Sitka Mountain Gear
Put up a cabin OR buy an RV?
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
nov3 16-Sep-07
John Elder 16-Sep-07
bullnuts 16-Sep-07
mmbowhntr 16-Sep-07
nov3 16-Sep-07
OldFart 16-Sep-07
mmbowhntr 16-Sep-07
nov3 16-Sep-07
elmer 16-Sep-07
mmbowhntr 16-Sep-07
chip 16-Sep-07
nov3 17-Sep-07
mmbowhntr 17-Sep-07
Earl E Nove...mber 17-Sep-07
Sage Buffalo 17-Sep-07
BULELK1@work 17-Sep-07
Stalker 17-Sep-07
squid 17-Sep-07
Northwoods 17-Sep-07
Northwoods 17-Sep-07
chip 17-Sep-07
Genesis 17-Sep-07
nov3 17-Sep-07
jdbuckshot 17-Sep-07
Genesis 17-Sep-07
Bogey 17-Sep-07
OldFart 17-Sep-07
carbonarcher 17-Sep-07
Sage Buffalo 17-Sep-07
badlander 17-Sep-07
BMizl 17-Sep-07
Rob in VT 17-Sep-07
KSArcher 17-Sep-07
Beev 17-Sep-07
Genesis 17-Sep-07
cbeard64 17-Sep-07
bill brown 17-Sep-07
BigWoods 17-Sep-07
Ron 17-Sep-07
sharpshooter 17-Sep-07
20 ft up 17-Sep-07
20 ft up 17-Sep-07
Doc 18-Sep-07
Kurve 18-Sep-07
nov3 18-Sep-07
chip 18-Sep-07
BigWoods 18-Sep-07
nov3 18-Sep-07
Jim Hargest 18-Sep-07
E2 18-Sep-07
Trebarker 18-Sep-07
nov3 18-Sep-07
Jim Hargest 18-Sep-07
COUGAR 19-Sep-07
Bow Crazy 19-Sep-07
Bow Crazy 19-Sep-07
Bow Crazy 19-Sep-07
nov3 19-Sep-07
N1CK in Mi 19-Sep-07
Mathewsman 19-Sep-07
bullnuts 19-Sep-07
stayfit 19-Sep-07
benderofwood 19-Sep-07
flat 20-Sep-07
Bow Crazy 20-Sep-07
nov3 20-Sep-07
Muzzy 21-Sep-07
treecrawler 23-Sep-07
SERBIANSHARK 24-Sep-07
nov3 24-Sep-07
Chuck'M 24-Sep-07
Silverback 09-Oct-18
W 09-Oct-18
midwest 10-Oct-18
drslyr 10-Oct-18
Charlie Rehor 10-Oct-18
grubby 10-Oct-18
GotBowAz 10-Oct-18
BigOzzie 10-Oct-18
kadbow 10-Oct-18
12yards 10-Oct-18
Jaquomo 10-Oct-18
Schmitty78 10-Oct-18
r-man 10-Oct-18
skinnyindian 10-Oct-18
PECO 10-Oct-18
bfisherman11 10-Oct-18
zeke 10-Oct-18
cord 62 10-Oct-18
cord 62 10-Oct-18
jrb(CO) 11-Oct-18
South Farm 11-Oct-18
From: nov3
16-Sep-07
I'm purchasing some ground about 3 hours from home. It's for deer and turkey hunting with my boys. I had planned on constructing a small cabin there but a buddy suggested I buy and RV or camper to pull when we go. I could buy a nice set up for what I was going to spend on a cabin.

Cabin pros: appreciates in value, more roomy, wife will be more likely to tag along (and cook)

Camper pros: won't increase property taxes, less worry about vandalism, cheaper

Anyone have any experience here? What am I missing?

Shawn

shawn@huntwithakid.com www.huntwithakid.com

From: John Elder
16-Sep-07
Around here, a cabin would be a mistake. You would have unwanted visitors, and probably a meth lab, which would turn your cabin into a hazardous materials cleanup site. Being 3 hours away, no way would I ever consider that, unless I had a trusted neighbor to keep an eye on it. John

From: bullnuts
16-Sep-07
You can take your RV to other places - a cabin sits right there forever. Plus, with the RVs these days, they're just as roomy as a small cabin. A little bit of maintenance on the RV, but you can do that while it's parked in your yard - a cabin? You have to go there to clean it and maintain it.

From: mmbowhntr
16-Sep-07
How often will you be using the property?

From: nov3
16-Sep-07
So that's 2 votes for the RV.

Good points.

I'm trying to be objective but, emotionally, I'm still attached to the idea of a cabin. I like the thought of kicking back by the wood stove after a hard day's hunt.

Thanks for the input.

