Summit Treestands
Does anyone use a hammock elk hunting
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
elkhunter71 31-Jul-13
BoonROTO 31-Jul-13
smarba 31-Jul-13
elkmtngear 31-Jul-13
bb 31-Jul-13
kadbow 31-Jul-13
desert_nick 31-Jul-13
Norseman 31-Jul-13
Glunt@work 31-Jul-13
MarksExtra 31-Jul-13
JT_Trad 01-Aug-13
Cheesehead Mike 01-Aug-13
ohiohunter 01-Aug-13
IdyllwildArcher 01-Aug-13
MC 01-Aug-13
elkhunter71 01-Aug-13
Norseman 01-Aug-13
BowMad23 01-Aug-13
olebuck 01-Aug-13
BULELK1 01-Aug-13
MC 01-Aug-13
chasinbugles 01-Aug-13
Norseman 01-Aug-13
Norseman 01-Aug-13
shedhead 02-Aug-13
ki-ke out 02-Aug-13
MC 02-Aug-13
ohiohunter 02-Aug-13
llamapacker 02-Aug-13
bb 02-Aug-13
MC 05-Aug-13
bad karma 06-Aug-13
Stryker 08-Aug-13
Norseman 08-Aug-13
MountainManiac 08-Aug-13
bpctcb 10-Aug-13
RockChucker30 12-Aug-13
Cheesehead Mike 12-Aug-13
elkhunter71 12-Aug-13
jbone 12-Aug-13
RockChucker30 12-Aug-13
RockChucker30 12-Aug-13
RockChucker30 12-Aug-13
MC 12-Aug-13
Gaur 12-Aug-13
westaner 13-Aug-13
westaner 13-Aug-13
RockChucker30 13-Aug-13
elkhunter71 14-Aug-13
AmericanBwana 14-Aug-13
Bowhunner 14-Aug-13
snapcrackpop 14-Aug-13
flybyjohn 15-Aug-13
Cheesehead Mike 15-Aug-13
Cheesehead Mike 15-Aug-13
MC 15-Aug-13
Beendare 15-Aug-13
RockChucker30 16-Aug-13
wrkhrdwrksmrt 16-Aug-13
MC 16-Aug-13
jbone 16-Aug-13
Rut Nut 16-Aug-13
JokerTZ 13-Jun-21
WV Mountaineer 13-Jun-21
jordanathome 13-Jun-21
Grunt-N-Gobble 13-Jun-21
WV Mountaineer 13-Jun-21
arnold44 14-Jun-21
Grey Ghost 14-Jun-21
orange feather 07-Jul-21
Mule Power 07-Jul-21
jordanathome 07-Jul-21
Jaquomo 07-Jul-21
PushCoArcher 07-Jul-21
hobbes 08-Jul-21
Jaquomo 08-Jul-21
WV Mountaineer 08-Jul-21
jordanathome 08-Jul-21
Jaquomo 08-Jul-21
jordanathome 08-Jul-21
SandTrapArcher 16-Jul-21
SandTrapArcher 16-Jul-21
SandTrapArcher 16-Jul-21
SandTrapArcher 16-Jul-21
From: elkhunter71
31-Jul-13
Does anyone here use a hmmock on there bivy hunts? If so pros and cons.

From: BoonROTO
31-Jul-13
Thinking of trying an Eno myself this season.

From: smarba
31-Jul-13
My partner just got one and swears it will be the ticket.

He had a spare, so we used them on a bivy scout.

Maybe it was fluke, but I slept terrible and had sore neck/back.

He slept great and is going to use it on our upcoming elk hunt.

I'm an engineer, so tend to weigh pros/cons and become very particular.

IMO pros include: light weight; no need for flat ground; mice & little critters no concern.

Cons: Need appropriately spaced trees; very tough to change clothes inside; I could not lie flat & sides wrapped me like a cocoon which I did not like.

Based on one night only, I personally am not ready to switch from bivy tent.

Carl

From: elkmtngear
31-Jul-13

elkmtngear's Link
My hunting partner will be using one as well this Season...at least one of us will be free to run off the bear when he is using Kenny as a pinyata ;)

Best of Luck, Jeff (Bowsite Sponsor)

From: bb
31-Jul-13
One other con...you will freeze if it's cold. unless you can figure out a way to get some foam under your sleeping bag and even that may not do it.

From: kadbow
31-Jul-13
If your hunt turns cold and wet it sounds miserable.

From: desert_nick
31-Jul-13
I will only use a hammock these days, did plenty of nights on the ground from boy scouts on up.

Rain? Buy the rain fly, set it up taut. Bring a plastic tarp to put underneath your hammock, fold it over during rain or night, keeps your stuff clean and dry.

Cold? I use a therma-rest in my hammock, keeps me insulated and keeps me from sliding down. If that's not enough, there are companies that make thermal 'blankets' that go around the hammock.

Trees are oddly spaced? I use the Eno's Pro-Straps, have yet to find a place I could use it.

I used to think hammocks were for the hippies, slept in one and I'm a convert.

From: Norseman
31-Jul-13
This topic has been discusses ad nauseam here on the elk forum. Do a search and you will find many threads covering the pros but mostly cons

From: Glunt@work
31-Jul-13
I tried it once. Wasn't comfortable for me but tolerable. It was cold.

