Garmin Xero Bow Sight
Pricing question
International
Contributors to this thread:
Bushwacker 20-Jan-15
B N A A guy 20-Jan-15
Bushwacker 21-Jan-15
caller79065 21-Jan-15
Zebrakiller 21-Jan-15
Firehuntfish 21-Jan-15
ollie 21-Jan-15
Bill VanderLaan 21-Jan-15
jstephens61 21-Jan-15
Aftermerl 21-Jan-15
bghunter 22-Jan-15
Aftermerl 22-Jan-15
jstephens61 22-Jan-15
Bill VanderLaan 23-Jan-15
writer 23-Jan-15
Bou'bound 25-Jan-15
Aftermerl 25-Jan-15
Chief 419 25-Jan-15
jstephens61 26-Jan-15
AZ~Rich 26-Jan-15
Bou'bound 26-Jan-15
jstephens61 26-Jan-15
Bigpizzaman 26-Jan-15
ollie 27-Jan-15
From: Bushwacker
20-Jan-15
Having never hunted outside the US before and thinking about taking my daughter to Africa in a couple of years, I have been trying to glean information from everyones post. One of the things I must have missed is in regards to the pricing on some of the websites. For example, it will say "father & son" package hunt and it includes 1 x impala 1 x warthog 1 x kudu etc, etc for $xxxxx

then further down there is a price list of each animal.

Why does it say the package hunt for $xxxx and then there is an additional trophy fee?

I know this is probably a dumb question, but I'm going to ask anyway.

From: B N A A guy
20-Jan-15
Not at all a dumb question buddy. The package price is just that ( a set package for set species ) It is highly probable that you will encounter many other species outside of your package. This is where the trophy fees enter in. In some instances you may be able to swap out one species for another if it is equal or lesser value. This would all depend on what outfit you pick and what your PH says.

Best regards, Scott Alberda

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From: Bushwacker
21-Jan-15
Ok, thanks for clearing that up. So if the animal, say a Kudo, is mentioned in the package price, then there is no size limit? Price is for said animal.

From: caller79065
21-Jan-15
That would depend on the outfitter, some charge more for larger animals. Usually its all spelled out in their literature

From: Zebrakiller
21-Jan-15
this is not always the case but ask, sometimes if you buy the package and lets say you only get one in the package , and you also shoot two outside package you pay for both , so you maybe better off paying daily fees , and trophy fees on just what you shoot its an option, just because its in your package does not mean you will get it, I have only hunted africa twice but both times Gemsbok where the top of my list I never released an arrow but everyone else in my group shot one. Bill

From: Firehuntfish
21-Jan-15

Firehuntfish's Link
Bushwacker,

Absolutely not a dumb question...Safari pricing can sometimes be confusing if you are not familiar with the format. Most outfitters will put packages together that encompass a set amount of both hunting days and number of trophy animals, usually with the most popular species included. Packages are popular, many clients request them, and they can be a very good deal, so we do offer them. However, not all packages fit all guests desires.

For this reason, we allow some flexibility within most of our packages to allow for the guest to add, subtract, or substitute trophies at the package rate. We prefer still, to create a custom proposal to match the desired trophy wish list for each guest. You should never be forced into a package that doesn't specifically meet your wishes. And, no reputable outfitter should ever charge you for a trophy animal in a package that is not taken during the safari.

The most reputable outfitters will be very up front with their pricing with no gimmicks or hidden costs. When doing your research, make sure that all costs, along with included and excluded services are clearly listed in your hunting agreement.

From: ollie
21-Jan-15
Many times when an outfitter offers a "freebie" as part of the package deal, they are offering an animal that is abundant on their lands and is usually a lower- or moderate-priced animal like warthog, impala, or gemsbok. It is unlikely they will include an animal that is less abundant without paying the trophy fee. Outfitters make more money on trophy fees than daily hunt fees and are probably less inclined to offer special deals on the most highly desired animals like kudu which tend to get the highest trophy fees.

21-Jan-15
You should definitely ask if the animals in the package can be exchanged for similarly priced animals. That way, if you spend the week hunting for a zebra and a gemsbok presents itself, you can take the gemsbok (realize that you will immediately see a few dozen zebras). If you have your heart set on a specific animal(s), the PH/outfitter will put together a package with the animals that you want.

