DeerBuilder.com
hind quarter shot
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
mzeemike 17-Dec-07
Matt 17-Dec-07
rooster 17-Dec-07
travis@work 17-Dec-07
Shuteye 17-Dec-07
Gampaw 17-Dec-07
LH 17-Dec-07
Blacktail Bob 17-Dec-07
TurkeyHntnFool 17-Dec-07
JTV 17-Dec-07
Ki-Ke 17-Dec-07
mzeemike 17-Dec-07
Jax07 17-Dec-07
Bou'bound 17-Dec-07
Dave B 17-Dec-07
semostickbow 17-Dec-07
CPAhunter 17-Dec-07
travis@work 18-Dec-07
writer 18-Dec-07
travis@work 18-Dec-07
12yards 18-Dec-07
Deerman1 18-Dec-07
travis@work 18-Dec-07
Deerman1 18-Dec-07
sipe 18-Dec-07
travis@work 18-Dec-07
Deerman1 18-Dec-07
hmaxims 18-Dec-07
SILVERADO 19-Dec-07
mzeemike 19-Dec-07
Dan 19-Dec-07
fuzzy 19-Dec-07
nijimasu 19-Dec-07
Slider, 19-Dec-07
writer 19-Dec-07
WW 19-Dec-07
Doug S 19-Dec-07
writer 19-Dec-07
Grant Williamson 19-Dec-07
WW 20-Dec-07
Ihunts2much 20-Dec-07
writer 20-Dec-07
mzeemike 21-Dec-07
WW 21-Dec-07
Dan 21-Dec-07
LH 21-Dec-07
wifishkiller 21-Dec-07
Ihunts2much 21-Dec-07
Ihunts2much 21-Dec-07
Dan 21-Dec-07
WW 22-Dec-07
WW 22-Dec-07
WW 22-Dec-07
Genesis 22-Dec-07
Ihunts2much 22-Dec-07
WW 22-Dec-07
Stackinthewild 19-Nov-19
GF 19-Nov-19
Stackinthewild 19-Nov-19
IdyllwildArcher 19-Nov-19
Stackinthewild 19-Nov-19
Huntcell 19-Nov-19
Duke 19-Nov-19
Glunker 19-Nov-19
Trial153 20-Nov-19
Bou'bound 20-Nov-19
relliK reeD 20-Nov-19
From: mzeemike
17-Dec-07
This morning, one of those things that can go wrong in archery did. I had a buck come in to 18 yards. He turned broadside and as he turned for a bite, I drew and let fly. My string must have caught a snap on my outermost layer of clothing, and I was horrified to see the arrow miss its mark, and stick right into the hind quarter.

As he ran away, I could see the arrow protruding from both sides. Needless to say, I was very disappointed. I got down and there is blood at the scene...typical color for a meat hit and a decent trail...WHICH I DID NOT TAKE UP YET.

Its been 6 hours and I'm thinking about heading out to look. Unless I hit the femoral artery, by hopes are slim. There is a foot of snow on the ground which will help a great deal.

Any suggestions, ideas, or others with experience with t his situation?

From: Matt
17-Dec-07
With a foot of snow, you should get him. Just be persistent.

From: rooster
17-Dec-07

From: travis@work
17-Dec-07
Take the trail up by yourself and be ready to put another arrow in him...Not to discourage you but I had this same deal happen several years ago...no snow tho which will help in your case...the buck I trailed crossed the river three times on me..zig zaging his way up stream..I never found the buck...if ya hit any major artery he won`t be far from where ya shot him..good luck..stay after him

From: Shuteye
17-Dec-07
I've seen a couple hit in the hind quarters and they were recovered pretty quickly.

From: Gampaw
17-Dec-07
If you haven't taken the trail yet, I'd suggest maybe getting a buddy to go with you. If you can determine the deer's general direction of travel your friend might make a BIG circle to try to get several hundred yards ahead of the deer in case you push him once you take up the trail.

From: LH
17-Dec-07
You should have started to trail immediately so he did not have time to "close up". Not like a body cavity hit. Push him hard and keep him bleeding. Thankfully you have snow or you would have a hard time doing it. Let us know how you did.

