Summit Treestands
A Javelina thread
Hogs
Contributors to this thread:
ELKMAN 15-Feb-16
Bear Track 15-Feb-16
sir misalots 15-Feb-16
Phil/VA 15-Feb-16
WoodMoose 15-Feb-16
WoodMoose 15-Feb-16
Phil/VA 15-Feb-16
Zebrakiller 15-Feb-16
Coyote 65 15-Feb-16
Buffalo1 15-Feb-16
t-roy 15-Feb-16
hunting dad 15-Feb-16
Ermine 15-Feb-16
Ermine 15-Feb-16
Ermine 15-Feb-16
Ermine 15-Feb-16
woodguy65 15-Feb-16
woodguy65 15-Feb-16
woodguy65 15-Feb-16
Chief 419 15-Feb-16
bsbowhunter 15-Feb-16
spike buck 15-Feb-16
BOWUNTR 15-Feb-16
Medicinemann 15-Feb-16
GotBowAz 16-Feb-16
ELKMAN 16-Feb-16
ELKMAN 16-Feb-16
BOWUNTR 16-Feb-16
t-roy 16-Feb-16
GotBowAz 16-Feb-16
ELKMAN 17-Feb-16
ELKMAN 18-Feb-16
ELKMAN 19-Feb-16
BowmanMD 19-Feb-16
BowmanMD 19-Feb-16
BowmanMD 19-Feb-16
BowmanMD 19-Feb-16
BowmanMD 19-Feb-16
BowmanMD 19-Feb-16
ELKMAN 19-Feb-16
ELKMAN 20-Feb-16
t-roy 20-Feb-16
ELKMAN 21-Feb-16
ELKMAN 22-Feb-16
White Falcon 22-Feb-16
White Falcon 22-Feb-16
Medicinemann 23-Feb-16
ELKMAN 24-Feb-16
arctichill 25-Feb-16
ELKMAN 25-Feb-16
ahunter55 25-Feb-16
glass eye 25-Feb-16
ELKMAN 28-Feb-16
Drop tine 28-Feb-16
ELKMAN 29-Feb-16
Phil/VA 29-Feb-16
Mark Watkins 29-Feb-16
Heat 29-Feb-16
ELKMAN 01-Mar-16
Mark Watkins 01-Mar-16
Buffalo1 01-Mar-16
arctichill 02-Mar-16
ELKMAN 03-Mar-16
Buffalo1 03-Mar-16
t-roy 05-Mar-16
Guardian Hunter 06-Mar-16
ELKMAN 06-Mar-16
HEAD DOCTOR 06-Mar-16
HEAD DOCTOR 06-Mar-16
ELKMAN 07-Mar-16
HEAD DOCTOR 07-Mar-16
ELKMAN 08-Mar-16
glass eye 08-Mar-16
Buffalo1 08-Mar-16
HEAD DOCTOR 09-Mar-16
ELKMAN 09-Mar-16
DEC 09-Mar-16
BOWNBIRDHNTR 09-Mar-16
DEC 09-Mar-16
HEAD DOCTOR 11-Mar-16
HEAD DOCTOR 11-Mar-16
ELKMAN 12-Mar-16
Ward's Outfitters 14-Mar-16
arctichill 15-Mar-16
ELKMAN 15-Mar-16
Ward's Outfitters 15-Mar-16
HEAD DOCTOR 18-Mar-16
ELKMAN 18-Mar-16
azarchery 18-Mar-16
wild1 19-Mar-16
arctichill 19-Mar-16
ELKMAN 19-Mar-16
Ward's Outfitters 21-Mar-16
azarchery 22-Mar-16
ELKMAN 23-Mar-16
Ward's Outfitters 23-Mar-16
ELKMAN 24-Mar-16
Ward's Outfitters 31-Mar-16
From: ELKMAN
15-Feb-16
Does anyone have any photos or stories to share about these little desert warriors? Or even better some video? Recipes? Tips in handling? Tactics? Or maybe just some cool desert tidbits or photography!

From: Bear Track
15-Feb-16
They are on my bucket list too.