From: OldFart
16-Sep-07
Shawn I had to decide what you are deciding about 6 yrs ago. i decided on a cabin and am glad I did. There are several pros and cons. Unless you can dedicate yourself for a lot of time, don't decide on a cabin. It took 2 years out of my life and I was retired. That's even considering that we hired out some parts of building. I started with a dome kit. Although the initial dome framework, including riser wall went up in a day and a half, that was only a small beginning. Be awfully careful about choosing contractors. I got taken for 5K by a contractor who didn't do the job, there were 5 other complaints to the BBB on him, but only after I hired him. I'm glad I did the cabin but I would buy a modular ( can't have a mobile home in my area) instead. Your RV will depreciate greatly, will restrict the number of guests and will have electric and propane requirements that will be hard to maintain over a period of time. You could also save on gas by being able to drive your car instead of your RV. If you have further questions, PM me Ray

From: mmbowhntr
16-Sep-07
Cabin would be my choice. We are starting one next spring on our property that is 2 plus hours away.

From: nov3
16-Sep-07
I'm guessing we'd be there about 10-12 days per deer season and maybe 5 per turkey season.

Off hunting season we'd probably use it a couple days a month (hanging out, getting away, mushroom hunting, and so on).

We'd have to go small (probably 400-500 sq. ft.).

I would also have to decide what to do about electric and water.

The whole purpose is spending time with family and making memories with the kids. I picture that happening best if we have a cabin but I don't know that for sure.

From: elmer
16-Sep-07
Electric you could get a generator or go old fashioned and use propane for lighting and forget the electricity

From: mmbowhntr
16-Sep-07
We are running a generator.We are going small as well, building bunk beds that hang on the wall for more space.

From: chip
16-Sep-07
Get yourself a trailer and tow it up there. Much better than a RV.

From: nov3
17-Sep-07
Chip,

You mean a camper trailer?

From: mmbowhntr
17-Sep-07
A buddy of mine bought a shed from home depot on clearance. He insulated it, sealed it, and turned it into his cabin. Has been using it for 2 years now and has no complaints. Total cost was about $3,000 I think. He makes improvements every year. Just a thought?

17-Sep-07
Shed/Cabin....the Amish make them around here in Illinois (storage building type) but just like a "Cabin"! Sometimes they even deliver and setup the unit. All wood and well constructed and with whatever window doors a person wants.....you could do the insulating and drywall or plywood walls yourself. ON SKIDS so it's NOT PERMANANT and Taxable!

Just a thought! Some Farm Stores sell them also. Just keeping vandals away may be a problem....depending on where it's at!

17-Sep-07
On the other hand there are a boat load of older RV's out there low mileage well cared for and fully depreciated.(Just old and poor gas mileage) Pour a parking slab and a patio. Put power to the pole and and a propane tank. Drag your small pickup, SUV behind when you go .

If after a couple of years that isn't working, get a garage kit from the lumber yard and build a cabin, You'll have the RV to live in while building it and when done you can sell the old tub for what you paid for it.

From: Sage Buffalo
17-Sep-07
If you are only thinking of being up there 15 days is there a hotel/motel/BB near the area?

There have been studies done on second homes/properties more than 2 hours from home. The numbers aren't good on people using them past that 2 hour drive.

I just can't see building a cabin for 15 days. A RV or camper will much more useful as you will be able to take that elsewhere.

My vote RV/Camper.

From: BULELK1@work
17-Sep-07
My Mrs and I went back and forth on buying a new RV or getting ground and building a cabin/log home...

It finally came down to the fact that we are both gone alot to alot of different states (and in her personal travels--country's) so we really didn't want to sacrifice the mobility option for a here it is cabin stay here .......... type deal.

You have the ground for appreciation value/investment... get the RV type deal and you can be mobile anywhere ya want to go....family vacations to hunting trips out-of-state...

Good luck, Robb

From: Stalker
17-Sep-07
a Cabin, all the way

we can't sit around afraid of what might happen, if we do the thugs win.

build the cabin, put insurance on it, pay the increased taxes, and enjoy. you'll probably find out you use it more in the off season than you think.

From: squid
17-Sep-07
I'll weigh in on this one since I made this decision last year.

Bought property 3 hours away from where we live. Choices we looked at were 1) Small Cabin, 2) Park Trailer - (The are trailers that you don't tow often) 3.) RV

After a lot of number crunching, looking and deciding, we went down the RV path. Bottom line this will be a personal choice. Our RV is fully self sufficient with enough water and generated electricity to go about a week without issues.

Biggest reason we went this route was flexibility. We still plan on building a cabin some day but this option allows us to do the following. 1. Invest little into the property in the way of Septic, Well, Electric ETC. Just to have the base stuff with surveying was going to cost around 50K. 2. Come and go as we please without worries of maintaining remote land / camp. 3. Keep saving for what we want in a cabin and not settling short for a lower cost solution. 4. Decide if this is THE SPOT we want to make perminent. Might change our minds or find a better area.