Good luck.

17-Dec-07
If you hit him in the hindquarter, I bet he'll be dead within 100 yards. My experience is that an arrow in the hindquarter results in death faster than most, not all, liver shots. You don't have to hit the femoral either.

17-Dec-07
if you hit the femoral game over for him, but what i would do is just nock an arrow and track him as if you were trying to hunt him. you should have a dead deer

From: JTV
17-Dec-07
Yep, no one WANTS this type of hit but it happens. I would say a hit of this type is one to get onto right away so you can keep it open and continue it's bleeding. With the snow on, hopefully you will be able to stay on it.....Jeff

From: Ki-Ke
17-Dec-07
I'm with LH above. Get on him and stay on him. Hard.

From: mzeemike
17-Dec-07
Well, when you make a shot like that, you're torn between going after him right away, or not. In this case, I should have gone after him right away.

I followed the trail 10 yards and found my arrow intact. It must have pulled right through. The trail was easy to see in the snow, but not much volume. Several hundred yards into it I found where he had stood still and let it drip for a while. I kept on, and even after an hour of steady walking, I could see where he was still jumping over brush, etc. It had been this morning I think, the small blood drops on the snow were frozen balls. I kept going until I was following nothing more than tiny flecks dusted on top of the snow. Then even the spots ended about 2 hours into it. Without snow, I would have lost him in the first 50 yards.

I think he'll be fine...not so much for me- It's draining to make a bad shot and have it end this way. I'll see him next year I hope, or maybe again this year if he's really unlucky.

From: Jax07
17-Dec-07
I did this in Sept. I got lucky and hit the artery....she went about 150 yards and piles uped...blood was on and off......

if you hit the artery he is done

From: Bou'bound
17-Dec-07
I thought you may have been in trouble when you said you saw the arrow on both sides. You would have been fortunate to have the arrow/ broadhead remain in the muscle to do more damage and maybe work into the artery as he ran off...kind of like a propeller. with the broadhead safely outside the body ........unless you killed him in short order with a femoral shot ........you will not likley kill one.

From: Dave B
17-Dec-07
Depends you were toward the front or back of the quarter and how high/low the hit was. Towards the back he may live, towards the front you probably got guts/intestines and he won't survive that hit. Higher the hit the less likely he is to live IMO.

From: semostickbow
17-Dec-07
My thoughts are with you, I did the exact same thing on a giant 6x6 on 11/3, never found him. Marginal, bright red blood for 100yds and it stopped. I looked for 2 days with a dog. Everyone I talked to thought he made it.

I will look again after season, though.

From: CPAhunter
17-Dec-07
You have time, keep hunting him this year.....he may wander past you again. Good Luck!

From: travis@work
18-Dec-07
Even if you would have went right after him you wouldn`t have got him..if anything you would have pushed him further..sorry but if it was a superficial hit meaning no arteries were cut your efforts of pushing him wouldn`t have made him bleed anymore than he did..There are very few times when it`s good to push a marginal hit but there are times to do it..I think ya made the right call as for one you said he never laid down..so he stayed on his feet anyhow...most of the main arteries run on the inside of the leg protected by bone..sounds like ya put in alot of effort looking for him..kudos to you...

From: writer
18-Dec-07
There's more to the hind quarter than the femoral. The deer that went 150 yards wasn't hit in the femoral or it wouldn't have one 1/3 that distance.

I hit one in the ham long ago -- I flinched, no blame on clothing or a moving deer -- and put it through both sides. It went about 180 yards and was down on its own.

We were ready to keep pushing it if needed to keep the wound open.