From: MarksExtra
31-Jul-13
I slept great in one on my last elk hunt.

Weight: apples to apples, the hammock comes in heavier since a tarp and an underquilt is a necessity to keep you warm.

Comfort goes to the hammock for most people.

I like the idea. I like the sleep I get. I just don't care for the hassle.

From: JT_Trad
01-Aug-13
Eno on my summer backback trip but not tries during elk hunting. I use the new pad by Klymit (Static-v) it is really a good sleep.

01-Aug-13

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Here we go again...

I tried a Hennesey Hammock in Idaho and named it the Hennesey freezer bag. By the time you pack enough stuff to keep you warm you might as well pack a tent, especially when you can get a good tent that weighs close to 2 pounds.

And then there's the hassle of getting dressed standing outside, which is even more of a hassle if it's raining or snowing.

Don't get me wrong, the Hennesey is very comfortable and I still use it occasionally on Canadian fishing trips but in my opinion for elk hunting it's not worth the hassle or inconvenience.

From: ohiohunter
01-Aug-13
I have a trek light hammock that packs up small and light enough to take in the field for mid-day naps if needed.

I just use a sleeping bag. It frosted a few nights during my hunt, but I was toasty. Just depends on how well and comfortably you can insulate yourself, same as when in a tent.

If I were to spike camp it this would undoubtedly be my choice. I sleep like a baby in this thing and it certainly reduces those aches you get when you get out of bed in the morning.

If I had anchors, I'd use it in my apartment instead of my tempurpedic.

01-Aug-13
Slept in a normal hammock, not a backpacking hammock a couple times camping. The sleep is much more comfortable than on the ground.

Cant comment on the temp cause each time I've used them it only got down into the 50s and I was in my 0 degree bag.

From: MC
01-Aug-13
"This topic has been discusses ad nauseam here on the elk forum. Do a search and you will find many threads covering the pros but mostly cons" - Norseman

The threads he referes to are very old. You need to know that hammock camping has come a long way in the last 5 - 10 years. Just as the hunting clothing industry has as well. The bigest factor for this is advanced materials and application. You also should know that elk hunters have not kept up with this about hammocks and the group tends to be more opinionated than other groups. People backpack all the major trails in the US (even the continental divide through the Rockies) with hammocks all the time but for some reason they just can't work for an elk hunt? WTF? I elk hunt up to 12,200' in late Sept in CO in my hammock for 10 to 12 days every year, rain sleet or snow, in as much comfort as can be had outdoors for that long.

I have a lot of experience in hammocks and I can tell you that Noresman or any other that slams hammocks do not know what they are talking about. And don't stake a lot on a guy that has one night in a hammock. Granted, there are things that you need to do right but it only takes knowledge, which is free to anyone wanting to know, but then there are the know it alls that spew crap from their mouths with no interest in knowing. I can't stand that type of person.

From the posts so far I can make these statements. 1 Eno hammocks are bottom of the barrel as for comfort mainly due to size/length, I think they have a larger model that would be ok so if you go with that brand make sure it is big/long enough. It should be about 120" long x 60" wide if you stretch it out so you get a good flat lay and not wrapped up like smarba describes. 2 You lay on a diagonal in these hammocks, if you don't know about laying diagonal you will have problems, if you do you will be very flat and comfortable. 3 Your foot end should be slightly higher than your head end. 4 The best set up uses under quilt and top quilt, preferably of down fill, rather than a pad. 4 Invest in a good tarp with doors like the superfly from Warbonnet for complete protection.

Pros - It is a wash for weight vs a tent/pad/bag. I am always warm, dry and comfortable. I sleep the same everynight regardless of relocating because the hang is the same. Can hang anywhere there are trees and there are trees everywhere I hunt, even on the steepest rocky slopes. Less time looking for suitable camping spots vs tent. You can set it up in about two minutes unless there is brush to clear between the trees. I tend ot pick trees with no brush if I can. You can sit in it like a camp chair.

Cons - My set up shares the same con that ground dwellers have with down fill bags. You have to protect the down from moisture for the whole trip.

From: elkhunter71
01-Aug-13
Thanks for all the info. Know to decide which one to buy?

From: Norseman
01-Aug-13
As cheesehead mentions... Not worth the hassle

Sorry to hit a sore spot with you MC. I have a Hennessey and tried it in Wy. Froze my butt off. Tried it again in Nm. Still was cold at night. Great for daytime naps though but bugs can still bite you through the material if there is no space seperating your flesh. I even talked with Hennessey about solutions. But they just made a new 4 season model. No real solution for the older models unless you want to spend hundreds more buying a bottom insulator and sewing in a pocket. After all this and the upgrade size in sleeping bag. A 3 person tent is just as light and has the room for pack cloths, gear, bow. My 20 degree down bag is good up to about 50 degree nights in my Hennessey. Just givin my opinion. Been there done that. To each his own I guess.

From: BowMad23
01-Aug-13

BowMad23's Link
Since MC was so quick to point that "everyone" else was wrong, here is a thread from 2 years ago, easily less than the 5-10 window.

Having said that I don't know much about them, but I would imagine he is right about their evolution in recent years.

From: olebuck
01-Aug-13
I take one, I either use it at camp for mid-day naps, or if I hike way in I will use it for mid-day naps in the woods if the elk aren't active all day.