From: sir misalots
15-Feb-16
no, but there are some videos on the net. I too want to hunt these stink pigs

From: Phil/VA
15-Feb-16

Phil/VA's embedded Photo
Phil/VA's embedded Photo
My First Javelina

It really started in 1998. I had been back in traditional archery a few years and was looking for a new longbow. Searching on the internet I ran across Jeff Massie in Shiner Texas. I liked the looks of his Longhorns and after talking to a few people ordered one. It was 64”, 55lbs at 28”. It had a cocobolo handle with Bamboo lams under clear glass. I received the bow and it shot as good as it looked. After I received the bow I stayed in touch with Jeff and he suggested I come down and hunt pigs and javvies with him. He was running pig and javvie hunts on the Cadena ranch near Benavides. Well, I wasn’t too sure of that as it was a long ways from Virginia to Texas. He finally convinced me and I talked my brother, Lewis, into going. We went down in January of 2000. We didn’t have much luck that year, but both of us took an eating size pig.

We had such a good time that we decided to go back the next year. This time we convinced my brother’s brother-in-law, Jesse, to go. We got down there the 3rd week in January on Sunday afternoon. It was 80 degrees and sunny. When we got up Monday morning it was in the 40’s and misting rain. It stayed that way through the week until Friday when it was in the high 70’s and sunny. We hadn’t had much luck, Jesse and Lewis had each taken a nice pig and a javvie. I had taken an eating size pig and a few rabbits.

On Friday morning I set up in a location called Canopy Road. I hand corned a stretch of the road and settled back to wait. After about half an hour I saw some javvies down near the end of the road. I faded back into the brush and stalked up on the javvie. When I finally got into shooting range, only one of the javvies was still on the road. It was a nice boar about 35lbs. He was quartering slightly away from me with his left side toward me at about 15 yards. I picked a spot and came to anchor and released the string on the first javvie I had ever shot at. The hit looked a bit too far forward for the angle he was at, probably only one lung. I watched him run into a mesquite thicket and settled down to wait a half-hour or so before I started to track.

While I was waiting, another Javvie, about 25 lbs wandered back onto the road. I slowly got to my feet and started a stalk. I stalked to about 20 yards. He started to get fidgety so I decided to shoot. I picked a spot, came to anchor and released the string. I watched as the arrow zipped through him in what looked like a perfect double lung hit. He darted toward the nastiest patch of cactus and mesquite on the ranch. He crashed just outside the thicket and I had my first javvie.

It was now time to track the first javvie. I picked up some good blood and followed it into the mesquite. I followed about 25 yards and had to crawl under some low hanging limbs. I crawled about 10 yards and I heard the javvie popping his teeth. I looked to my left and he was about 10 yards from me facing me. He looked pretty sick, but still very much alive. The overhanging limbs were so low that I couldn’t get off my hands and knees. It looked like a couple yards ahead I could get to my knees so I slowly crawled ahead. I got up on my knees and got ready to shoot. The limbs were too low for me to hold my bow upright so I shot with the bow almost horizontal. He was facing me but I could see his right shoulder. I picked a spot, drew, and released. The arrow sliced into him and it looked like I got one lung. He ran 5 or 6 yards and collapsed. I waited a few minutes and he didn’t move so I crawled up to him. He was dead.

This really hooked me on hunting pigs and javvie in Texas and I’ve been making an annual trip to south Texas ever since.

From: WoodMoose
15-Feb-16

WoodMoose's Link
I've wanted to hunt them since the 70s when I first read about them,,,,no idea why,,,,got one in 2012 while hunting AZ,,,,,and I will definitely do it again,,,

From: WoodMoose
15-Feb-16

WoodMoose's embedded Photo
WoodMoose's embedded Photo
attaching photo (I hope),,,

From: Phil/VA
15-Feb-16

Phil/VA's embedded Photo
Phil/VA's embedded Photo
Another Pic

From: Zebrakiller
15-Feb-16

Zebrakiller's embedded Photo
Zebrakiller's embedded Photo

From: Coyote 65
15-Feb-16
Just took my wife on a hunt this last weekend. Hunt is sponsored by the AZ Game and Fish and CouesWhitetail.com and Safari Club and others and is for women only. They match each woman up with a mentor(experienced) hunter in a HAM hunt near Tucson AZ. HAM is Handgun. Archery, Muzzleloader. Very few pigs were seen, and only one was taken. Hot weather caused them to seek shade early and as this is primarily a spot and stalk type hunt they were in the shade early. She did see one on the way into the camp area. Since she spotted about 50 deer in her 4 day hunt we are going back this fall for deer. Just need to get her 40 yd. pin set up.

