burros present; however, I've spotted at least 3 in NM while scouting for elk in the 16 units...

29-May-24
They are devastating, anyone who’s ever spent much time in Nevada can see it

29-May-24
Problematic because horses can survive on forage too poor to support a ruminant… they’re kind of an Ultimate Survivor that way….

From: Tilzbow
29-May-24
^^^^ So true! The ones around my house eat green tumble weeds when it’s a dry year. There was an area in Idaho, years ago, where the horses survived a hard winter by eating juniper bark, while the deer and elk died from starvation.

From: Mike B
29-May-24
Some 50+ years ago my family used to frequently camp in a cove on the Arizona side of Lake Mead. There were groups of wild burros in the area, and sometimes at night they would walk right through the middle of our camp to drink from the river. They pretty much had a "you leave us alone and we'll leave you alone" kind of attitude, except for that jack..he was an ornery bastard, and didn't tolerate anyone near his wimmens.

From: buckeye
29-May-24
I'd eat one if given the chance.

29-May-24
I’ll split one with you, because God knows my wife wouldn’t eat it. And I have a niece who’d never forgive me for it!

But it makes as much sense as eating whitetails in VA…

From: WYelkhunter
02-Jun-24
yes to all questions. I don't understand why they are allowed to be on the landscape. Name another invasive species that is protected and not eradicated.

From: greg simon
02-Jun-24
^^^Liberals^^^

From: KSflatlander
02-Jun-24
"Name another invasive species that is protected and not eradicated."

Ring-neck pheasant

From: Glunt@work
02-Jun-24
1/2 right. Pheasants, like brown trout, aren't native and aren't eradicated but are managed by states for the benefit of citizens and use by citizens.

From: KB
02-Jun-24

KB's embedded Photo
KB's embedded Photo
Not really even half right. Pheasants aren’t invasive, nor are they protected. A couple million are killed every year.

Feral house cats might fall under WYelk’s criteria depending where you live.

02-Jun-24
Get a clue, KB…. You say Pheasants aren’t protected…. So, what?? You’re saying that you don’t need a hunting license, there are no seasons, no daily/seasonal bag or possession limits, no extra license stamps required, no prohibitions against shooting hens, no prohibitions against shooting them with rifles, no restrictions as to what gauge shotgun you can use or how many shells it can hold??

Sure as hell sounds like Protection to me…..

I don’t know if it has been repealed, but CT actually passed protections and very tight limits for Trophy Class carp. Bowfishing guys here were SERIOUSLY hacked off about that one…. And of course that’s State level, rather than Fed.

From: Matt
02-Jun-24
If a species can be legally hunted by sport hunters, it is not protected.

02-Jun-24
^^^^ Exactly. Big difference between being protected and being managed.

02-Jun-24
Call it Semantics. JMO, Managed is a subset of Protected.

02-Jun-24
In your mind, I’m sure it is.

From: Matt
02-Jun-24
“Call it Semantics. JMO, Managed is a subset of Protected.”

It is not semantics, it is a blatant mischaracterization. Protected as it applies to wildlife indicates that there is a law the prohibits the killing, injuring, or capturing of that species. For feral horses and burros, the legislation that codifies that protection is the “ Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act”.

02-Jun-24
“Protected as it applies to wildlife indicates that there is a law the prohibits the killing, injuring, or capturing of that species. ”

You mean like a cock Pheasant outside of the season… or a hen at any time of the year??

LOL

Because the WHBA does in fact permit/require the capture & removal of WHB… It’s even (arguably) intended to “manage” them (however poor the execution), just not as “game” species…..

How ‘bout we agree that they are overprotected and inadequately managed for reasons which are totally unscientific, and the unintended consequences have become a disaster?

From: Tilzbow
02-Jun-24
For F sake, Bowsite can’t even agree on an obvious issue once the resident libtard enters the room…. Some would rather argue semantics than do something productive.

From: Catscratch
02-Jun-24
Lol, this thread got really weird really quickly!

From: Lucas
06-Jun-24
Mute swans are also a protected invasive. Feral donkey too. Can't think of any others off the top of my head.

07-Jun-24
Monk parakeets?

From: Rut-Nut
07-Jun-24

Rut-Nut's Link
I just heard about an auction happening in Central Pa soon. Apparently it’s been going on for years……………..

07-Jun-24
Yup, but it’s not enough.

Though I’d think one of those burros would know what to do about coyotes….

08-Jun-24
"Name another invasive species that is protected and not eradicated." Ring-neck pheasant

How you know you're arguing with an idiot....

From: csalem
08-Jun-24
What is even worse, that idiot has some kind of wildlife science degree. Maybe Jr College, but still.

From: KSflatlander
08-Jun-24
Pheasants are absolutely non-native and invasive. Just because they are managed as a game bird does not make them native. If you don't think they are protected then shoot one in July and take it to your local conservation officer.