From: BULELK1
01-Aug-13
Talk to Silent Stalker as he and his family members use them in Wyo elk hunting.

Talk about lite and bivy setting.

Good luck, Robb

From: MC
01-Aug-13
Cheesehead is one of the guys that went into the hammock thing illadvised and unprepared. He did it all wrong, had a bad time, and came on here spewing crap that he doesn't know about. Being ignorant doesn't make him or you right. You guys used a Hennessey with insuficient bottom insulation and tarp coverage. I've kept up with these threads over the years. You haven't been there and done that, you failed due to ignorance. That is like saying you went down the trailhead and buggled and no elk answered so you left because there are no elk there.

Here is the problem with Hennessey hammocks. I'll compare them to a regular end gathered hammock: 1. They are heavier than a regular hammock because of all the material. 2. They are very limited on the type of bottom insulation you can use due to their design, especially the old bottom entry designs. The proprietary insulation system they sell for them is not good for bivy hunting or cold temps in general. A conventional end gathered hammock can utilize bottom quilts from many suppliers and it is as warm as can be and they pack as small as the best lightweight tent and down bag combos that include a pad. 3. They are limited in space and coverage under the small tarp that comes with them. A conventional end gathered hammock can utilize any of the large full encapsulation tarps made by the same guys that make the quilts. They can offer as much space as any bivy tent, usually more space. Mine has doors.

You need a conventional end gathered hammock and use an underquilt. A good combination is the Warbonnet Traveller hammock, underquilt and topquilt and a superfly tarp. I personally wish Hennessey was not popular when they were becasue they made a bad influence on a lot of people.

I've never been bitten by bugs in Sept Colorado and I don't even use bugmesh at all. A lot of folks just use a tarp and throw their sleeping/bivy bag on the ground, some of them don't have mesh for bugs either. The only difference between the tarp ground guys and my hammock system is I am off the ground and it only costs me ounces more to do it. It is really only a few oz more weight than a lot of bivy bags. The combination of 20 degree underquilt and top quilt is about the same weight and compressed size of a top of the line 0 degree down mummy bag.

Cheesehead, Norseman and others got into hammocks with bad methods and models of gear for the conditions they tried to hang in and failed. Now they slam hammocks and ward off anyone that could very well love them. What is funny is that when more and more people start to use them the right way those old posts they wrote will forever show that they are the type guys that spout off about stuff they don't fully know about.

Sorry for ranting.

From: chasinbugles
01-Aug-13
Been using a Clark North American for three years now with absolutely no CONS. If you use a sleep pad it doesn't close in on you but you have the added weight of pad. By the time you add weight of pad plus tent not likely to come in under weight of hammock. I can sit in my hammock like a chair getting dressed and the pockets keep my gear off the ground and provide the insulation layer. I usually keep it open at night in early Sept. around 10,000' and have never been cold. Did I mention the tarp that comes with it to cook under in the rain. No need for level ground just two trees and you are set up. One last PRO, when it does rain you are off the ground and don't have to worry about ground water getting in. Love my hammock

From: Norseman
01-Aug-13

Norseman's embedded Photo
Norseman's embedded Photo
^. MC

From: Norseman
01-Aug-13
Whatever you guys decide to do, may you all stay warm and dry and have visions of prancing 6x6s as you peacefully slumber.

Good luck this season!

From: shedhead
02-Aug-13
2 words- bear pinata! :)

From: ki-ke out
02-Aug-13
Wow.

Good thing you guys didn't tell MC that his truck sucks! Imagine that lashing?

MC Are you a hammock salesman?

What's the best hammock for banana protection on an elk hunt?

From: MC
02-Aug-13
All I am saying is there is a difference between having an opinion and being ignorant.

People come on here with the intent to learn. They are hoping that they get good information. Why is it wrong to help them with that when you really know something and you see someone steering them astray. The only way to do that in this type of case is to show how a person is biased and or ignorant when they say wrong and biased things like that which could effect decisions people make. If we were standing around having this discussion I would set my stuff up and let you decide for yourself. Show you the inns and outs. And when a guy like Noresman comes up I would show you why he didn't know what he was talking about and try to show him what he did wrong. He would probably only have sarcastic things to say and leave non the better.

I know that it appears that I am just a loose cannon that went off but there is history behind the all these hammock threads that get torpedoed by the same group of guys using the same sarcastic phrases. They say this topic has been talked to death after they describe how they failed at hanging. I am just here to say that they are wrong and if you do it right you will not have a better sleep system in the bush. That even goes for most guys that think they can't do it. I really believe that, from a lot of experience. I spend at least 10% of the year in a hammock in all weather conditions. There is no way I would willingly spend that much time on a pad on the ground. I would even rather be in my hammock than on a cot in a wall tent.

From: ohiohunter
02-Aug-13
I have to agree MC. Too many people pawn things off on anecdotal evidence. No piece of equipment is 100% fail proof. And nothing is ever "one size fits all".