One thing to consider to make a misteak with an RV or Trailer is a lot less expensive to make a misteak with a permanent cabin. Buy a cheap used RV or Trailer, try out the property / area for a year or two, then make up your mind.

Feel free to PM me as I said I analyzed this in every way possible.

Oh, and congradulations on the land!

Squid

From: Northwoods
17-Sep-07
There just isn't enough information to tell you what you should do. Personally, we have a cabin that we built about six or seven years ago. Where we are at, in the "north" a camper just wouldn't cut it as far as keeping warm in the winter or with any number of people. We did all the work ourselves, except the concrete slab and the well (although, depending on soil type, a sandpoint could be pounded and eliminate the need for a well).

I love having a cabin and wouldn't trade it for any camper or RV ever. But they do require work and upkeep, but thats part of the fun, plus there is alot of pride in keeping something you built with your own hands well maintained. As far as break ins, just keep the place locked up and don't leave any valuables in it. A few motion lights don't hurt either. But if you plan on break ins or meth labs, I figure you've already lost and our society has gone to pot.

On a final note, if you are looking for ideas, I've heard of people buying "garage kits" or garages and turning them into cabins that end up pretty nice by adding a few windows and insulating. There are alot of different "garage kits" out there that can make unique cabin/storage combinations.

From: Northwoods
17-Sep-07
There just isn't enough information to tell you what you should do. Personally, we have a cabin that we built about six or seven years ago. Where we are at, in the "north" a camper just wouldn't cut it as far as keeping warm in the winter or with any number of people. We did all the work ourselves, except the concrete slab and the well (although, depending on soil type, a sandpoint could be pounded and eliminate the need for a well).

I love having a cabin and wouldn't trade it for any camper or RV ever. But they do require work and upkeep, but thats part of the fun, plus there is alot of pride in keeping something you built with your own hands well maintained. As far as break ins, just keep the place locked up and don't leave any valuables in it. A few motion lights don't hurt either. But if you plan on break ins or meth labs, I figure you've already lost and our society has gone to pot.

On a final note, if you are looking for ideas, I've heard of people buying "garage kits" or garages and turning them into cabins that end up pretty nice by adding a few windows and insulating. There are alot of different "garage kits" out there that can make unique cabin/storage combinations.

From: chip
17-Sep-07
Nov3-yes a trailer. 16-20 foot long that you could tow up and drop on your property. Then you still have your car-truck to get around. The main negative about the RV is that if you have engine problems on the way to the hunt you are in a jam. I also see you are from Indiana. If you get any snow during the hunt you will have a problem. Also a trailer is a hell of a lot cheaper than a RV and you will have more interior room.

From: Genesis
17-Sep-07
I faced your same dilemma 5 years ago and opted to go with a cabin despite the 10 hour distance.We love it.I can't image the close end feeling in a camper after a couple days of good rain.

From: nov3
17-Sep-07
Actually, we live in Ohio now but snow could still be an issue. You guys have given me a lot of things to think about. That's why I love this website- learning from the experience of others.

JackB, the kids are 8, 6, 5, 3, and <1. We've got a lot of years together to enjoy the property assuming we stay in Ohio.

HeadHunter, we are actually buying the property from an Amish family that does construction. I'm capable of building a cabin myself and was planning to but changed my mind when he told me that he could construct a 16X26 log cabin for $12-15K.

From: jdbuckshot
17-Sep-07
Cabin,

I would go cabin all the way, Nothing like sitting on the front porch of the cabin enjoying a nice evening after a spring turkey hunt! It will add to the experience for the kids and burn memories in there minds that there kids will oneday experience. build it your self and save a ton of money, if you dont know anything about building a house, or wiring or plumbing, go buy a 30 dollar book and you will learn enough to do it your self. you will make mistakes, but hey its YOUR cabin, you can do what ever you want! good luck and post pics!

JD

From: Genesis
17-Sep-07
Watching my sons heading to a gobbling bird while I sip coffee on the deck.......priceless.

From: Bogey
17-Sep-07

Bogey's embedded Photo
Bogey's embedded Photo
Cabin, My family has had a cabin that was built by my grandfather and father when my father was a kid (we're talking 50 years ago). I go there now, with my kids and family. It's a great thing to be passed on from generation to generation.

And when I say cabin - that's what I mean - nothing fancy. Small - it started out 12 x 14 and then another rom of the same size was added later and we just took the middle wall out this year. Running water is outside. Outhouse. No electricity. There are plenty of propane products on the market to help make it comfortable - wall lights, cooking stoves. A wood stove is tough in really cold weather as you have to add wood during the night. We actually have a wood stove and a kerosene heater (this one can run all weekend).