From: Catscratch
08-Jun-24
To be an invasive 2 criteria must be met; non-native... and harmful to the local economy or bioms. Do pheasants meet both criteria?

Protected species are illegal to be harmed or killed. Do pheasants fall into this category, or are there times when this does not apply?

KS, this is not an attack but an honest question (not looking to go on a shouting match with ya, I'd rather that be a thing of the past). To the best of my knowledge of the terms invasive and protected I don't see how a pheasants fits here in Kansas. Go to your local ag office and tell them you have invasive Johnson Grass or Sericea and they'll bend over backwards to help you kill it, to the point of cost sharing herbicides. Do pheasants fit the invasive definition?

08-Jun-24
“Pheasants are absolutely non-native and invasive. Just because they are managed as a game bird does not make them native. If you don't think they are protected then shoot one in July and take it to your local conservation officer.”

Where has anyone stated pheasants are native? As far as you saying they’re invasive, every definition I can find includes the words “harmful to the environment “. Nope.

You yourself just stated they are managed as a game bird. Exactly, just like every other game bird and game animal…they are managed, not protected. Most people understand the difference.

From: KSflatlander
08-Jun-24

KSflatlander's Link
A non-native species competes with other wildlife for forage, cover, and habitat; therefore, there is harm. You can debate how much harm but biologically they impact native competitors.

"Ring-necked Pheasants have been known to harass other ground-nesting birds such as Greater Prairie-Chickens and Gray Partridges (also introduced), and female pheasants occasionally lay their eggs in the nests of these species."

From: Tilzbow
08-Jun-24
KS,

How about us Nevada boys round up a third of our feral horses and ship them to KS, scatter them about your favorite hunting grounds, let them overpopulate, destroy the range, water sources, habitat and indigenous wildlife populations then ask you again in a few years to compare feral horses to pheasants. Sound like a good plan to you?

08-Jun-24
“Protected species are illegal to be harmed or killed. Do pheasants fall into this category, or are there times when this does not apply?”

There are times (hunting seasons, cockbirds only) when the protection from any harm does not apply. They are protected, but not absolutely.

Agree 100% that horses & burros have been put on a pretty unique pedestal, and for no good or scientific reason. And it’s pretty safe to say that if hunting them were to be as popular as Pheasant hunting, they would lose their “invasive” status in the minds of many, but even if their numbers were low and hunters (as a group) really wanted them to be there, they would still be Exotics….

And oh, by the way…. A lot of states require hunting licenses for hog hunting, and a good number appear to have seasons (at least on Public), so that would arguably constitute “protection” for Hogs, which certainly tick plenty of boxes on the Invasive checklist….

Good thing they aren’t Purty….

From: KSflatlander
08-Jun-24
Tilzbow- please show me where I advocated for feral horses. They are invasive and destructive. I simply answered the question about other invasive species that are protected. Pheasants are protected by law for the majority of their lives. Saying they aren't protected is splitting hairs a bit. For the record the Feds "manage" feral horses too. I've personally been on ranches that take feral horses and the rancher is paid to by the government keep them. So the feds removed them from the ecosystem and "managed" them by definition of other posters here.

Again, I'm not advocating for anything...certainly not feral horses.

From: Tilzbow
08-Jun-24
Fair enough. So rather than discuss semantics around “invasive” species maybe we can change the discussion to what can be done to enable and encourage the BLM to at least manage feral horses and burros to the management targets they’ve set.

From: Stoneman
08-Jun-24
^^^^ exactly why I started this thread… to discuss options and suggestions.

I have yet to see the BLM implement a consistent plan to manage and control these invasive feral horses though they continue to scar the landscape and encroach on indigenous animals at will…

11-Jun-24
Just for the record, I would be happy to hunt them….

And I’ll be glad to split the meat, because I am very sure that my wife won’t eat it!

ROFL….

From: Tilzbow
11-Jun-24
BLM has a decent plan to manage the horses, the problem is the special interest groups (liberal, do-gooder horse lover, city dwellers) who really have no idea of the damage being done (or don’t care) get in the way. Then there’s the problem of funding. Both could be solved if hunters and conservationists banded together and overwhelmed the other side. This effort has gotten some legs over the past years and there’s actually been collaboration between groups such as NBU (NV Bighorns Unlimited) and Sierra Club in recent years. The only way it’ll get done is through compromise and that’s getting more rare these days with so much extremism on both sides. Just scan any political thread on Bowsite and you’ll see this show up.

From: Highlife
12-Jun-24
You make a great point Scott. Living in the midwest I've no clue personally what's going on out there just what I've read about the it.

From: Thornton
12-Jun-24
My dad used to rope them in the 50's when he was in the AF in Southern California. They'd spot them in a tail dragger, land, hop in a willy's jeep, and chase them down. He said out of the 3 he roped, he could only get two of them broke. The gov't later came in and killed them all due to habitat destruction and food competition with wildlife. One time they flipped the jeep in a dry creek bed and had to leg press it off the top of them and walk 17 miles to the nearest highway to hitch a ride back to their ranch. Back when when there were still real men.