From: llamapacker
02-Aug-13
Ohiohunter makes a good point. While MC is clearly thrilled with his equipment, even if I were to buy the exact same gear it is entirely possible I will think it is terrible. We all do have personal preferences, and for me that includes sleeping on the ground in a tent. Bill

From: bb
02-Aug-13
I get a kick out of threads where someone gets their feathers ruffled about a subject. Then the explain that their opinion is based on facts while everyone elses opinion is based on ignorance. Gotta love it. In my opinion a hammock would be great if you filld your sleeping bag with chemical hand warmers and slept on them and built a tent around the hammock, and hired porters to carry everything

From: MC
05-Aug-13
OK, maybe you're right and I'm wrong. I probably should have given up long ago like you guys did.

Can you imagine what the world would be like if it were full of guys like you two?

From: bad karma
06-Aug-13
I use a Hennessey Hammock in September, and a Kifaru bag. I'm comfortable. Does it have limits? Yes. Does it work? Yes. Will you get cold when it's cold out? Yes, unless you underquilt it.

If it's going to get cold, I'm bringing the paratipi.

From: Stryker
08-Aug-13
I carry a mesh type of hammock that is very light weight and use it to hang between trees or if possible across a small stream and this is where I put my bones out meat from an elk instead of in a tree until I can get it all packed out. Your comments on freezing is the perfect point of using this for that purpose as it alows air to flow very well around the meat to allow cooking. When done the wife puts it in the washer and it is ready for the next trip.

From: Norseman
08-Aug-13
Nice positive info, Stryker! Thanks!

08-Aug-13
Hammocks are great in my opinion. Especially in extremely wet conditions. I got one because I couldn't afford a tent for long range pack trips. I do suggest you use some sort of insulation (space blanket, therma rest) if you are not acclimated to the cold nights. The hammock will save your back from sleeping on the ground, plus they make naps around camp a snap.

From: bpctcb
10-Aug-13
This will be my third year using a hammock for elk hunting. It can absolutely work, with the correct gear/technique.

First year I had a $20 gathered end hammock from academy. Underquilt was two poncho liners sewn together. My regular marmot helium gets used topside. Tarp was the Noah's tarp 9. This rookie system worked well, had room for improvement. I stayed dry, wasn't sleeping on the hard ground, and stayed as warm as I did on the ground.

Second year upgrades. JacksRBetter bridge hammock (you lay FLAT). Underquilt was a 0* down incubator. Tarp is a hennesey hex with 2qzq doors added. Marmot helium still gets the nod for topside insulation. I now have my ultimate sleep system. If you try out a quality system like this you will love it.

My buddy as a Clark NX-250 that is very nice, too.

BP

12-Aug-13
I've got two hammocks currently, a Warbonnet Blackbird 1.1 DL paired with a WB Mambajamba tarp with door kit. My wife sleeps in that one as she is a back sleeper and is shorter than me.

I'm 6'3" and toss and turn all night, so I use a Tree to Tree Trail Gear Switchback 1.9 SL with a custom OES MacCat tarp in snake skins.

HAMMOCKS ARE NOT COLD!!! IF you know what you're doing. I have a hammock gear 20° underquilt for my hammock, and several foam pads to use in my wife's. A top quilt will take me down into the 30's in mine. Below that and I prefer my Seek Outside LBO.

Hammocks are much more comfortable for me than sleeping on the ground, they are better in buggy country, they're better in rain and mud, and they are much faster to set up than a tent.

But, you need trees so above timberline is out, and it is more difficult to stay warm in truly cold temps. On a September elk hunt there is a distinct possibility that I will need to camp above timberline, so I will take the LBO. I love the hammock for 3 season camping and backpacking though.

12-Aug-13
How much does your hammock sleep system weigh and how bulky is it?

Do you guys have any photos, both set up and packed up?

From: elkhunter71
12-Aug-13
X2 what Cheesehead Mike said Thsnks for all your input.

From: jbone
12-Aug-13
As Smarba posted earlier, I used one, as well as he. We both used Hennesseys....I loved it, and he hated it. I think it really is an individual type thing...

I thought mine was great.....I think it was truly one of the best night's sleep that I ever had in the backcountry. I did get a little bit chilled in mine. I will be using a cheap foam pad the next time I use it (this weekend) - and can't wait!!!

JBone

12-Aug-13

RockChucker30's embedded Photo
RockChucker30's embedded Photo
I've tried a couple Hennesseys out but I'm too tall for the models I laid in, plus I don't really like their tarp arrangement.

Here is a pic of my two hung. I like the detached tarp because if the weather is nice I can set the pegs but disconnect the two on one side and flip the tarp over the ridgeline for single sided protection so I can stargaze. If it rains it takes a few seconds to flip it back over and snug it down.

12-Aug-13
Here's a pic of my hammock setup compressed. From left to right:

- EE 20° Rev X Quilt - Hammock Gear 20° Incubator underquilt - Tree to Tree Trail Gear Switchback 1.9 SL hammock with whoopie slings and tree straps with Dutch clips - Custom OES MacCat Deluxe tarp in snake skins - Nalgene for comparison

Everything but the nalgene weighs 6 lbs 9 oz. I could save around 10 oz by going with a netless hammock. If I were only using it for the CO highcountry I would do that, but I need bug protection here in TN.