From: travis@work
18-Dec-07
Keeping the wound open on a superficial hit will get ya nowhere..when ya hit ANY artery it will be quite apparent really quick on the blood trail--or ya see the deer go down..if that doesn`t happen I would back out as he did..that is unless ya just enjoy walking 3 or 4 miles to find nothing but a few specks of blood..the few times I have pushed deer are on liver shots after waiting a couple hours before i start pushing..quite frankly I don`t feel you should ever push a deer until ya wait at least 2 hours..dbl lung shots are different..but any iffy shot should be sat out...when you push a deer on a gut or liver shot you`ll will alot of times make the hole become clogged with fat or guts..then no blood....plus the skin on an animal can slide 2 or 3 inches in either direction when he`s moving or stretching his skin..Just my opinion on the deal---push`n a muscle hit will get you nowhere real quick...as in this case he gained or lost nothing by backing out..better to be safe than sorry

From: 12yards
18-Dec-07
Yeah, I hit one there unintentionally back in 1998. The arrow went in, snapped the femur, and cut the artery (luckily). Honest to God it was the easiest most obvious blood trail I've ever seen. It was a foot wide and constant. He didn't go 100 yards before he went down. I was lucky. I think your deer will survive if you only hit leg. In the body cavity and he'll die.

From: Deerman1
18-Dec-07
You guys dont have to hit the artery on a ham shot to kill the deer in quick order.

The back hips/hams on a deer are such huge muscles there is a lot of blood flowing to them. You center-punch one right in the back ham, and you will most likely find that deer very dead after a short distance.

I have accidentally hit a few there over the years due to deflections and screw ups on my part. There are a lot of worse places to hit one than here.

Definitely not a shot to try for, but not the end of the world if this is where you end up hitting

From: travis@work
18-Dec-07
"You guys dont have to hit the artery on a ham shot to kill the deer in quick order."

I disagree...i`ve boned out enough deer to know that there are several arteries running around the ham and if you don`t hit one your shot is superficial..no different than shooting through the backstraps..meat hits will not kill a deer unless you get a vessel or artery....or long term infection

From: Deerman1
18-Dec-07
"I disagree...i`ve boned out enough deer to know that there are several arteries running around the ham and if you don`t hit one your shot is superficial..no different than shooting through the backstraps..meat hits will not kill a deer unless you get a vessel or artery....or long term infection"

Trav,

I agree with what you said above. Never push one hit here. Give them a few hours to lose enough blood to make them weak, then take up the trail very slowly, and be ready for another shot.

with todays powerful equipment, and large sharp BH's, how likely is it to not get a artery or vessel, these areas are full of em'. I'm not advocating this shot, but it is deadlier than most realize. I've been on probably 20 different bloodtrals that the deer were hit here, and they all have ended under 500 yards with the deer being recovered. A few required another shot, but the deer were too weak to get up or go any further.

No matter what, you hit one here, and you'll be glad you have a big ole' nasty BH on the end of your arrow. You'll have your work cut out for you too. These deer will do everything they can to lose you.

From: sipe
18-Dec-07
I made an errant shot on a doe in October and she was down within 70 yds. Go get your deer.

From: travis@work
18-Dec-07
Sipe--he already looked and couldn`t find it..

deerman--guess it just matters on each situation on what to do...and I know you weren`t saying this is a good shot..i was just saying if it`s clearly a meat shot only that ya probably won`t find the deer...like what happened to me on one of my post above...

From: Deerman1
18-Dec-07
Agreed,

Meat only.....good luck, you'll need it!

From: hmaxims
18-Dec-07
Read all the comments and all have good made good points.

I shot a doe with my smokepole this year and shot her in the left rear hind quarter. Not proud of it all and I have no idea what happened. This was the first deer I had ever shot that didn't die with a single shot.

I trailed her for probably 1/2 mile through the woods jumping her 5-6 times. Luckily, I pushed her hard and she was laying down and too weak to get up and I got off another kill shot. I would hate to have to do a stalk with a bow though. It was nerve wracking enough with a gun.

Howie

From: SILVERADO
19-Dec-07
well.. Any luck finding the buck?

From: mzeemike
19-Dec-07
Went back the next day to where the blood ended (2 hour walk). I know of some water holes in the area, so I checked them...nothing. Most of the water is frozen over now. I didn't see any birds that would indicate a carcass, so I am going to operate under the assumption that he is fine. I will still be out bow hunting until Jan. 1st. here in Michigan, so maybe our paths will cross again.

