Mathews Inc.
Draw length = Arrow lenght
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
bowhunter 08-Mar-15
wyobullshooter 08-Mar-15
drycreek 08-Mar-15
oldgoat 08-Mar-15
JTV 08-Mar-15
4blade 09-Mar-15
greenmountain 09-Mar-15
Bowfreak 09-Mar-15
CT bow junkie 09-Mar-15
12yards 09-Mar-15
Buck Watcher 09-Mar-15
Swampbuck 09-Mar-15
Bake 09-Mar-15
sundowner 09-Mar-15
chasintheslam 09-Mar-15
JTV 09-Mar-15
bowhunter 09-Mar-15
Dino 09-Mar-15
Spike Bull 10-Mar-15
GotBowAz 10-Mar-15
Spike Bull 11-Mar-15
sundowner 11-Mar-15
Tracker 11-Mar-15
beckerbulldog 12-Mar-15
MathewsMan 12-Mar-15
MathewsMan 12-Mar-15
Southpaw25 04-Jan-19
Trial153 04-Jan-19
RogBow 04-Jan-19
Franklin 04-Jan-19
Ermine 04-Jan-19
Shawn 04-Jan-19
bow_dude 05-Jan-19
GF 05-Jan-19
DoorKnob 05-Jan-19
oldgoat 05-Jan-19
Native Okie 05-Jan-19
midwest 05-Jan-19
joehunter 05-Jan-19
LostNwoods 05-Jan-19
WV Mountaineer 05-Jan-19
From: bowhunter
08-Mar-15
I've been hunting for 10 plus years, I have a "28" draw lenght , my arrow is "27" . What is your draw lenght vs your arrow lenght? Should you arrow be a tad longer or shorter than your DL, this was a topic today at the archery shop, no real answer, can anyone else shine some light into this question, Thanks..

08-Mar-15
My D/L is 26 1/2" and my shafts are cut to 261/4". The shaft has to be long enough that the BH isn't drawn into your rest at full draw. Beyond that, the point where that shaft is tuned to your bow and tip weight should determine shaft length. As you shorten the shaft, it will get stiffer. As the shaft lengthens, it will get weaker.

From: drycreek
08-Mar-15
My draw length is 28.5 and my arrows are 28.75 from nock valley to insert.

From: oldgoat
08-Mar-15
I personally base it on the type of rest you use with a compound. With a full capture rest you can go as short as you want if you don't pull it past the rest. With a non full capture rest i used to cut them no shorter than my draw length. With traditional gear you make them whatever length they need to be to tune.

From: JTV
08-Mar-15
Draw length has NOTHING to do with arrow length ... it all depends on where your rest is positioned ...I shoot a 29.5" draw out of both Bowtech's and my arrow length is 28" .... I cut my arrows so they are 1"-1.5" in front of the rest....

From: 4blade
09-Mar-15
I draw 29 and shoot 29" arrows because that length is the best spined arrow for my setup.

09-Mar-15
I am not sure what my draw length is but I shoot full length arrows. They Could be a bit shorter but I like the broadhead at least 1/2 beyond the riser.

From: Bowfreak
09-Mar-15
Proper arrow length should be determined based on desired spine. Other factors to consider are desired finished arrow weight and rest type but IMHO cut arrows to yield the best tuning shaft.

09-Mar-15
Arrow should be cut so it sites 1" in front of your rest at full draw.

From: 12yards
09-Mar-15
29" DL, 28" arrows.

From: Buck Watcher
09-Mar-15
Bowfreak has it right....."Proper arrow length should be determined based on desired spine."

I measure the arrow length so the BH is past my bowhand fingers at full draw. This is my arrow minimum length, I like to keep my fingers. I then go to Pinwheel Shaft Selector and put in all the components specs (always with heavy insert, FFP-360 or SK-300 Flex-fletch vanes). Then I play with spine, tip weight and arrow length to get the correct spine. I usually try to get it just on the heavy side but still in the green.

This has worked very well for me.

From: Swampbuck
09-Mar-15
27" D - 26 3/4" A

From: Bake
09-Mar-15
27 1/2 in. draw length, 26 1/2 inch FMJ arrows. They look like little darts, but they hit hard!

Bake

From: sundowner
09-Mar-15
JTV has it right. He usually does.

09-Mar-15
DRAW 27.5 ARROW 26.5 carbon to nock valley

From: JTV
09-Mar-15
Sundowner...99.95 % of the time ... ;0)

From: bowhunter
09-Mar-15
Thanks for all the input, like I said in the beginning lots of opinions, but I guess it comes down yo what works for us.

From: Dino
09-Mar-15
My DL=29", arrow =28"

10-Mar-15
4blade touched on it, Bowfreak nailed it, Buck Watcher tells you the very best method for choosing the correct shafts and their finished specs.

Shaft length is the most effective way to adjust spine.

Obviously, once a shaft is cut, you may have very limited options to control that critical factor, spine, so I would add that fine tuning your DRAW WEIGHT to match the shafts you have already properly built is worth the effort at this point.

I also prefer stiffer shafts for a Whisker Biscuit because of the nature of that great rest. Other rests, including some full captures, may or may not operate better that way but most will.