I would also echo Ollie's comment about the freebies. One of the places where I hunted, they had to thin out the impala, so it was "shoot two and get the third one free".

From: jstephens61
21-Jan-15
Definitely check if you can exchange animals. You may only see one or two on each animal on the lists, but hundreds of something else. I did learn that the advice to take what Africa offers is sound advice.

From: Aftermerl
21-Jan-15
I too found it confusing at first. The truth is, it was quite simple, at least for the outfitter I used. The package price is for the animals on said list. The Trophy list is the value each animal on the outfitters concession to him. If I decided I wanted a Gemsbok(Oryx) after seeing them in person, instead of critter offered in package deal. I simply check the trophy fee list and decide if I can afford it to be added to my total safari cost. If a budget is a big concern I may be allowed to trade up (or across) and pay the difference. On my safari, I didn't really want a Wildebeest ($950.trophy value). I did want a $1550.00 Gemsbok/Oryx (again trophy fee list value). I had to add $550.00 bucks to my over all packaged hunt. FYI, Now I want the darn Wildebeest as well. Can you say CHA-CHING, now I have to go back with the bride. wink wink. I also was allowed to add a zebra too, at $1400 or so. PM me, I would love to share with you some valuable info.

From: bghunter
22-Jan-15
Remember it is always cheaper to take the animal when you are thete then to go back. I had a chance at an nyala for 2 grand at the time. I said no well heck Thay is the cost for just my airfare now Congo back, so keep that in mind.

Some outfitters will allow you to wire money too once you get home if you don't have it with you at the time

From: Aftermerl
22-Jan-15
bghunter is absolutely right. My outfitter did that for us as well. He offered us extra animal on just the promise of payment when we got home. I ask how he could trust us being so far away. He told me a hunter wasn't going to travel all that way and spend that kinda money only then to stiff him on a very small amount. He went on to tell of a guy who left his camp earlier in 2013 owing him $22,000. He did admit being a little nervous over that amount. I doubt all are as generous, but some are.

From: jstephens61
22-Jan-15
I had to wire Barefoot Safaris $1100 when I got back. Wife got carried away when I had her in the blind with me. Would have been a lot more, she keep trying to talk me into shooting a sable that was hanging around.

23-Jan-15
...she keep trying to talk me into shooting a sable that was hanging around.

For better or for worse, right? :)

From: writer
23-Jan-15
"...for richer or poorer," is often more like it.

From: Bou'bound
25-Jan-15
Would you trade a sable for a kudu straight up pricewise

From: Aftermerl
25-Jan-15
Dollars and cents wise, Trading a Sable for a Kudu is a very very bad trade. Personally I don't care much for the Sable, and I saw a few. So, yes I would trade at this point in my life. Wish I had clipped one of those Nyala Bulls I kept seeing too.

From: Chief 419
25-Jan-15
Bou, A Sable in SA is approximately $11,000 to $13,000. A Kudu is anywhere from $1900 to $2,800. Pricewise, there isn't any comparison. Kudu should be on your "to kill list" on your first trip. Sable is great if you have more money than you can spend.

From: jstephens61
26-Jan-15
Mine was offered at a discounted $6800, that's why the wife wanted it. It was ON SALE!!

From: AZ~Rich
26-Jan-15

AZ~Rich's embedded Photo
AZ~Rich's embedded Photo
You can find Sable "on Sale" if you look around. There are several "farms" that breed Sable in the country and with demand always high they have maintained a steep price tag. $6800 is very good. More usual is $7,000-$8,500 depending on size. Really big bulls over 40" will cost you even more.

From: Bou'bound
26-Jan-15
I wouldn't mind one on sale but how do i know it is a good solid deal and not something that is going to give me problems down the road in some way.

I want one i can count on and not a discounted model that ends up leaving me disappointed in the long run.

there is more than just price when shopping for a sable.

From: jstephens61
26-Jan-15

jstephens61's embedded Photo
jstephens61's embedded Photo
This was the model I passed on.

From: Bigpizzaman
26-Jan-15

Bigpizzaman's embedded Photo
Bigpizzaman's embedded Photo
Sometimes a man gets carried away and shoot's a lot of animals!!!!!!!!! Good thing I told the wife Impala's were $25!!!!!!!!!!!!

From: ollie
27-Jan-15
"Good thing I told the wife Impala's were $25!!!!!!!!!!!!"

Missing a few zeros in that number!

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