From: Dan
19-Dec-07
Though it looks like it is done. . . I have a thought that sounds contrary to some you (and I know that these are judgement calls). I would have tracked the deer immediately. One key piece to the puzzle was the snow. If it was an artery the deer was down. If it was not, the only hope was to keep the wound bleeding. The only way you keep it bleeding is to push him- other wise he lays down, comes out of shock, while the wound clots. You had nothing to lose with that hit. Both hams certainly means he is going to go into shock and going to get worse if you push him hard. You got snow-an easy track job. If there were guts involved I would wait 8-12 hours.

My 2C Dan

From: fuzzy
19-Dec-07
I'm with Dan on this one. Too late now of course. I never leave a followable blood trail. May wait hours, but never leave.

From: nijimasu
19-Dec-07

nijimasu's embedded Photo
nijimasu's embedded Photo
I agree with trailing right away. I operate under the belief that a arterial hit may close over if a deer is allowed to bed. This hit was not optimal; I have no excuse-it could have been an equipment malfunction or hitting my sleeve or whatever, but in the end, I missed the breadbaket and ended up poking the deer in the hind quarters. I took up the trail 30 minutes after the shot and sneaked along with my son as quietly as I could- the theory being I could keep the medium blood trail going if I didn't let the deer bed for long. I found the deer after about a half hour- she went only about 130 yards and was tucked under some brush- I had severed a major artery in one leg and a minor one in the other. I believe the deer ran full bore for the 130 yards, felt woozy and either crawled under the bush or crashed under it. The trail was only mediocre where she was traveling, but she was laying in a reasonably sized pool where she went down.

I'm reading this thrad with great interest, because I want to know other's experiences with this scenario. My actions turned out OK in this instance- but I want to know how others' experiences have turned out as well, in case, heaven forbid, make a similar hit again someday. Please keep the responses coming.

From: Slider,
19-Dec-07
A couple years ago I shot at a Nice 4x4 Mulie in a foot of snow.I hit a limb and the arrow went through the rear ham front to rear with the same amount of arrow showing on either side!!! He was bleeding really well. I followed that deer for 6 hour's. He took me into the steep stuff. I decided to let him lay down.(That was a mistake!!!)He laid down pulled out the arrow and STOPPED BLEEDING and when I snuck up to him to put another arrow in him he bounced off like nothing ever happened to him!!! Good Luck

From: writer
19-Dec-07
The best blood trailers I've been with -- Brad Harris, Bob Foulkrod -- have all recovered leg/muscle hit deer when I've been around because they kept pushing them and kept the wound open.

In Canada Harris trailed one for almost a day-and-a-half that was hit in the front leg.

From: WW
19-Dec-07
Push him...

From an article I wrote several years ao..

A hip-shot deer. A large artery (femoral) runs down the inside of each deer leg. This artery is protected from the side by the leg bones. The femoral artery is most often severed from the rear or at an angle. If this artery is cut, the bleeding will be profuse and the deer will usually be found in less than 100 yards. The ham of a deer is also rich in veins with a lot of blood. A hip-shot deer should be tracked immediately. Track him slowly and quietly to keep him moving (walking). If you jump him and he runs, back off for a few minutes then continue trailing. You want him to walk, not run. A walking deer is easier to trail.

From: Doug S
19-Dec-07
FYI I shot a mulie through both hams (arrow sticking out both sides as he left). It was open country so I could see him for almost a half of a mile. He went into some tall sage and then I blood trailed him to a rock out crop. He bedded and I got a 20 yard shot as he fled and knicked his front leg. Trailed him for 400 yards to a rise and left. Next morning from that rise I glassed the opposite hill's brushy areas until I saw a coyote watching me from about 300 yards away. I figured something was up when he didn't run. To his left was my buck bedded and still alive. I sat and watched till 11:00 when I thought by his weaving I could get a another shot on him. Which I did. Don't know what I hit but he went a long way. I don't think I hit the femorals. BTW the coyote would walk over and look at him now and then in between his naps. i used a wide 2 blade head.

From: writer
19-Dec-07
You never have to wonder if you hit the femoral...you know right away.