The only thing you have to keep in mind when constructing is that you need to seal it as tight as possible to keep out bats. You'll never keep mice out - eventually they will get in and they love insulation... A screened in porch is also nice to sit outside.

From: OldFart
17-Sep-07
Greets fm CO Building codes can be an issue. Park county CO has tougher codes than Aurora, the city where I live. It's specifically mentioned in the "subdivision" where my cabin is that sheds are not to be used for stayingin. Also wells and septic are required as well as a mandatory distance fm well to septic, septic must also be downhill fm well. I would rcommend getting the electric done by a contractor, prob plumbing and sewer too. The inspectors won't be so likely to be so picky if they do the work, however nothing we did ever failed an inspection, only contractor's work. Also, it's no fun driving an RV on icy and snow packed roads, something we have lots of here in CO. Ray

From: carbonarcher
17-Sep-07
Well my initial vote would have been for about a 25-30" fifth wheel type RV, take it anywhere, able to use for family vacations and out of state hunts. But if this Amish guy you are buying the land from will build you a 16x26' log cabin for 12-15k, then I would go that route, because that is a STEAL! But I would always check out some of his previous work first and see what anyone else he has built for thinks of his work. But generally the Amish are pretty trustworthy. Also, you won't get much of an RV for 2 adults and 5 kids for 12-15k.

From: Sage Buffalo
17-Sep-07
What do you guys think of only using it 15-20 days a year?

A cabin seems like a lot of money for a few weeks a year.

From: badlander
17-Sep-07
I had a 2001 31' RV parked on a lake lot up until this summer.

This this spring we noticed a small soft spot in the floor so I decided that I would repair it. It turned out that the main slide out was leaking and the main frame work for the RV was rotted out on that side. My $10,000 retreat at the lake cost me another $4000 this summer and has now been sold. I will never own another RV.

Also, most RVs don't do too well when used in the late fall/winter unless you keep them heated all the time. The heating up and cooling down with propane heat creates a lot of moisture that the wood frames & materials (which are genrally un-treated) just love to soak up and begin to rot. Not to mention the wall paper starts to curl, linoleum cracks and curls with the moisture and that fake wood covering on particle board that most are finished with begins to curl and wrinkle right away when heating and cooling it in cold weather.

If you do get one and run it infrequently in cold weather get a dehumidifier.

Food for thought.

From: BMizl
17-Sep-07
Talk to an tax accountant in your state.

In MN if you add an improvement (cabin, garage) with a functional toilet the interest on the mortgage is a 100% deduction (as long as it's your 2nd home, not 3rd,...)

BM

From: Rob in VT
17-Sep-07
I live in central Vermont and my 40 acres is 2,200 miles away in southern Colorado. We plan on building a cabin a 2 years. This will be a hunting cabin for me and my buddies/family, a summer vacation cabin, and ultimately a retirement cabin in years to come. I do have trustworthy neighbors, so I'm not too concerned with vandals.

As mentioned previously, it's much easier to get the wife there with a roof, 4 walls, and indoor plumbing than on 4 tires and a steel frame! Plus it's something the kids will be able to enjoy for many years to come. Oh, the elk and mule deer hunting isn't bad either :^)

. . . Rob

From: KSArcher
17-Sep-07
I was in your shoes 5 years ago when we bought out place and at the time, decided to go with an RV. It's served us well but we outgrew it very fast. Wished we had started witht the cabin from the git-go. We are very cramped and now can't afford the cabin (cuz we started a new business).

KSArcher~~~

From: Beev
17-Sep-07
We built a cabin last year and love it. Ours is only 15 min. away and is situated in the middle of my hunting area. We are out there more weekends than not and stay out there most of the summer. It's the perfect place for birthday parties and my kids are contantly having friends out to stay. For us a cabin was the only way to go but we do have a different situation.

From: Genesis
17-Sep-07
"What do you guys think of only using it 15-20 days a year?"

That's about the same amount of time as we were spending.Now with a cabin,it's twice that.

From: cbeard64
17-Sep-07
Cabin.

From: bill brown
17-Sep-07
We've got a small cabin with electricity, no water or plumbing. Doesn't cost much to do it this way, and we truck in our water. Used to have a camper. This is heaven compared to the camper.

From: BigWoods
17-Sep-07
I couldn't imagine being in a camper with 5 kids!!! Definately go with a cabin and put them little rascals in the loft at bedtime! As your kids age and demand more room they ain't gonna all want to be cooped up in a camper, trust me.

From: Ron
17-Sep-07
I retired several years ago and bought a used RV. Just got rid of it for junk price. Most won't last that long and up keep from letting them just set most of the year is not cheap. Cost of 10 miles to the gallon have to come in there some where. Don't think anything beats a small primitive cabin that you can pass on to your kids.

