Mathews Inc.
Game Carts for Elk
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Whip 16-Aug-07
bear 16-Aug-07
jcneng 16-Aug-07
Kurve 16-Aug-07
Whip 16-Aug-07
passthrough 16-Aug-07
Bigdan 17-Aug-07
bear 17-Aug-07
Kurve 17-Aug-07
bullelkklr 17-Aug-07
Whip@work 17-Aug-07
moleshaver 17-Aug-07
bullelkklr 17-Aug-07
Brotsky 17-Aug-07
DL 17-Aug-07
Paul @ the Fort 18-Aug-07
Paul @ the Fort 18-Aug-07
Paul @ the Fort 18-Aug-07
DL 18-Aug-07
wapiti 1 18-Aug-07
Paul @ the Fort 18-Aug-07
Trekker1 18-Aug-07
DL 18-Aug-07
BIGHORN 18-Aug-07
BIGHORN 18-Aug-07
>>>---WW----> 18-Aug-07
DL 18-Aug-07
Paul @ the Fort 18-Aug-07
Bill in MI 18-Aug-07
Paul @ the Fort 18-Aug-07
Wild Bill 30-Apr-23
Buglemaster 01-May-23
Shiras42 01-May-23
Wild Bill 04-Jul-23
Pop-r 04-Jul-23
Jaquomo 05-Jul-23
Bowboy 05-Jul-23
Jaquomo 05-Jul-23
Pop-r 05-Jul-23
WYelkhunter 05-Jul-23
Jaquomo 05-Jul-23
Groundhunter 05-Jul-23
Pop-r 05-Jul-23
Paul@thefort 06-Jul-23
Wild Bill 23-Mar-24
wyobullshooter 23-Mar-24
Cheesehead Mike 23-Mar-24
From: Whip
16-Aug-07
We're headed to NM next month in an area that has quite a few open parks and meadows. There are some areas that might lend themsleves to getting back off the roads a good distance, and we are looking at options for getting an elk out if we do get lucky. We will have pack frames of course, and we have arrangements for horse packing if back in too far, but thinking about whether a game cart might come in handy. Do these things pull pretty easily with a heavy load? The ones I have seen have hard rubber wheels. Do they work OK on rough terrain? Or are there any with pnuematic tires?

From: bear
16-Aug-07
I hook my game cart up to an atv and it pulls rather easily. And yes, the cart has pneumatic tires. Bear

From: jcneng
16-Aug-07

jcneng's embedded Photo
jcneng's embedded Photo
I have one made by the CycleTote Corp in Ft. Collins CO and it works great in the mountains with a heavy load! I also use it for other things!

From: Kurve
16-Aug-07
the one i have has hard rubber tires. it works OK, much better with two people than one. in open areas that aren't too rocky or covered with blow downs, they work and easier then packing on the back.

since you have arrangements for horse packing if necessary, why bother.

From: Whip
16-Aug-07
We have the horse packing as a back up if we get in farther than we could reasonably pack out on our own. I'm looking at the cart idea to go maybe 1-2 miles and wondering if it would be easier than a pack frame. Since the area we will be in has lots of big open meadows they may work pretty well.

From: passthrough
16-Aug-07
Whip, I am not sure if this meets your needs but I have been hunting in areas like you are talking about. We have been using a metal landscaping wagon. It is the kind they have at Home Depot or the like. It is about 2' x 4' and you can strap the meat down. You can not fit a whole elk on it but if you quarter it you can move the whole thing in 2 trips. It is also nice to have around camp to gather wood and move items around so you can save your energy. It is certainly not something you can take in with you. You can down your elk and carry the horns out and bring the wagon back for the rest. Last year we were able to get an entire cow on the wagon and two of us pulled it about 3/4 of a mile to the road. It does have the pneumatic tires so I just bought and extra one it is faster to put a new tire on than try to repair it. Good luck.

From: Bigdan
17-Aug-07

Bigdan's embedded Photo
Bigdan's embedded Photo
This one works good

From: bear
17-Aug-07
what Dan said. Bear

From: Kurve
17-Aug-07
hopefully that's private land or an approved road and no one else's hunt was ruined in the process...that'll look good on the cover of RMEF.

From: bullelkklr
17-Aug-07
That works good on the blm dan - not so good on the refuge!

Where I go you can't hardly git a horse up the trail - ain't no person on this site could pull a cart up the trails I go on - down them either...not even nvagvup!

If it is mellow country, then yes, they work great...have used them in the Breaks many times - but you need to 2 people to pull a whole elk out - and watch out for side hill adobe's.....they are a b^%ch.

From: Whip@work
17-Aug-07
The area we will be in certainly has some steep stuff, but the tope of the mountains are fairly gentle compared to some areas I've hunted before. My thought would be to use pack frames to get an animal to a point that could be reached with a game cart. I many spots we could save a good mile or more of packing. We'll have a couple of ATV's but they aren't allowed off marked roads.