19-Dec-07
In 2005 i shot a doe right in the but. She was perfectly broadside and only 20 yards away. I diddnt believe what i saw so i got down right away and went to my arrow. It mas soaked in blood like a heart shot so for a minute i thought my eyes had played tricks on me so i followed th best blood trail i have ever seen 60 yards to find it. I have trailed well over 50 deer and it was unreal. Hit the femoral thank god.

From: WW
20-Dec-07
About the only thing that will bleed better than the femorals is the kidneys.

From: Ihunts2much
20-Dec-07
I have hit a couple deer in the hind quarters. they were both quartering away. I treated them as a gut shot(6hr wait) and both were easily recovered. I figure if the hit is fatal, the deer will be dead or signifigantly weakened after that time. If I have caused a superficial wound and my only hope for killing that deer is to harass it to death, I would rather let it heal. I have seen plenty lost from pushing. I have yet too see one be any less dead because you waited too long. Seems strange an arrow through both hams did not produce more blood. Was the weather very cold and the snow fresh. I have seen where warm blood will cut through the snow under those conditions and will be hard to see.

From: writer
20-Dec-07
Ditto WW on the kidney shot...wow.

It'll turn a terrible-looking hit into a great day in five or six seconds. You're danged lucky to hit it, though.

From: mzeemike
21-Dec-07
I think I wrote in the first post that the arrow only went into 1 leg, not both hams. As he ran away, I could see the arrow sticking through both sides of the right, back leg about 3/4 of the way up.

From: WW
21-Dec-07
" Ditto WW on the kidney shot...wow.

It'll turn a terrible-looking hit into a great day in five or six seconds. You're danged lucky to hit it, though."

Just like a ham shot. Not one that I would deliberately shoot for.

"If I have caused a superficial wound and my only hope for killing that deer is to harass it to death, I would rather let it heal."

A hip shot is not "superficial". If I have an arrow in a deer I will trail it until I cant trail it anymore and then I would grid search for it.I don't call that "harrassing", just good sportsmanship.

YMMV...

From: Dan
21-Dec-07
Mike- did not realize that- I re-read the post, it was a little ambiguous. One ham could definitely make a difference, but I would have still got on him. Just my opinion though. . . you did what you thought best. We all have those types of decisions and they work out in various results. Good try. . . go get another one. One way or the other you are accomplishing what we are there for, game management through taking out animals.

Dan

From: LH
21-Dec-07
Mike, better that you hit only one ham since you didn't find it. I agree with Dan about the confusion. I thought you meant both when you said what you did about it sticking out both sides.

From: wifishkiller
21-Dec-07
I've seen 4 deer shot in the hind 1/4 and all were found. One was shot a second time the others were stone cold dead, everyone was bedded withing 100yards (didnt jump them we always wait if the shots in ?)

From: Ihunts2much
21-Dec-07
ww-I think the only guy talking about a hip shot is you. I read this thread as pertaining to a rear leg/ham hit. By the way I would also treat a hip shot as a gut shot. I see no benefit to pushing an arrowed deer and just because sometimes it produces a dead deer is not proof positive it is the best course of action. If in doubt I wait. It has not failed me yet. I would rather find a cool stiff deer and say I didn't need to wait so long than jump one that I know is mortally wounded and never see it again. Now what does YMMV stand for?

From: Ihunts2much
21-Dec-07
Mzeemike- When you said you saw the arrow sticking out both sides I envisioned both sides of the animal. If you pierced one leg and the blood dried up very likely a wound he will recover from. It makes more sense to me now. I strongly feel that if your hit was fatal you would have found him dead or severely weakened after a 6 hour wait. You did the right thing in my opinion, better luck next time.

From: Dan
21-Dec-07
hunts2much- there was snow- you are never going to lose the track.

From: WW
22-Dec-07
Hip or ham is the same to me. Isn't it for everybody?

I've been on over 300 documented blood trailing jobs with my good friend John Trout Jr. who wrote a couple books on the subject and we will always push any animal that is muscle hit only. And it is more times than naught that it "sometimes it produces a dead deer."

I agree with your statement of waiting on "mortally wounded" deer except in the instances of a muscle hit.Then I'll push slowly and quietly.