Spine is way too often overlooked, even by pro shoos. Also very important for best accuracy is where you locate the "backbone" of the shaft. That is the stiffest side of a shaft that is built by wrapping a "mat" of epoxy impregnated carbon fiber around a steel mandril to set up as a shaft. This leaves a stiff spot along the shaft, the "backbone" where the overlap is.

The shaft flexes away from the backbone when loaded up at release. Which way it flexes determines what and how much interference that shaft gets on it's way past the rest/bow. Making sure you build your arrows with the cock vane opposite the backbone will insure the flex is away from the obstacles it can touch on the way by.

Building all your arrows with the backbone on the bottom will assure consistency at launch.

Building all your arrows with the FB broadheads in the same position when on the bow, (I like one blade straight up,) will minimize aerodynamic differences at launch which are caused by nock travel which, coincidently, lines my blades up with my vanes.

From: GotBowAz
10-Mar-15
Spike bull, that's sounds pretty interesting however how do you locate the "backbone"? Is this something that is visible?

I have heard of a stiffer side to an arrow and your explanation seems feasible from a manufacturing perspective. However I was to understand plugging the ends of an arrow with foam and setting them in water would determine the "Backbone" which would be heavy side down.

11-Mar-15
The direction of the bend is away from the stiff side.

From: sundowner
11-Mar-15
I once knew a guy who floated his arrows to find the heavy side. Problem was, he couldn't shoot well enough to tell the difference!

I suspect many here are the same. I know I am!

From: Tracker
11-Mar-15
My draw length is 29" and my arrows are 31". I shoot the longest arrow I can spine properly. I'm shooting a longbow.

12-Mar-15
I have a 25-1/2" draw length but my arrows are +2" longer because of spine. I shoot Easton Da'torch arrows and my shop cut them as short as they could, 28" I think, without screwing up the spine.

From: MathewsMan
12-Mar-15
26.5" draw and shoot 27.5" arrows

From: MathewsMan
12-Mar-15
26.5" draw and shoot 27.5" arrows

From: Southpaw25
04-Jan-19
I shoot 28.5 draw length and my arrows are 26.5” long. I think with parallel limbs and concaved risors it allows for a much shorter arrow.

From: Trial153
04-Jan-19
28" draw, 26 inch arrows

From: RogBow
04-Jan-19
Long enough for a fixed blade broadhead to clear a gloved bow hand and be able to let down without interference.

From: Franklin
04-Jan-19
X3 with Bowfreak.

From: Ermine
04-Jan-19
27 inch draw. 26 inch arrows. 460 grains

From: Shawn
04-Jan-19
JTV has got it and whoever said 1" from the rest or whatever is fine but it is not right. I see top shooters who have 3"s in front f their rest and others 1/4" maybe. I now shoot 28.5"s and shoot a 26.5" arrow and have 1/2' or so past my rest. Shawn

From: bow_dude
05-Jan-19
Depends on if the bow is a reflex riser or a deflex riser. Also depends on the rest and placement of the rest on the bow. I am a 30 inch draw but my arrows are cut to 28 inches for my current bow. My arrow point sits 1/2 inch past the front of the rest. Prior to riser window cutouts, it was the standard to have your arrow sit 1 inch past the front of the riser. With the introduction of riser window cutouts, that practice pretty well disappeared. Certainly spine plays into it as well. The practice of overdraws has once again started being used. This time for a different reason than years ago. Setting the arrow rest behind the riser to the correct distance comes into play when it comes to torque tuning. That distance will vary with the shooter, the bow, and where the sight sits on the bow. I also bare shaft shoot my shafts thru paper to determine the arrow spine rather than use an arrow spine tool. I prefer to setup my shafts to dynamic spine rather than the static spine. Sometimes they are different, so I shoot mine to determine the dynamic spine. When it comes to tuning, I go beyond bow tuning and tune the arrow as well.

From: GF
05-Jan-19
Getting the spine right is a great reason to choose a specific length, but I really like to go just long enough to bump the back of my index finger with the blade, just as a draw check.

From: DoorKnob
05-Jan-19
Overdraw.

From: oldgoat
05-Jan-19
Depends on your rest, but most important is it's the right length to tune and at least long enough so that the broadhead doesn't end up hitting the rest whatever kind it is.

From: Native Okie
05-Jan-19
27@ draw and I cut mine to 27 1/4 recently putting the point just at the front edge of the riser.

From: midwest
05-Jan-19
Who digs up these 4 year old threads?

From: joehunter
05-Jan-19

joehunter's embedded Photo
joehunter's embedded Photo
Bunch of you guys must have bows with much longer "actual draw lengths" than you think. Draw length is measured 13/4 inches in front of the pivot point. So if your arrow are the same length as your draw length they should be out in front of your shelf by a wide margin.

From: LostNwoods
05-Jan-19
29.5" draw

Arrows 27.5"

05-Jan-19
27 inch draw. 26 inch arrows. Spine situations in modern compound are irrelevant within reason im my opinion. As long as the shaft is stiff enough. Meaning it’s hard to over spine your bow. So, I know what to shoot but, I’m not going to have a bunch of excess arrow sticking out.

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