From: sharpshooter
17-Sep-07
The cabin with electric and a well do increase the property value quite a bit also. We did it about ten years ago and I couldn't imaging my property without it. It's nice to be able to shower and all that. If you have a cabin you will also find more excuses for going to the property.

From: 20 ft up
17-Sep-07
Put this debate to bed already and build the cabin. My brother and I had the same dilemma 6 yrs. ago now. We had built a 20'X 20' cabin with half loft. Best money we ever spent. Cabin is 2 1/2hr drive away. We make a trip down once a month just to cut grass and do routine maintenance. In the fall we hunt probably 15-20 days. No well, no septic. We do have electric and a wood burner. Nothing like kicking your tired feet up in front of the burner after an all day hunt. I could ramble on and on...

17-Sep-07
Shawn- my husband and I have been both routes and while there are pros and cons to both a cabin and a camper, the cabin has won out for us hands down. We have many fond memories of the camper, but the night we almost got blown away by a tornado was not one of them. The year it rained every weekend through deer season was another notable memory being stuck in that damper, I mean camper. We almost went stir crazy, and the wet clothes and boots everywhere dripping on all of our bedding and what few dry clothes we had sure didn't add to the fun. With a cabin on the other hand, you won't likely have to worry about flat tires, leaks and condensation problems. You also have the option to add on to it later. Good luck in whatever you choose!

-Cheryl

From: 20 ft up
17-Sep-07
...the front porch to sit on, the bunk beds, the fire wood you cut and split in February only to burn in November, the elbow room, THE CABIN.

From: Doc
18-Sep-07
My Dad and I built a cabin 2 years ago. Been adding to it since, but once it was weather tight and insulated we were staying in it for deer season. Just finished adding a bathroom and water. Still haven't got the deck on yet but its been a blast working on together. On the other hand my wife and I bought a camper this summer for her to stay in a couple nights a week as we live about an hour from her school. (shes in grad school and 1.5 hours less driving means 1.5 hours more sleep). The camper is great for us to stayin (30ft 5th wheel with big slide) but I've been working on it here and there ever since we bought it. Little leak here little leak there. Still like the camper and it has all the amenities for way less money than what we have in the cabin, but the cabins twice the size. Hard choice just keep in mind the $100 in gas it will cost to haul that camper anytime.

From: Kurve
18-Sep-07
if you buy one of the 'pre fab' sheds to modify and use as a cabin, or build your own on site, make sure you install smoke detectors, CO2 detectors and the windows are big enough for emergency egress (especially in the sleeping areas).

i think the idea of a travel trailer or 5th wheeler is a better idea. as for the comforts and wife tagging along, these things are like a house inside in terms of features and comfort. they have showers, etc.

you could build just a roof structure to park it under, and maybe erect one of those screened tents for getting away from the bugs and sitting and eating outdoors. a roof with open sides isn't as prone to vandalism.

From: nov3
18-Sep-07
You guys keep giving me one great insight after another.

Can't tell you how much I appreciate how seriously everyone has taken my question (as this is a fairly big decision).

Thanks so much.

Although I haven't made up my mind, I think we are leaning toward a cabin. One of the reasons is because I want to be able to bless our friends and family by making it available to them as well.

From: chip
18-Sep-07
Nov3 -Well bless you too. Speaking for all your friends here on Bowsite we accept your invitation to join you and the family at your cabin during the peak of the Rut. Mighty generous of you. I am sure the guys here will chip in with food and drink and wiil make it a very special time for all. Good hunting!

From: BigWoods
18-Sep-07
Sounds like a party!

From: nov3
18-Sep-07
Chip,

If you make the trip from NJ, I bet we can work something out. So many people have been so generous to me and my family over the years. . . what kind of person would I be if I accept generosity but didn't extend it? And I'm quite serious.

After catching me trying to steal a piece of pizza from the lunch line, my high school principal challenged me, "Shawn, instead of seeing how much you can get from others in life, why not see how much you can give?" Reminds me of something Someone else said (Acts 20:35b). That stuck in my mind and I've found that it's a better way to live. I just wish I could do it more consistently.

Of course, you'd have to promise to miss any bucks you get a shot at.

From: Jim Hargest
18-Sep-07

Jim Hargest's embedded Photo
Jim Hargest's embedded Photo
I was going to offer up my opinion. Now i'm afraid i'll have self-invited guests. LOL

Seriously, i've done both. We've been using our trailer up at our Wy. property and it's been fun. The drawbacks are hauling water and sewage out of there and the cramped quarters.

We've been staying in the trailer while we get a cabin up. It's been a chore and we're almost done. I'll hook up the propane this weekend and that will finish the job. The plusses of the cabin outweigh the trailer. We'll still use the trailer to travel with and have the cabin too. Our thinking was this: we'll be retiring up there and we can stay as long as we want in the cabin. Even over the tough winters. Where our cabin is located there's year rourd recreation. We went ahead and installed a septic system for our cabin and the house we'll build. We also have a well now and it's set up for the cabin and home too.