YMMV - is Your Mileage May Vary. IOW - to each his own. It is your deer, trail it any which way that you want.

Me? I'll push a hip/ham shot deer immediately. All other hits deserves a wait. Depending on where the animal is hit determines the length of the wait.

From: WW
22-Dec-07
I wrote this magazine article a bunch of years back. I've updated it several times since.

TRACKING WOUNDED DEER

Less than a minute has elapsed since you've shot one of the biggest bucks you have ever seen. It happened so fast it's hard to believe. What you do now may determine whether or not you'll recover your buck.

Your first impulse is to bail out of your treestand and take off after him. Depending upon your arrow placement, this could be a big mistake. If a deer is not hit well you could spook him and make recovery next to impossible.

Knowing where the animal is hit makes a difference in how you track him. For this reason, a bowhunter should use brightly colored fletching, such as orange, white, yellow or red.

The chest of the deer contains the lungs and the heart which, when hit, produce the quickest kill. The lungs are easily reached by an arrow, protected only by vulnerable rib bones. The heart is low in the body and somewhat protected by the deer's leg bone.

The following describes types of hits and how you should track for each.

* A lung-shot deer will run hard 50 to 65 yards. After that he will usually walk until he falls. The blood will sometimes have tiny bubbles in it. This blood trail usually gets better as you track the deer. However, if the deer is hit high in the lungs, the blood trail may sometimes become light and even disappear completely. The deer could be "filling up" inside with blood, showing very little external bleeding. The hair from the lung area is coarse and brown with black tips. The deer will usually go down in less than 125 yards. Give the deer 30 minutes before tracking.

* A heart-shot deer will sometimes jump wildly when hit. The blood trail may be sparse for the first 20 yards or so. A heart shot deer may track as much as a quarter of a mile, depending on what part of the heart is damaged. The usual is less than 125 yards. The hair from this shot will be long brown or grayish guard hairs. Again, a 30 minute wait is advised. But, if while trailing you find where he has bedded back off and wait an hour before taking up the trail again.

* A liver-shot deer. The liver lies against the diaphragm in the approximate center of the deer. It is a definite killing shot. The blood trail will be decent to follow and the deer should bed down and die within 200 yards, if not pushed. A one-hour wait is best. The hair from the liver area is brownish gray and much shorter than the hair from the lung area. If you push the deer out of his bed, back off and wait another hour.

* A gut-shot deer is probably the most difficult to recover because of the poor blood trail and the hunter's impatience to wait him out. A lot of bowhunters want to hurry up and find the deer. Since the liver and stomach are close together, it is possible that the deer will go down and die quickly if the shot also penetrates the liver. If the deer is dead in an hour, he will still be dead in 4 hours. Have patience, he will not go anywhere. Wait him out for at least 4 hours. Wait overnight if the deer is shot in the evening.

When a deer is shot in the stomach area, he will usually take several short jumps and commence walking or running. His back will usually hunch up and his legs will be spread wide. The hair from this wound is brownish gray and short. The lower the shot is on the animal, the lighter colored the hair will be. The blood trail is usually poor with small pieces of ingested material (stomach contents). If the intestines are punctured there will be green slimy material or feces Take your bow with you because a second shot might be required.

* A spine-shot deer will usually drop in his tracks or hobble off. Either way, a second shot will probably be required to finish off the deer. If a spine-shot deer hobbles off, wait a half-hour and track slowly and quietly. Look for the deer bedded down.

* A neck-shot deer will either die in 100 yards or he will recover from the wound. The lower portion of the neck contains the windpipe, neck bone (spine), and carotid (jugular) arteries. If the arteries are hit, the deer will run hard and drop in less than 100 yards. The blood trail will be easy to follow. A shot above the neck bone will give you a good blood trail for about 150 to 200 yards before quitting. The deer will more than likely recover to be hunted again.

* A hip-shot deer. A large artery (femoral) runs down the inside of each deer leg. This artery is protected from the side by the leg bones. The femoral artery is most often severed from the rear or at an angle. If this artery is cut, the bleeding will be profuse and the deer will usually be found in less than 100 yards. The ham of a deer is also rich in veins with a lot of blood. A hip-shot deer should be tracked immediately. Track him slowly and quietly to keep him moving (walking). If you jump him and he runs, back off for a few minutes then continue trailing. You want him to walk, not run. A walking deer is easier to trail.