From: csalem
12-Jun-24
Dang good story Thornton Easy to see where you got it

From: Glunt@work
12-Jun-24
Your dad probably got a kick out of the movie "The Misfits". Clark Gable and Marylin Monroe catching mustangs with a plane and old truck near Reno.

From: TreeWalker
13-Jun-24
Feral horses and regular horses abandoned by owners all need controlled. What purpose do these animals serve as free-ranging animals on public property? Do they mitigate fire risk? Do they damage threatened vegetation or habitat through being on the public property and using resources? I have seen horses on public land in OR, NV and AZ. They appear to be destructive to habitat and negatively impact wildlife with no upside by being on those lands.

From: TreeWalker
13-Jun-24
Feral horses and regular horses abandoned by owners all need controlled. What purpose do these animals serve as free-ranging animals on public property? Do they mitigate fire risk? Do they damage threatened vegetation or habitat through being on the public property and using resources? I have seen horses on public land in OR, NV and AZ. They appear to be destructive to habitat and negatively impact wildlife with no upside by being on those lands.

From: Thornton
13-Jun-24
Glunt- my dad and grandpa both loved Westerns. The late actor, Ben Johnson that made all those western movies in the 50's and 60's used to visit my grandpa's ranch in El Centro Valley and train on his horses when he wasn't making movies. Dad said he roped with him quite a few times. There was another celebrity that would show up sometimes, but I can't remember his name.

13-Jun-24
“What purpose do these animals serve as free-ranging animals on public property? Do they mitigate fire risk?”

Evidently… they eat off all of the vegetation, so what’s left to burn?

Sure would be great to see a lot of hefty fines being assessed to people who dump their animals…. Make more people aware of the fact that there’s nothing at all “humane”, respectable or even tolerable about making your dog or cat or horse or snake or goldfish into somebody else’s problem….

If it weren’t for concerns over lead contamination of the carcasses, I’d say that it would make sense to let the National Guard, Army and Marine gunships get in some practice on moving targets…

Alternatively…. Post WWII, my dad crewed on a ship which was delivering Mustangs to Poland to help re-stock the countryside; they were needed to pull plows and carts…. Of course, Pop said all of the best specimens ended up with Russian officers on their backs….

And it seems to me that even in this century, our military has allies who depend on ponies to move around in-country…. Maybe they’re needed in places line Afghanistan??

From: Jim Moore
13-Jun-24
Back in the 40's my dad managed the Ruby Valley fish hatchery out here in Nevada. They would shoot those feral horses and turn them into fish food. Sounds like a great plan still but The city-bred horse lovers would have a melt-down these days. There is only so many that can be round up and "adopted" or moved to safe environments. At some point, they're going to have to be "managed" if you get my meaning.

From: csalem
13-Jun-24
In the 80s there were some efforts to shoot them. Bidding process I believe. Horse people stopped it after a couple of years

From: Zbone
13-Jun-24

Zbone's Link
Thought fitting for this thread:

"Adventures of a Wild Horse Bounty Hunter, From the Archives"

https://www.outdoorlife.com/conservation/wild-horse-bounty-hunting/?utm_term=ODL%20-%20061024&utm_campaign=Outdoor%20Life_Newsletter&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email

13-Jun-24

Corax_latrans's Link
Related piece here…

From: Thornton
13-Jun-24
If you're going to go that route, then whitetail deer are invasive. Just look at the fact mule deer have been eradicated from 90% of their home range in Kansas, and there is some argument that whitetails "push them out". The idiots in charge of the KDWP stock non native fish in Kansas reservoirs that compete with, and kill indigenous species.

13-Jun-24
Kind of a moot point, isn’t it??

Hell…. Most of the US, whitetail numbers and environmental impacts are on par with exotic invasives anyway…. And are pretty much managed accordingly… or would be, if hunters would cooperate….

From: Tilzbow
14-Jun-24
The article posted above by Corax should be read by everyone concerned and/or those not understanding the issue at hand. You truly can’t understand the environmental destruction these animals cause unless you see it first hand.

It also highlights the importance of voting. (Note the mention of the idiot democratic senator from NV introducing bill to further restrict gathers. That crap only passes if others from other states vote for other democrats with similar viewpoints.)

From: DL
14-Jun-24

DL's embedded Photo
DL's embedded Photo
Is this referring to illegal aliens?

If it was reported feral horses had the cure for cancer in their DNA there’d disappear in a week.

From: Stoneman
14-Jun-24
Good article CL

Even though it was written 2 years ago it is even more relevant today.

Last line in the story “Unless you count the burros, I haven’t seen a single wild animal all day.”

As Tilzbow states all hunters should be concerned.

From: DL
14-Jun-24
Someone I know said young burrow ribs are delicious.

14-Jun-24
“Someone I know…”

Was that “someone” by any chance a Cougar?? ;)

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