12-Aug-13

RockChucker30's embedded Photo
RockChucker30's embedded Photo
Forgot the pic

From: MC
12-Aug-13
My set up is very similar to rockchucker's except I don't have bug screen on the hammock but I do have door flaps on my tarp so that is probably a wash. And my underquilt is the 3/4 length phoenix instead of the full length incubator so I am a little lighter in that regard. Keep in mind that the size reference he has given is compressible. The quilts will conform to the shape of the pack as other items food bag and clothes are stuffed in the pack and cinched down.

From: Gaur
12-Aug-13
I have a warbonnet blackbird and am waiting for a 800 down underquilt that I ordered for my elk hunt. Still trying to decide what to do for a over quilt. Going to look at what down bags we have up at the cabin this weekend. Didn't want to spend the money on a overquilt yet so will use the lightest 20 degree bag I can round up. the underquilt I ordered was 20 oz. I have a sil nylon rain fly as well.

From: westaner
13-Aug-13
Rockchucker , do you also carry a sleeping bag ?

From: westaner
13-Aug-13
Rockchucker , do you also carry a sleeping bag ?

13-Aug-13
Westaner, the top quilt and underquilt take the place of a sleeping bag. A TQ and UQ is as dialed as you can get a hammock setup. What most folks start out with is a foam pad and a sleeping bag they already have.

If you do the foam route then get a double layer hammock so you can put the foam between the layers. A blue walmart pad works fine. A sleeping bag is easier to use if you leave it unzipped and just pull it over you and tuck in the sides.

My TQ and UQ will be going into a single dry sack instead of their separate stuff sacks.

From: elkhunter71
14-Aug-13
Where is the best place to buy a hammock setup? And thanks for sll the input. I am going to try it this year if i can afford it.

14-Aug-13
I don't know if its the best place, but I bought a traveler double 1.7 from warbonnetoutdoors about two weeks ago.

The owner made sure to get to me very quickly. This is my first time (in a while) using a hammock so I went cheap and will reuse what I have already. (RockChucker30's point)

Cost with shipping was around $85.

This coupled with my Kelty 12x12 tarp comes in at 4.5lbs. I'm going to use a 30x48, 3/8" closed cell foam pad to keep as much cold out as I can.

AB

From: Bowhunner
14-Aug-13
I wear a banana hammock on warm weather hunts.

From: snapcrackpop
14-Aug-13
Don't forget to lay diagonally, not lengthwise.

From: flybyjohn
15-Aug-13
I have used just the cheap lightweight, no bell or whistles hammock for the last 2 years. I only live 24 miles from where I hunt so I can always check the weather before I go out for a couple of days. The things I like most about the hammock is that it is lightweight, comfortable for me, and I can hang it almost anywhere where I hunt. Sometimes I sleep on steep hillsides where my head is almost on the ground and my feet are up 5 feet on the downhill tree. I have slept in weather down to 40 deg F with my 0 degree sleeping bag in the hammock and have been comfortable. I have once placed my hammock as low as I could to the ground and put my gear up against the sides of the hammock to keep the air from blowing under me and it seemed to work pretty well. I used to sleep on the ground but now I only use my cheap hammock, but remember, I am not stuck in the woods if the weather turns bad, I can always go home if the conditions are not favorable and come back the next day.

15-Aug-13

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
It's great that you guys have found hammock systems that work for you.

I'm open minded and tried a hammock before most people even heard of them for hunting. As much as I wanted it to, it didn't work well for me.

I know I might be labeled as ignorant and negative by some, but here goes...

When I pack into the mountains I'm usually there for 5 to 9 days before returning to my truck to restock or regroup. Food for 9 days takes up a lot of room in my pack. One of the problems I had with the hammock was how bulky everything was that I had to carry to stay warm.

Also, I can sit up in my tent and get dressed or undressed. I have room for my pack inside my tent and if it's raining or snowing really hard I can stay in my tent and study maps, read, whatever. I can also cook (boil water) in my vestibule while sitting up or laying in my sleeping bag. I also have room for my boots and my bow inside a vesibule.

Questions for you guys that use hammocks.

1. Can you get dressed/undressed inside and how easy is it? Do you bring your boots inside?

2. Do you have room for pack and or bow inside with you?

3. Can you cook/boil water inside the hammock?

4. Would you be comfortable inside the hammock all day if you had to stay there because of weather?

5. Can you comfortably study maps, read, etc. inside the hammock?

6. How many days do you usually stay out on the mountain continuously and do you have room in your pack for all the gear and food for 5 to 9 days?

7. How hard is it to get in and out of the hammock to answer the call of nature?

The attached photo is my sleeping gear consisting of a Stoic 15 degree down bag, Neoair pad and Double Rainbow tent with a can of beer for size perspective. Total weight is 6 pounds 13 ounces, minus the beer.

Again, I'm not slamming hammocks or anybody who uses them, but the bulkiness of all the gear and the answers to the questions above are what made me decide against mine.

15-Aug-13

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Here's my sleeping gear when I use the GoLite Hut1 tarp shelter instead of the Double Rainbow. Total weight is 5 pounds 5 ounces.

From: MC
15-Aug-13
Questions for you guys that use hammocks.

1. Can you get dressed/undressed inside and how easy is it? Do you bring your boots inside? Yes, my tarp is a separate piece of equipment and I can raise or lower it in relation to the hammock. I can pitch it where it touches the ground and looks like a big two man tent or raise it up higher where there is a gap between it and the ground, depending on the wind. I sit in my hammock and change clothes and only have to stand up to pull up my pants. The ridgeline of the tarp is above my head. If I had a hennessey like yours this would be almost impossible.