From: moleshaver
17-Aug-07
I got a nice one that I built after reading an article in Bowhunter magazine about 3 years ago. I've had several commercial ones over the years that didn't cut the mustard. It has a steel axle with motorcycle tires on it. I changed out the bearings so I could get a piece of 5/8" milled round steel through it instead of the smaller 1/2 or 3/8. But I milled that down from a piece of 1 1/4 steel on the last couple inches. I built the frame out of aluminum welded with steel screwed to all the corners and a few welds. The article has pretty much step by step instuctions and lots of pictures if you can find it. If you're interested in a real good one, that is.

From: bullelkklr
17-Aug-07
I will have to backpack mine out this year - 7 hours 1 way with a pack loaded.....I might have to rent Squirrel's llamas if we get more than 1 down at a time.

From: Brotsky
17-Aug-07
Speaking from personal experience, do not use a cart that has the hard plastic tires, or hard plastic spokes. I loaded 2 elk quarters on one and it collapsed under the weight on the first trip out (moderate terrain). I think if you went with a heavy duty one though on the terrain you describe you would be just fine.

From: DL
17-Aug-07
I saw one used to haul a spike out but it was on flat ground with no blow downs at all. It was a very small elk and it was tough evn with 2 people. I've read of fellas use a wheel barrow to use for hauling camping gear in and out. They were used to get back in where roads were chained. some of the big wheel barrows they use for hauling heavy loads and they are balanced with dual tires would work well on roads. You could carry 2-3 hundred pounds on flat roads. Other than that I would not even try to use one on any type of hillside. Can you imagine trying to go downhill and hitting a large area of pixy sticks. There would be a game cart left there for sure.

18-Aug-07

Paul @ the Fort's embedded Photo
Paul @ the Fort's embedded Photo
Used in the right places, this one wheeled game cart hauls in my backpack/bow/camp and if needed, can bring out 100# of boneless meat. It may require two trips for a bull and one for a cow but will not be good if in steep county with lots of blowdowns. Down hill locations is always better. I usually keep it in camp and when an animal is down, I debone and bag the animal and bring the cart back. If the meat bags need to be move to a more desirable locations, I do that, and then use the cart. I have been able to use it 4-5 times. Paul

18-Aug-07

Paul @ the Fort's embedded Photo
Paul @ the Fort's embedded Photo
I have never needed brakes and when coming down hill I can switch-back the hillside. The great thing about one wheel and along hillsides is that the cart will not turn over like a two wheeled card with both wheels on the ground. It works well on narrow horse or hiking trails but all carts will have some limits to their use.

There is a wide strap over my shoulders that connect to the hand area. This give me extra control and holding power with hands/arms and neck/shoulders. Hauling the cart backwards works good as I do not run into anything, but over or around.

I had an all rubber tire on it but over the years it rotted so I replaced it with a normal mt. bike tire and added "green" slime as tire protection. and now I change the tire/tube every two years.

This rig is 90 inch long and is made of 1 in. aircraft alum and a 20 bike wheel/tire. The area near the wheels is angled to keep a lower, parallel to the ground, profile which allows a lower center of gravity and ables the cart to go over rocks and logs.

18-Aug-07
I may add another 12 inches of length to the handle area.

From: DL
18-Aug-07
Why not try a travois like the indians used for hundreds of years. Definately stable and the way they made them they would flex over uneven surfaces.

From: wapiti 1
18-Aug-07
Paul Nice slippers! I'll call you latter.

18-Aug-07
DL, this cart is a modern day, travois, but with a wheel. The big difference is, I am the horse, and yes, with slippers. I tried to find some with elk faces on them but the store only had bunney head slippers and I had to watch my emage so I did not purchase them. Paul

From: Trekker1
18-Aug-07
I have the Cabelas Super Mag Hauler. Last year I used one I had built that was made out of plywood, but over the years started to rot. I liked it cuz it was low to the ground and never tipped. My friend has the smaller version of the Super Mag Hauler but it is high off the ground and tips all time, where the Super Mag is low and wide. As far as whether it would be useful depends on the terrain you'll be hunting. Where I hunt, it's steep till I get to camp and then it's a flat, long haul out to the truck. Last year I packed an elk from up high to camp and then from camp to the truck on my old cart. Worked slick.

From: DL
18-Aug-07
The ones I was refering to were an A frame with the narrow end up front and the widest part on the ground to stabilze it. Having it the opposite way isn't as stable. I wonder if the wide end had a wheel on each end. More stable also if the wheels would be able to camber side to side for stability. They would be like the wheels on the front of a dragster that leans side to side to turn. My issues with any type of carrier that's out now is stability. The one that Paul has would launch you if the wheel dropped off and leaned to one side, plus wearing slippers wouldn't help. Those aren't actually slippers they are stalking shoes. I have a pair in the house to sneak away from my wife when she's calling me to take out the garbage.

