Carbon Express Arrows
wild raindeer in the lower 48 who knew
Caribou
Contributors to this thread:
Coyote 65 28-Aug-15
cityhunter 28-Aug-15
Medicinemann 29-Aug-15
5575 29-Aug-15
Ziek 29-Aug-15
writer 29-Aug-15
cityhunter 29-Aug-15
Ziek 29-Aug-15
'Ike' (Phone) 29-Aug-15
Rob in VT 29-Aug-15
DonVathome 30-Aug-15
TD 30-Aug-15
buff 30-Aug-15
tjmitchell 30-Aug-15
Zbone 30-Aug-15
Cheque 30-Aug-15
Rut Nut 30-Aug-15
killinstuff 30-Aug-15
writer 30-Aug-15
Zbone 31-Aug-15
Amoebus 31-Aug-15
killinstuff 31-Aug-15
From: Coyote 65
28-Aug-15

Coyote 65's Link
Did not know there were Raindeer in the lower 48.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/08/29/us-usa-reindeer-idaho-idUSKCN0QY00520150829

From: cityhunter
28-Aug-15
lets hope its not to late

From: Medicinemann
29-Aug-15
Too late....wolves probably got'em.

If there are only 14 animals, there isn't enough genetic diversity for the "herd" to prosper, is there?

From: 5575
29-Aug-15
Um..Mountain Caribou is what they are.

From: Ziek
29-Aug-15
Actually, woodland caribou and and mountain caribou are the same species. More specifically, woodland caribou are divided into two subgroups.

"There are two ecotypes within the Rangifer tarandus caribou, or woodland caribou, subspecies: mountain woodland caribou and northern woodland caribou. This distinction is based largely on habitat use and behavior. Woodland caribou have been reduced to one tiny population in the U.S., in far northern Idaho and northeastern Washington. This population, known as the International Selkirk population, is extremely rare, with only about 40 individuals left. These last caribou in the continental U.S. are a type of woodland caribou known as mountain caribou because they migrate to high alpine peaks in the winter.

Historically, woodland caribou inhabited the forests of the Northern United States from Maine to Washington State, but have been reduced to one small herd in the Selkirk Mountains of northern Idaho, eastern Washington and southern British Columbia. This last U.S. herd is reduced to approximately 40 members that tend to stay mostly in the Canadian part of its range.

From: writer
29-Aug-15
It would be neat if they could bring enough enough from other herds to get this one going.

I know, then some say it wouldn't be conservation.

Maybe the tribe could convince the USFWS that it's within their heritage to shoot wolves from helicopters, or at least to shoot them 365. :-)

From: cityhunter
29-Aug-15
Mike that would be conservation ! putting elk in KY PA thats not conservation that is no different then restocking a pond. They really need to protect these 14 24/7 . or possible capture a few for breeding stock I hope they missed a few dozen out there in there census !!

Maybe the PY can get behind this and fund it ? If the tribe is given money to protect these bou then theirs a chance . Heck why not auction some hunts highest bidder in the name of conservation :<

From: Ziek
29-Aug-15
The problem is the locals. They recreate (snowmobiles are a major problem) and work (logging) in the area, and both would be severely restricted in order to save the herd. Like in many areas where wildlife populations are threatened, there are major conflicts of interest, and many locals want the government to stay out.

29-Aug-15
Well there goes Santa's secret spot, great!

From: Rob in VT
29-Aug-15

Rob in VT's Link
They attempted to reintroduce caribou in Maine in the late 1980's. It failed as most were killed by bears, coyotes, and Bobcats.

From: DonVathome
30-Aug-15
I did not read link but northern Id and Wa have them right?

From: TD
30-Aug-15
14?

Not a problem as long as there are at least 8.....

From: buff
30-Aug-15
I wish I could get $35000 to draw up a conservation plan (I'm not complaining just trying to make a little joke)

From: tjmitchell
30-Aug-15
That 35000 will go for firewater not reindeer. That is not a joke.

From: Zbone
30-Aug-15
Yeah, don't kill and introduced wolf species (IN-troduced because they are not the same subspecies of Lobo that originally existed in the lower 48), but allow these introduced canines to kill or wipeout the native caribou is okay with the wolf crowd... I swear, I don't get it...

I agree with only 14 caribou left, they should be monitored 24x7, and why not bring in new blood from the same subspecies a little further north to strengthen genetics....

From: Cheque
30-Aug-15
Never knew this. Thanks for the heads up!

From: Rut Nut
30-Aug-15
I always thought they were Caribou in N. America and Reindeer in Europe/Scandinavia. But here the terms are used interchangeably?

From: killinstuff
30-Aug-15
They were reintroduced. A habitat specific species that wasn't very successful the first time or in the reintroduction and guys want to protect them 24/7? Why? So there can be 40 of them in 25 years and 10 million dollars later? Because they have antlers or horns some folks put more value on an animals life I've come to learn.

From: writer
30-Aug-15
"That 35000 will go for firewater not reindeer. That is not a joke."

Nope, but to someone with a partial native heritage, and with good friends who are full-blood, college educated and very successful in their lives, it sure reads racist.

OK, killinstuff. How about you get the feds to quit supporting feral horses and donkeys (It's $10,000 per week just for the few herds we have ranchers watching in Kansas) and they we can put that money towards those caribou? :-)

From: Zbone
31-Aug-15
Rut Nut - Caribou and reindeer are the same animal from the same Genus: "Rangier", but different subspecies...

killinstuff - Are you saying these 14 left were originally reintroduced and not from native existing stock???

Personal feeling, if failed reintroduction, heck with it, but if the 14 remaining are native strain, try to save them...

From: Amoebus
31-Aug-15
They very sporadically appear in NE MN from a herd on the Ontario side.

If there were any place on the northern tier states where they could still live (and not get into the politics with people), it would probably be the BWCA -- which is where they historically lived.

From: killinstuff
31-Aug-15
Horses are an invasive species and I'm not a horse fan at all. Feral is feral, I'd have an open season year round on them if I could. The Australians have it right by killing them year round and the French have it right by eating them. But try finding a Interbev Equins here in the states? Maybe Montreal.

  • Sitka Gear