Later we'll have a guest cabin and our main cabin. Friends and family can come visit and we'll have lots of room. Not to mention the investment we've made. I can easily rent the cabin all winter or summer if I like. People are already bugging us to rent it from us. The view and location from our cabin is priceless. We have some people who keep an eye on it for us while we're gone. It's great to have good neighbors. Now when the weather is bad we can still stay in the cabin and enjoy the property. The camper was kind of cramped.

Hopefully this gives a little insight. PM me if you have any questions.

From: E2
18-Sep-07
The only way I'd go with a an RV or Trailer is if you already have another use for one. If you've wished you had one at least a couple times a year, then maybe that will work.

Otherwise I'd opt for a small cabin.

Jim Hargest mentioned hauling out sewage as a drawback. I have an option for that too. A composting toilet. I picked one up back in 2005 for just under $1000 and I haven't had to empty the compost yet. When you do empty it, it's dry so it isn't very heavy and makes good fertilizer, in fact the company advertised by picturing nice ripe tomatos grown with the compost used as fertilizer....not sure I'd do that though.

From: Trebarker
18-Sep-07
I can see benefits of both, and can see problems for each as well.

I like the idea of a camper, you can enjoy it wherever it will go. A cabin only allows you to enjoy it on the property it's built on.

A cabin with improvements will add to the value of the property. A camper only depreciates with use.

A generator, a full water tank, and an ample supply of fuel makes a camper comfortable for the family members who arent into roughing it. If those conviences arent not needed, simply go without. A simple cabin without improvements make it less than desirable for those not into nature. The generator would provide basic electricity at the cabin, permenant installation costs for elec. and water can make it cost prohibitive.

Long term investment; If you plan to someday build a home and live at the land, I would build a steel barn package with living quarters, water, electric and sewer.

From: nov3
18-Sep-07
Jim,

A picture is worth a thousand words. Yours might be worth a couple thousand. Beautiful! If I wasn't so far away I'd be one of those dreaded self-invited guests. How many sq ft is that one?

E2, do you have a website link?

From: Jim Hargest
18-Sep-07
Shawn, PM Sent.

From: COUGAR
19-Sep-07
I prefer an RV for its mobility. You may want to take a trip with it and the cabin is harder to tow! LOL! Also, in some circumstances, the RV can be written off your taxes as a second residence IF it is totally self contained. Just my $.02.

From: Bow Crazy
19-Sep-07

Bow Crazy's embedded Photo
Bow Crazy's embedded Photo
I was in the same boat as you 2 years ago, I decided to build the cabin and I'm so glad I did. I made it nice enough that my wife enjoys coming for a night. The kids love it. Weather isn't an issue.

One of my concerns was money. I got a free front door, free siding, new window of high quality cheap from leftovers from a window salesman, you get the idea. All you have to do is ask around, all the stuff I got was new or in great shape. Mine is 12'x16' with a loft for sleeping. The lofts sleeps 4, 5 if 4 are kids. No electricity, no water. Outhouse, oil lanterns, bring in water, propane heat. I built it on cement blocks, it will be easy to move when it is time for me to build a bigger, permanent cabin.

Attached are some photos - front porch is coming hopefully this fall!

BC

From: Bow Crazy
19-Sep-07

Bow Crazy's embedded Photo
Bow Crazy's embedded Photo
An interior for you. The interior has been insulated and the walls are up.

BC

From: Bow Crazy
19-Sep-07

Bow Crazy's embedded Photo
Bow Crazy's embedded Photo
Another interior.

BC

From: nov3
19-Sep-07
BC, very nice! You sound resourceful. Should I choose the cabin route I may appoint you as foreman.

Great pictures too.

From: N1CK in Mi
19-Sep-07

N1CK in Mi's embedded Photo
N1CK in Mi's embedded Photo
id say buy a cabin for sure youll love the purchase,may even be the best investment yet. my dad put up a cabin on our propert when i was 4 years old wich was 11 years ago. theres been so many good memeroies there its unexplanable. just remeber a house is the most expensive thing you can buy.Have fun and good luck with you descisoin. Nick in Mi

From: Mathewsman
19-Sep-07

Mathewsman's embedded Photo
Mathewsman's embedded Photo
This is our cabin that has been in the family since 1937 (moved and rebuilt once, snow caved it in). On a big swamp in the northern lower. Deer hunting isn't the best, we do most of our serious hunting in the U.P. But you can't beat a weekend up at camp with all the uncles and cousins. The rafters really roar

From: bullnuts
19-Sep-07
I personally own a small camping trailer - a 20 foot model - that I tow around with my truck and three kids, wife, and two dogs. Yes, it's cramped! But we go to a bunch of different lakes each summer, hunt out of it in the fall, and have an absolute ball! The trailer is just a place to sleep and get in out of the rain, otherwise, we're outside under the awning, by the campfire, or kicking around the water or in the woods. I'd love to upgrade at some point, but when I do, I'll get a bigger trailer - probably a 30 foot 5th wheel - that will give us a bigger place to hang our hats, play cards, and move around without stepping on each other. On another note, a friend of mine had your same decision to make a few years ago. He bought the 5th wheel and constructed a nice covered patio deck on his property. He pulls the camper up onto the pad, which positions the door right next to the deck, and they have one heckuva nice retreat!