* An artery-shot deer will almost always go down in less than 100 yards. The aortic artery runs just under the backbone from heart to hips, where it branches to become the femoral arteries. The heart also pumps blood to the brain through the carotid (jugular) arteries.

Sever any of these arteries and you've got yourself a deer. There is one catch, these arteries are tough. It takes a sharp broadhead to cut through them. A dull broadhead will just push them aside. Keep your broadheads sharp! Give the deer half an hour before tracking. GENERAL TRACKING TIPS

* After shooting the deer, stay in your stand and be quiet for the recommended time. A noise might push your deer away. He could be bedded down less than 100 yards away.

* I have found it very helpful to tie a piece of pink surveyor ribbon around my stand tree at eye level from where I shot. After noting several terrain features near where the deer was standing and where it ran too, I tie on the ribbon before coming down. From the ground looking back up to the ribbon, I can get a better visual for locating exactly where the deer was and went.

* Before beginning the tracking, mark where you shot the deer with a piece of white toilet paper hung on a branch.

* Mark the trail periodically with more toilet paper as you track. This will give you a line on the deer's travel.

* When you find the arrow, check for hair, tallow, blood, etc. This will give you a good clue on how to track. Example: Tallow and slime means you should wait 4 hours.

* Check for blood carefully, walking off to the side of the run.

* Look for blood on trees, saplings, and leaves that are about the same height as the wound. Blood will sometimes rub off the body.

* If tracking as a group, spread out a little. Keep noise to a minimum. In tracking, sometimes "too many cooks can spoil the stew." It would be better if only 2 or 3 people tracked the deer. If the blood trail runs out, you can always get more help to search for the deer

* While tracking a deer that you have shot and you jump a deer and it flags its tail, it's probably not your deer. A wounded deer will very seldom "flag." BUT - check it out anyway.

* Gut-shot deer have a habit of going to water. If you lose a gut-shot deer's trail, check out the water holes in the area. He could be down by one.

* Tracking at night presents special problems with visibility. The blood and the deer will both be hard to see. A Coleman gas lantern will help a lot in both cases. If the deer is not hit well, and no rain is forecast, wait until morning. If he is dead in 10 minutes or 4 hours, he will still be dead in the morning.

* Take a compass bearing to where you last saw the deer, and another one to where you last heard any noise from it's flight. It might prove very helpful.

* It helps to have someone who did not shoot the deer to help with the blood trial. Many an experienced hunter in his excitement misses things.

* Stay off of the blood trail, and use a small piece of tolled paper to mark each spot

* Get down on your hands and knees when a blood trail is hard to see it helps. From this angle while night tracking you can shine the light in the direction of travel and often see blood that does not show when standing over it.

* Look at the bottom of leaves on branches at deer body height. Sometimes as the branch slides along the body of a deer it is the under side of the leaf that picks up the blood.

* You will often find a gut shot deer or liver shot deer dead in the water not just beside it. so look for an ear or the side of the deer in deeper water too.

* Some shots that look good may be one lung or a poor liver hit because of the angle. These deer can take several hours to die. Be careful about pushing them to soon, since they will rarely leave much blood sign if they are jumped when bedded.

* Look ahead as you blood trail for deer parts and movement. Your deer may still be alive and you might be able to get a second shot or back off with out spooking it.

* Look for disturbed leaves and broken twigs as well as for the blood sign on hard to follow blood trails.

* It is often hard to follow a blood trail in grass. It seems that the blood can fall all the way to the ground without hitting a single blade of grass.

* Look for clusters of ants, flies and daddy longlegs. You can find small drops of blood because these bugs are feeding on it.

* Often times when the blood trail seems to end you will find the animal off to one side and not in the same direction of travel.

* Listen for birds like magpies, jays, and crows. Sometimes they make a ruckus where the animal lies dead.

* Be persistent!

