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Mapp gas in a camp cook stove-----------
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
mn_archer 09-Mar-15
huntingbob 10-Mar-15
Jaquomo 10-Mar-15
Grubby 10-Mar-15
kellyharris 10-Mar-15
TD 10-Mar-15
kellyharris 10-Mar-15
Jaquomo 11-Mar-15
loesshillsarcher 11-Mar-15
BTM 13-Mar-15
mn_archer 14-Mar-15
kellyharris 14-Mar-15
SanDiegoLife 09-Oct-19
From: mn_archer
09-Mar-15
has anyone ever tried map gas in a colmen type stove? just curious if the hotter gas would boil water faster-

thanks

michael

From: huntingbob
10-Mar-15
Never tried it or even though about it. But you do bring a valid point up. It is costly though.Bob.

From: Jaquomo
10-Mar-15
Interesting... I wonder if the hotter burn would affect the components?

From: Grubby
10-Mar-15
I have run it in my grill because it was all I had, I don't know for sure that my weiners got done quicker but I would say yes. Long term life would likely be compromised.

From: kellyharris
10-Mar-15
Propane temps max Out at 4600 degrees.

Mapp gas temps max out at 5300 degrees.

From: TD
10-Mar-15
I guess it would depend on the components and what their max temp was. Hotter/faster may not cook the best though...

My plumbing torch can take propane or mapp, some (most) torches state propane only. The mapp solders better/faster IMO. Great thing is you can always adjust the mapp down but after a point you can't turn the propane up.

Don't have to change or adjust anything to switch off between the two so I would assume it was mostly the components were rated for higher heat.

Do know a few plumbers that take partial or near empty bottles of mapp home with them from the job. What most do with it I have no idea... but one guy I know uses it to start his BBQ grill....

From: kellyharris
10-Mar-15
Propane temps max Out at 4600 degrees.

Mapp gas temps max out at 5300 degrees.

Here at the brewery I dont know any of us who do any plumbing work (Wet or air) that does not use Map gas.

I would highly recommend contacting the manufacture of the appliance you want to use MAPP gas with.

FYI I believe all that MAPP gas is made of is a mixture of propane and acetoline gas?

TD wrote "Don't have to change or adjust anything to switch off between the two so I would assume it was mostly the components were rated for higher heat."

That (MAY NOT) be true!!!!

One other thing to think of is will the orfice of the appliance be able to use both gases? just because you can use the same tip for each gas when using a torch is not the same as a orfice? You sure as hell dont want to cause back pressure between your bottle and orfice!!!!

When you have a home appliance you have to use a different orfice for both propane or natural gas....

From: Jaquomo
11-Mar-15
You guys are smart. Especially TD, but we already knew that. What about the efficiency at altitude with the lower oxygen?

11-Mar-15
I believe the inuits burned it for those stoves while I was in the arctic.

From: BTM
13-Mar-15
"When you have a home appliance you have to use a different orfice for both propane or natural gas...."

Slightly off-topic, but never hook up a propane bottle to a natural gas appliance. A local man (who'd had his natural gas service shut off due to non-payment) set off his CO detector after doing that. The fire chief warned him to cease, but to no avail. Two weeks later he burned down his house with him inside.

[Insert Darwin reference of your choice here.]

From: mn_archer
14-Mar-15
thanks guys. I may just have to try it with an old stove to see what happens...

michael

From: kellyharris
14-Mar-15
BTM -- You can easily convert a natural gas stove to propane by changing the orfice.

The guy who burned down his home most likely did not switch orfice which caused the liquid propane to gum up in the natural gas orfice and catch fire!!!

From: SanDiegoLife
09-Oct-19
I went camping this weekend and used mapp gas in my two burner propane stove. It worked great. It got very hot, the metal grate was red hot and it boiled water very fast. It seemed to work well. I would guess that over time the metal grate will start to deform from being red hot and having weight on it.

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