From: stayfit
19-Sep-07
we bought a used construction trailer, about 22'I believe and turned it into a camp house by adding a covered front porch and deck - when we lost our hunting lease we moved the trailer to the new one.

So it was a bit camphouse and a bit trailer - a compromise to what you all have been discussing.

From: benderofwood
19-Sep-07
Without a doubt, the cabin; I have one and can't tell the joy that it brings;

From: flat
20-Sep-07
WE've got one very similar to Bow Crazys... except we went with the barnstyle and have a full loft upstairs - 3 bunk beads and room on the floor = we can get 8 in it but you trip over each other. 6 is doable, 4 works well and 2 is down right comfy! :D Also 12, 16 but the barn style with 8" lower walls lets us stand up in the 2nd floor. We insulated and a "Big Buddy" (dueal burner) heater keeps the whole place toasty. Propane lamps and we bringout water... very nice and a lot more satisfying than a trailer.

From: Bow Crazy
20-Sep-07
Flat, that sounds cool. Do you have any photos?

After reading bullnuts post there are also good reasons to buy a trailor. If you will use it for other purposes throughout the year, then park in the fall for a hunting "cabin" that would be a good way to go.

nov3, I didn't even ask anybody for materials. I just mentioned to friends what I was planning to do and in come the offers. I finished the exterior and a guy told me he had plenty of left over shingles in his shed I could have. I was too late for that. Others had windows laying around, etc. Mine is made so I can move it, maybe sell it, when I can build a bigger place.

Great Thread!

BC

From: nov3
20-Sep-07
If I go with a cabin I think I'm inclined to start small and build on gradually as necessary. It's tough to know what you'll eventually want to do. So many decisions. I've gone from thinking totally primitive to a something with well and septic on a slab and now back to something rather simple.

From: Muzzy
21-Sep-07
I say cabin... campers are nice but depreciate. you are going to pay storage unless you can park it next to your house. i would go with something simple like an a-frame. wood burning stove and maybe use a generator for a fridge. I think if its snowing for 4 days you'll be happier sitting next to a wood burning stove then in a camper. If you go with a camper you'll probably end up wanting to put a cement slab to park your trailer on. that will be an additional cost.

Good luck.

From: treecrawler
23-Sep-07
Nov. 3, I went the RV route for 5 years. We bought a brand new pop-up. It was mobile and we used it at a variety of state parks all over. I went out of state with it hunting in the fall. there was the usual maintenence like winterizing it and storage. Cleaning was a frequent thing inside and out. The tow vehicle had its share of maintenence also. There were no property taxes just registration every year. This year we bought a camp with a few acres. and sold the pop-up. Theres more room, its stationary and if it rains well I don't have to put it away and dry it out later. The camp has had many friends and relatives over for the holidays and weekends. The wife loves it (very important) as do the kids. The things we did camping we still do at camp. You can look at it this way too, if you go the cabin route and it does'nt "pan out" you could more than likely get your money back or more, as apposed to the RV.

From: SERBIANSHARK
24-Sep-07

SERBIANSHARK's embedded Photo
SERBIANSHARK's embedded Photo

From: nov3
24-Sep-07
Yeah, something simple like that. Ha!

From: Chuck'M
24-Sep-07
Rednecks! They put their tv satellite dish in the front yard! Everyone knows that's where you put your old sofa and refrigerator...

From: Silverback
09-Oct-18
I faced that decision 7 yrs ago and went with a cabin. I absolutely loved my little 20x26 cabin until my neighbors all around me decided to put up 600 ft wind turbines. Now I wish I went with the small camper. My cabin as of today is now for sale.

From: W
09-Oct-18
I came across an awesome 10x40 cabin built on a trailer frame. Custom deal. Lots of wood, as the builder had a sawmill. We put a porch the length of the front and a carport on the end. If the family ever sells (wife owns land with cousins) it can be moved again. Go with a cabin. You’ll love it. If I went with a camper, I’d get a carport that covered it and was room enough for a porch.

From: midwest
10-Oct-18
11 year old thread!

From: drslyr
10-Oct-18

drslyr's embedded Photo
drslyr's embedded Photo
My cabin in western ny. Hunted out of it for 25 yrs. bought it 5 yrs ago and rehabbed it for a yr every weekend. 5 hrs. away. So happy we bought it.