2. Do you have room for pack and or bow inside with you? Yes, my tarp is big. See picture of the model.

3. Can you cook/boil water inside the hammock? Of course, just like as if I were sitting on a log and cooking with stove on the ground. You can even lean over the side of the hammock and cook while laying down. But I sit in it with my feet on the ground. My but is usually about a foot off the ground.

4. Would you be comfortable inside the hammock all day if you had to stay there because of weather? More comfortable than on the ground. I've had to do that.

5. Can you comfortably study maps, read, etc. inside the hammock? Yes

6. How many days do you usually stay out on the mountain continuously and do you have room in your pack for all the gear and food for 5 to 9 days? I took 7 days food last year but stayed out 6. Then went back out for 5 more.

7. How hard is it to get in and out of the hammock to answer the call of nature? As easy as getting out of a traditional porch hammock that you have hanging in your back yard. If I had a Hennessey it would be more difficult, like having a wrestling match at 2 am.

This is why I say that you need to learn more about them. They have evolved since you got yours. Ditch it and get a conventional hammock with quilts and a good tarp. You will see that it takes up no more space in the pack after the pack is loaded and the down quilts are compressed. The only difference between your Hut1 tarp shelter and my set up is I have a hammock holding me off the ground and it only costs me a pound and its volume is between the size of a softball and a small canelope. A pound is all and for the amount of comfort it gives it is well worth it.

No more digging trenches around the tarp edges to keep water from getting to your bag either.

From: Beendare
15-Aug-13
I agree with Norseman, from what I've seen, a hammock is a rookie thing or a fanboy thing.

I know one guy whose hammock was all ripped to shreds from a fluke storm we got in 2006.....IMO, asking for trouble placing a big tarp 5' off the ground where the wind can shred it.

I can use my 2# 4oz tent anywhere even above timberline- cook, dress, move in any position on my side,stomach knees or back- with all; tent, bag and Exped long/wide matt=6#

16-Aug-13
For anyone interested, hammockforums is a great place to learn about hammocks.

I have a TTT Trail Gear Switchback which is good for tall side sleepers who toss and turn. The Warbonnet Blackbird is very popular but IME is better for back sleepers who don't turn as much.

Hammocks are easier to get out of in the night, they are easier in wet weather, and you've got a built in chair.

They do have limitations IMO. Timberline is a big one and really bad storms is another. A good tarp will ride out a bad storm just fine, but I'd still rather be in a lower profile shelter pegged to the ground in 8+ places vs a tarp floating above ground and pegged in 4 corners in really high winds. Of course as always site selection makes a huge difference. If you're smart your hammock won't be taking full force winds.

16-Aug-13

wrkhrdwrksmrt's embedded Photo
wrkhrdwrksmrt's embedded Photo
i just bivy'ed in for a short two day scouting trip and i have to say hammocks are the way to go. i just got the eno single nest a couple days ago and was worried i would get cold or just not feel comfortable.

that was the best two nights of sleep i have ever had in the woods. i did get a little hot but that was the weathers' fault not the hammocks. you could sleep on your sides or back but not stomach. with a fly, insulator pad, and hammock it was about 2.5 pounds. i know their are lighter tents but i have never slept so comfortable. you dont have to worry about level ground or a rock jabbing you in the hip all night. i will try it out this winter to see if i can stay warm without packing to much. the only problem is you need two solid anchor points to hang it.

i loved it and will use it again this year! sorry for the dark pic. it was late and i didnt have the fly up. i didnt need it.

From: MC
16-Aug-13
Who wants to camp above tree line? Why would you want to? Are you saying this is your only option? I have never elk hunted anywhere where the only option to camp was above tree line. There is always trees within half mile of any elk hunting I have ever seen. Anywhere.

From: jbone
16-Aug-13
I will be in mine starting tonight for the couple of nights....YEA!!!!!

From: Rut Nut
16-Aug-13
Is MC related to TurkeyBowMaster?! ;-)

From: JokerTZ
13-Jun-21
As I know, most hammocks include carabiners that have a sufficient strength rating. But a pair of tree straps - your suspension system - is often purchased separately. Make sure that any strap you buy is at least 0.75 inches wide because thinner straps may dig into bark and damage trees. If you’re sleeping and the cool air is wrapping around your bottom side, it will feel icy cold if there’s no insulation underneath you. One option is to slip a sleeping pad into your hammock. A separate underquilt is warmer, though, because it hangs outside, where you won’t compress the insulation between you and the hammock. This hangs above the hammock and uses guylines to maintain a taut pitch. As with any tarp, bigger models offer more protection and rain can sneak underneath it occasionally when the wind blows sideways.

13-Jun-21
If setup properly, a hammock is just as warm as any tent bag combo. I use them all the time on overnight and weekend hunting trips. Sometimes Into the teens.

You need an under quilt. Mine is climashield and is made of 3.5 ounce. It’s rated at 20 degrees. It weighs about 16 ounces in its stuff sack.

I use an over quilt too. I made it. I have them with 3.6 ounce climashield up to 10 ounce climashield. 3.5 down into the 40’s. 5 ounce into the 30’s. 7.5 ounce down to 25 or so. And the 10 ounce down to however low it’ll go.