From: BIGHORN
18-Aug-07
Paul,

The first picture of you is the best. He he he You are a good man, I don't care what the others are saying about you.

From: BIGHORN
18-Aug-07
WW,

Did you get him by the horse pond or the spring?

18-Aug-07
By the pond Merle. I'll try to get a pictur up one of these days.

Paul, I used my Kawasaki game cart and tinny runners. LOL!

From: DL
18-Aug-07
My cart last year was my 29 year old son. No straps no wheels, just had to feed him.

18-Aug-07
Bill, can't do that where I hunt. good luck this year, Paul

From: Bill in MI
18-Aug-07
In NM wilderness areas (and anywhere I believe) Pauls cart would be banned.

Is this so? Has anyone tried it and/or discussed it with a CO?

Being a smaller framed guy, a single wheel cart like that would be awesome!

Brand/Model/Price?? Thx Bill in MI

18-Aug-07
Yes, my cart is not allowed an a Wilderness Area, along with bikes or motorized vehicle.

Not made any more and I purchased it in 1989 and paid 105$. The model was the "Mule". It would be easy to build. Paul

From: Wild Bill
30-Apr-23
I have a Hawk Crawler game cart for warm weather hunts, and a sled for snow country. In Idaho, ANYTHING motorized is not allowed off road. During the October rifle hunt, I usually find my bull elk somewhere below snow level in transition zones. Taking my game cart with me into the field using logging roads and hiking trails, I park my gear just long enough to take a shot. Usually, I can haul out a complete deboned elk in one trip. Hunting public land, by the time rifle season happens, the bow hunters have run the elk down onto private land so hunting the fence lines between public and private becomes a proven technique for elk and mule deer.

From: Buglemaster
01-May-23
I have one I built off of Paul’s design. It is an awesome cart that makes hauling a load a lot easier.

From: Shiras42
01-May-23
Wow, resurrecting a 16 year old thread. Even Paul was young when this one started. :)

From: Wild Bill
04-Jul-23
I use a Hawk Crawler game cart for hunting elk. 67 with bad joints, I'm limited to certain types of terrain (transition zones) which easily supports the use of a game cart. It carries everything I need which makes the trip 2-3 miles away from the pickup easier.

From: Pop-r
04-Jul-23
I'm curious how one found this thread to be able to comment on it.

From: Jaquomo
05-Jul-23
Google search for game carts for elk?

From: Bowboy
05-Jul-23

Bowboy's Link
Get a pack wheel cart. Last season I saw a guy with one. There kinda pricey though.

From: Jaquomo
05-Jul-23
I have an older friend with a heart problem who has a motorized Pack Wheel, who has packed out several elk with it. He says it's wonderful, takes out two quarters at a time with panniers. While technically illegal, he said nobody has ever bothered him.

From: Pop-r
05-Jul-23
I guess you're right Lou. I was just curious since you can't find it here and I didn't know a Google search would link back into the thread. Interesting. (To me anyway)

I use a cart some and they're handy dandy! You'll carry a heck of alot more on a cart than your back on easy ground. I had to extend the handle end of it to make it more comfortable and I try to have an extra pin or two on it as the sage loves to rob them! I've put higher quality ones on it than it came with but I may bolt it all together at some point if it gives me anymore trouble.

From: WYelkhunter
05-Jul-23
Who cares if it is an old thread. He is adding to it and when people do a search they will find info all in one thread,, It makes sense in my head any way. I am going to be using a pack wheel this year for the first. messing around with it here at home it seems like it will be amazing. Due to health issues I am using the motorized one in non wilderness areas and will see what happens if I get checked.

From: Jaquomo
05-Jul-23
WY, you won't get checked unless you crash into the side of a USFS LEO truck. I tried hard to get a ticket on closed roads on my ebike, and the only event was when a USFS supervisor rode along with me one day on his conventional MTB and said, "I need to get one of those!"

From: Groundhunter
05-Jul-23
I like a horse.

From: Pop-r
05-Jul-23
It all went over your head wyelkdude.

From: Paul@thefort
06-Jul-23

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo

From: Wild Bill
23-Mar-24
I prefer a horse pack out if possible. My second choice is a game cart pack out. And my last choice is a backpack to haul my meat out. Being an older DIY solo hunter, I believe in the, "Keep it simple" school of thought. Nowadays, with all the hiking trails and back country roads making access easier, why not work smarter and not harder?

23-Mar-24
I also subscribe to the work smarter, not harder train of thought. If an elk dies on one of those hiking trails or back country roads, I agree a game cart works great. If it dies a quarter mile from one of those trails or roads, struggling with it through seemingly endless downfall is anything but working smarter not harder.

23-Mar-24

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
I use my homemade cart when I can. It's hauled a handful of elk, a few bears and countless deer. I'm thinking about building a one wheeled cart like Paul's.

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