10-Oct-18
And some say the search function doesn’t work:)

From: grubby
10-Oct-18
I want to know what nov3 ended up doing. I hope the meth heads didn't get him.

From: GotBowAz
10-Oct-18
Nov3 We decided on a 40 foot 5th wheel toy hauler with the last 11 feet being a garage. I use it primarily for a hunting cabin. The garage makes a perfect mud room and a great place to set up your hunting equipment. Im glad we went this route. We have several lakes in off season we like to go to. It has slide outs for lots of room and the best thing I did was add solar panels to the roof keeping two 6 volt deep cell batteries charged/topped off year around. For us it made more sense and it sits on my property at home where I can keep an eye on it or in a secure storage for 35 bucks a month. Heck they have them now with fireplaces in them and more slide outs to add a ton of room. If you dont have electric on your property already then you will need a generator anyway. We have made a ton of memories with the kids and grand kids with it. They bring tents. Its a bit more primitive which IMO is great for the kids.

From: BigOzzie
10-Oct-18
Cabin

But I am sure Nov3 has done something already it would be nice to get his opinion now with hindsight.

oz

From: kadbow
10-Oct-18

kadbow's embedded Photo
kadbow's embedded Photo
Cabin, keep it simple.

From: 12yards
10-Oct-18
I'd go cabin. Been wanting a hunting camp since going to my friends deer shack when I was in high school almost 40 years ago.

From: Jaquomo
10-Oct-18

Jaquomo's embedded Photo
Jaquomo's embedded Photo
I have both. The cabin is great but when we are there, we are there. I can hunt elk out of it and trout fish to my heart's content. But that cabin won't sprout wheels and take me hunting and fishing in WY, AZ, NE, etc. Building the cabin on our lot was my late wife's idea and I don't regret it. But a camper is indispensible for my lifestyle. I probably spend 70 nights a year in it, at least.

From: Schmitty78
10-Oct-18
I personally would go the cabin route. My property is 3 hours from home, and when I first bought it I went the R.V. Route. I went about five years with it. Got tired of driving that big ole thing back and forth, had to pay to store it, tires/oil changes/fuel pumps etc. got expensive. I eventually decided I’d just park it at the property, that was a mistake. I couldn’t keep the stinking mice from chewing their way in, and they pretty well ruined it after a couple of years. So I ended up building a cabin. It’s worth quadruple what I have in it and way easier to take care of! It has been broken into once, so I don’t keep much of value and bought some security cameras but it’s so much nicer than an RV!! The wife and kids also come up with me way more now with the cabin. I was fortunate to have electric and water on the property already, that can be expensive if it needs to be ran. Good luck on deciding! That’s part of the fun of having your own property!

From: r-man
10-Oct-18
3-4 grand for a wooden shed delivered , 3 cots and a bag of KIngsford done.

From: skinnyindian
10-Oct-18

skinnyindian's embedded Photo
skinnyindian's embedded Photo
If I was building a cabin it would have a gambrel roof. This way you add a fair amount of space upstairs for sleeping quarters, etc. I teach high school woodworking and we have built 15 of these sheds over the last 10 years. If my high school students can do it, anyone can! If you need help with plans or designing the roof let me know.

From: PECO
10-Oct-18
Cabin or park an Airstream.

From: bfisherman11
10-Oct-18
I bought my land 18yrs ago. Initially my wife and I bought a very used travel trailer but traded it in after about 4 years on a park model (also used). Now we are getting ready to retire and will build a home on our land. a new neighbor bought land across the road and is interested in my park model. sounds good to me. Ha, saves me worrying on how to sell it otherwise.

Park models are tax free and like a cabin, we will use the electric and water runs that we installed 15 years ago for the new house. The holding tank we put in was of the type that could be converted to a septic system. So we had a plan and I guess it played out.

All fun and sometimes it works out. Bill

From: zeke
10-Oct-18

zeke's embedded Photo
For me a cabin
zeke's embedded Photo
For me a cabin

From: cord 62
10-Oct-18

From: cord 62
10-Oct-18
old news

From: jrb(CO)
11-Oct-18
Put a 5th wheel on my CO ranch. I did dig a small septic field, and with a generator it has all the comforts of home. Would love a small cabin, but there were significant property tax changes if I erected a permanent structure. Not sure if that is as big an issue elsewhere in the country.

From: South Farm
11-Oct-18
"11 year old thread!"

"old news"

And yet here you guys are;) C'mon, does talking cabins EVER get old?!?

Silverback...I know the feeling, only in my case it was a couple of gun nuts shooting dark to dark every weekend. Couldn't sell fast enough, and now I'm searching for a new spot to try again because cabin life is the best life!

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