* A dog can often prove very useful if legal. Even your house pet. They can see with their nose what we can not see with our eyes.

* Use your nose. sometimes you can smell a deer you can't see. A gut shot is even more likely to have a smell.

* When trailing at night use a couple of the Chem Lights that you can get at WalMart for less than a buck. You don't use these as lights to see blood, but they are hung on limbs at the last blood found. That way nobody has to stand on the last blood and everyone can easily see where the last blood found is at

Did I say be persistent!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v474/Woowoo1/deeranatomyanimation-1.gif

From: WW
22-Dec-07

WW's Link
Deer anatomy picture...

From: Genesis
22-Dec-07
Hind quarter shots are deadly...even without hitting the femoral artery.Deer do not like to move either,they usually will not go far.

The problem,I have with pushing a hind quarter shot is often times the gut is taken with it.So that deer is "dead man walking" and just needs time.

For that reason alone quarter away hind quarter hits I give 12 hours.On broadside anterior placement on hind quarter I give 12 hours and only push a posterior hind quarter.

That said,if in doubt treat it like a gutshot and give 12 hours

From: Ihunts2much
22-Dec-07
my bad to disagree with an "outdoors writer". This is designated a debate free thread so I guess I will just thank you ww for the recap of bowhunters ed and live with a different definition of "sportsmanship" than you.

From: WW
22-Dec-07
Genesis,

I agree.

One has to take in consideration all vitals that are impacted or could have been impacted when making their choice to trail or wait.

In the case of a broadside hit (like this one)chances are it is just the hip/ham impacted. I push them.

19-Nov-19

Stackinthewild's embedded Photo
Stackinthewild's embedded Photo
Hey All,

First, let me thank everyone bc if this forum I. Keep looking and found my quartering away rear end hit deer tonight . After some of the responses I decided not to wait and push the deer . No need to . Deer was dead within 200 yards on a dead trial that he came in on . Thank you so much for the help and tips on here helps more than people think !

From: GF
19-Nov-19
Damn! And it only took 12 years and a new handle....

19-Nov-19
Hahah dif guy . I woulda loved to see a 12 year old buck in south New Jersey .

19-Nov-19
Reverse Hamblaster. Glad you recovered your deer.

19-Nov-19
Hahah dif guy . I woulda loved to see a 12 year old buck in south New Jersey .

From: Huntcell
19-Nov-19
As TBM would say “must a hit the fedora atrii”

From: Duke
19-Nov-19
Inverted ham blaster! There’s a little TBM in all of us. :)

From: Glunker
19-Nov-19
Surprised at the variety of suggestions. A hind quarter hit has been an hit to follow up asap for the last 50 years unless I missed something. If it is not going to kill the deer it will not kill the deer. The reason to follow up is to keep it bleeding until you can make that decision. One more post about leaving a deer overnight might m as kg e me go postal. Trail them and save the meat. If you cannot trail a deer at night maybe gun hunting is your niche.

From: Trial153
20-Nov-19
Wasnt it chuck Adams in his orginal bowhunters digest that advocated for ham shots?

From: Bou'bound
20-Nov-19
Glunker -

Ham shot aside it sounds like you are suggesting all shots should be immediately trailed vs. letting die and lay overnight (which may risk meat or carcass). In many cases that will simply push a deer into an unrecoverable place where it may still die but not be found. Some shots simply take time and if they are pushed the risk is greater than the benefit. Liver, single lung, gut, etc. are all fatal and findable if you don't push the thing into the next state by chasing it prematurely.

From: relliK reeD
20-Nov-19
Not to steal the thread but same thing happened to me on October 12th this year. 35 yd quartering away shot and the deer turned at the last moment with half my arrow sticking out of his rectum. Reality hit when it started raining and all the leaves on the ground were red. The deer crossed a small swale grass swamp three times as I tracked him seeing him each time from about 75 yds and arrow still in him. Finally watched him bed and decided to give it a few hours. Half hour goes by and he stands up at 50 yds and I double lunged him. Lucky to get that one. Every situation is different depending on shot placement, time, yotes or other critters, weather conditions and time of day. There is no one answer fits all as to when or when not to track.

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