You don’t need a bunch. And, if you can only have one, get the 10 ounce insulation to sew yours out of. Or buy one. It’s easy to cool off. It’s tough to sleep on the edge of cold. Your top quilt weight is going to run you about 20 ounces.

You need a tarp. I’ve got 4 season tarps that have doors. I’ve got minimalists tarps that do nothing but keep the dew and frost off. I’d advise a hexagon shaped, catenary cut tarp that’s a foot longer then your hammock. When setup up, it’ll keep the nastiest wind blown water off but , be much lighter then a 4 season tarp. It’s going to weigh around 16-17 ounces with suspension.

Finally, there’s the hammock. This is where 99% of the people who use them screw up. They buy an eno or something name brand. And, what they get is a short hammock that’s is no where near as comfy as a longer one. I’ve been down this road and spent a lot of money on stuff that worked. But, wasn’t nearly as comfy as a longer hammock.

I’m 5’9” tall and run an eleven foot hammock. I can lay nearby sideways in it and do a lot of time. It’s so much more comfortable then the eno’s and other popular brands that rarely measure 10’ long. Most being 9’.

A good hammock with proper length is going to run you about $50. Not anymore then the shortys the name brands sell. Buy from a vendor who makes them. I bought mine from Dutch ware gear. I’m guessing I bought 6 brands of popular hammocks before this one. I’ve run this one for 6 years and ain’t changing. It’s that much more comfy.

The last two bits of info I’ll give you is to buy a hammock with material rated for your weight. It’ll be tempting to buy an 8 ounce hammock from one of the cottage vendors. But, unless you weigh 150 pounds, it’s going to stretch with you. Wrapping the sides around you. Becoming uncomfortable.

Name brand offerings make this consideration irrelevant. As they almost all use parachute nylon. Which would hold a truck. But, cottage guys offer a lot of material and weights. Keep this in mind.

Use a structure ridge line too. Start your adjustment at around 81% of total hammock length. Play with it until the hammock conforms perfectly to the shape of your body when laying at a diagonal in it. You’ll know when you get there. As you won’t move once it’s right. Kinda like a million fingers of angels holding and cradling you. Be prepared to wake up exactly as you went to sleep. No waking up uncomfortable.

So, buy one with material rated for your weight. The difference in finished weight won’t be more then an ounce or two. But the comfort it’ll provide over one that stretches will be priceless. My hammock with suspension cones in at 13 ounces.

The cons of a hammock setup are the weight versus a piece of house wrap or roof underlayment, a pad, a bag or quilt, and a tarp. And the bulk. It takes double the pack space.

My hammock setup with my self made 10 ounce over quilt comes in at 57 ounces. Unless you customize your top quilt and tarp like I did, you are going to be close to 60-65 ounces. Basically 5 pounds.

An ultralight setup can beat that if you spend big money. By how much I don’t know. But, I’m guessing 5-6 ounces of you use synthetic and buy a very expensive, minimalist pad.

But, you know what you get with that. I like to sleep. I like to sleep lights out. So, I’m going with the hammock every time. No contest. That’s the pros of it. Unaltered sleep. Nothing else compares.

I got long winded. To try and help people understand what it takes to get this right. I’m almost 50 years old. I can’t go on lousy sleep for days on end. I can’t get all stoved up and go day after day like when I was young. I imagine everyone on here is in that boat. Which is why it’s important to know how to make the hammock setup work for you.

Good luck and God bless.

From: jordanathome
13-Jun-21
Well crap, that cost me some change.......but as much as I love my Hennessy Hammock I am up for trying out a Dutchware Chameleon . Thanks Justin! (51 years here and will turn another mid archery season).

13-Jun-21
I am one who doesn't sleep well unless I'm comfortable. I'm so tempted to get a hammock and your info WV might just be the push to get one.

13-Jun-21
If you decide to try it out, shoot me a message. I’ll help you choose a hammock with the proper weight material. I always go heavier on the material weight since I often put my pack and stuff in the hammock with me. I’d advise the same to you regardless if you do that or not. There is no harm in buying a weight of fabric that is over rated. But, there’s serious trade offs for one that is underrated.

Good luck.

From: arnold44
14-Jun-21
I've been choosing hammock recently, and was comparing two different models called Wise Owl Outfitters SingleOwl hammock and Kootek Camping Double. I could find both of them here at best camping hammock web site. Article has been written by a professional wildlife expert, in my opinion, cause he explains every pro and con about each outdoor thing, that you may want to get with you in a travel, trip or hunting.

From: Grey Ghost
14-Jun-21
I really wanted to embrace hammocks as a viable sleeping setup for backpacking. Unfortunately, every night I've spent in a hammock has been some of the most miserable sleeps I've ever had. I never could get comfortable, no matter what position I tried. And getting in and out to take a late night leak is ridiculous.

I'll take my sleeping bag with integrated pad over a hammock any day and twice on Sundays.

Matt

07-Jul-21
I love mine and would never go back. I use a light weight tarp over the top and a foam pad under my sleeping bag.

From: Mule Power
07-Jul-21
Pass! I’m not interested in having air circulation under me. Think about it….. thats what we do to quarters to get them to cool down as fast as possible.

From: jordanathome
07-Jul-21
I sleep hot so air circulation in moderation is a good thing.......plus you can rock yerself to sleep. LOL

From: Jaquomo
07-Jul-21
I'm there with Grey Ghost. Never could get comfortable, and getting untangled to pee...

From: PushCoArcher
07-Jul-21
Love my hammock! Seriously you guy's I can lean a little to the side and arch it out without leaving the hammock just remember what side in the morning. Only screwed it up once.

From: hobbes
08-Jul-21
I've not read the full list of responses, but......I don't like laying in them in my backyard, so no way I'm sleeping in one in the backcountry.

From: Jaquomo
08-Jul-21
If I tried to lean to the side and arc it out I'm afraid I'd end up face first in a puddle of pee..

08-Jul-21
In a double bridge hammock like the ones in back yards, if you sneeze wrong they’ll flip your tail end out. In a gathered end hammock, it’d take considerable effort to flip out. I mean you’d have to try and try pretty hard.

Air circulation causing problems is just a theory if you are using an under quilt.

If getting in and out is a problem, your hammock isn’t hanging correctly. It has too much slack in it.

I’m not trying to be a contrarian. But, It’s all what you put into it. And, if you think you are going to just hang one and go to peaceful sleep, without the knowledge or the right gear, like a structural ridge line, you are going to be disappointed.

They might not be the thing for you. But, if it’s a comfort issue causing that, it’s because you were doing it wrong. Not being a wise guy. Just trying to be honest.

Whatever the individual decides is their business. Good luck.

From: jordanathome
08-Jul-21
I think once is once too many to piss all up in my hammock by mistake. I like to swing my legs out over the edge and let it fly. If its cold I might need to coax things into position before engaging the flow. Like a turtle not wanting to poke its head out at times.....Lou would not understand that problem. LOLOLOL

I also keep my boots right below where my feet hang out the side so I can just slide right into them and take a few painfree steps away to a good spot to wet down and mark my territory.

The really bee's knees part of having a hammock in camp is it makes a great place to sit, relax, cool off in the shade when you are taking a break from the hunt, as well as being a bed. The key for my comfort is as WVM said, knowing how to properly hang it with a solid ridge line and proper tension so that when I lay asymmetrically I am pretty darn flat rather than curled up. When I find myself sliding down into a ball I know I've screwed something up.

From: Jaquomo
08-Jul-21
I guess I never got the hang of it. I'm a side sleeper and whatever hammock I was in wasn't conducive to that. Probably doing it wrong.

From: jordanathome
08-Jul-21
Lou, if you were a back sleeper I'm not sure a hammock has sufficient clearance for that morning wood based on a probably fraudulent xray. LOLOLOL......and I don't even want to think about you sleeping on your stomach. hahahhaha.....

I too am a side sleeper. I get what you are saying. But I love me a hammock.

16-Jul-21
I am 72 and don't get much sleep on the ground these days, so I've been using a hammock when I bivy since 2013. In the 1960's, 70's, 80', and 90's I would bivy with a tarp and a sleeping bag and move camp every night until I found elk. I would find a large fallen log and after clearing any snags, I'd spread the tarp over the log, dive under and sleep. I'd sleep on the downhill side of the log and the log would stop any rainwater from getting to me. I'm soft in my old age, only hammock bivy for me, comfort is my number one priority. This is what I know or is my opinion. I'm a side sleeper and sometimes a back sleeper so I use a bridge hammock. If you are primarily a back sleeper you might enjoy a gathered end hammock. If you are certain that the weather will be warm you can get by with only a tarp, a hammock, and a sleeping bag. In the areas that I bow hunt, there is always the possibility of cold and snowy weather. Because of this, there is no chance that the gear necessary for hammocking, can be lighter that a ground sleeping setup. To stay warm and dry, I carry a winter tarp (which goes to the ground and has velcroed doors on both ends), a 20 degree down under quilt, and a zero degree sleeping bag. All weighty and bulky. As a result, I usually pre-plan a bivy location and end up making two trips into that spot. That is so my old bones can carry equipment for at least five days more easily. Where there are single track trails that allow it, I own a Rokon, a Yamaha TW200, and a mountain bike, all items that would have disgusted me when I was young and seeking true solitude. I could add much more, but I must go for now.

16-Jul-21

SandTrapArcher's embedded Photo
A standard hammock tarp allows too much wind flow for 30 degree or colder hammock camping.
SandTrapArcher's embedded Photo
A standard hammock tarp allows too much wind flow for 30 degree or colder hammock camping.
This was one of my 2013 bivys. Even with the down under quilt, I got very cold on a 25 degree night.

16-Jul-21

SandTrapArcher's embedded Photo
Sorry, wrong picture. See the next picture to fit this caption.
SandTrapArcher's embedded Photo
Sorry, wrong picture. See the next picture to fit this caption.
In this 2016 camp I used a tarp with doors on both ends but it was not big enough to go completely to the ground. I now use a 16x16 Noahs tarp on which I have velcro doors installed. It goes to the ground and closes on both ends if I choose. Much warmer.

16-Jul-21

SandTrapArcher's embedded Photo
2016 bivy. Still cold
SandTrapArcher's embedded Photo
2016 bivy. Still cold

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