She is also going to try and do the Javi hunt next year with the womans only group.

This was her first big game hunt and she had a blast.

Terry

From: Buffalo1
15-Feb-16
I read 5 books about javelina, talked with people on Bowsite who had bowhunted them and watched videos on Youtube about bowhunting javelina videos before I went in January 2016.

I hunted with Rob Kiebler with Fair Chase Limited in Texas. I listen to him and my guide John Boles. They are javelina hunting experts.

A culmination of all of this, I believe greatly lead to my success.

Javelinas are very unusual animals and they are a blast to bowhunt. I want to go again.

From: t-roy
15-Feb-16
I hope to add to this thread in a couple of weeks. Going on my first hog/javi hunt in Tx.

From: hunting dad
15-Feb-16
Here's a tip for when you kill one. Be extra careful while skinning. Do not let hair touch meat, do not touch meat with hand that has touched hair, same with knife. The musk that comes from the gland on the back is very strong. Not getting it on meat really makes a difference at the dinner table.The gland will come off with the hide while skinning. Good luck on your adventure.

From: Ermine
15-Feb-16

Ermine's embedded Photo
Ermine's embedded Photo
My only javalena experience was last year. I hunted Arizona for the 1st time. I got on a high point and spotted a group of javalena. I closed the distance very quick and got within range. They were feeding totally unaware of my presence. I decided to let them get as close as possible before I shot. At one point they were 15 yards.

The biggest of the group was broadside at 30. I shot and the hit looked perfect. He ran over a hill and I picked up the blood trail. Very good blood trail I might add. I followed blood trail to a small hole in the rocks and the boar was inside alive and growling and huffing. I tried getting him to come out but wasn't working. I could only see his mouth and because of how low it was to the ground had to draw my bow Geronimo style (horizontal) and shot the boar right in the face thru the choppers! Instant dead.

The shot was perfect. I was using an expandable and don't know if that what was the deal was or if they are just super tough animals.

From: Ermine
15-Feb-16

Ermine's embedded Photo
Ermine's embedded Photo

From: Ermine
15-Feb-16

Ermine's embedded Photo
Ermine's embedded Photo
Scene of the show down!

From: Ermine
15-Feb-16

Ermine's embedded Photo
Ermine's embedded Photo
I skinned it and quartered it like I do all my animals! It was very good meat!

Javalena are fun to hunt. In my opinion fun but pretty easy to kill. Not too challenging. But a unique critter

From: woodguy65
15-Feb-16

From: woodguy65
15-Feb-16

woodguy65's embedded Photo
woodguy65's embedded Photo

From: woodguy65
15-Feb-16

woodguy65's embedded Photo
woodguy65's embedded Photo

From: Chief 419
15-Feb-16

Chief 419's embedded Photo
Chief 419's embedded Photo
Javelina's are made for stalking and are a great addition to your trophy room. I shot this one down in Old Mexico. The Mexicans seems to enjoy eating them.

I agree with Ermine. They aren't very challenging, but worthy of a stalk or two. Come to think of it, the whitetails in Mexico weren't the smartest animals either. There's almost zero hunting pressure down there.

From: bsbowhunter
15-Feb-16

bsbowhunter's embedded Photo
bsbowhunter's embedded Photo
This one was 5 yards away! of course I had already shot one and my buddy had walked the other direction complaining that he never sees them, lol

From: spike buck
15-Feb-16
I hunted the stinky little things in Hebronville Texas, near Laredo.

When I shot mine I made a mistake and grabbed it by its back. Right where the scent glands were.

Was a lot of fun and would recommend it to anyone!!

From: BOWUNTR
15-Feb-16
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=8Qd7vOp1DTc

Try this.... Ed F

From: Medicinemann
15-Feb-16
Ed,

You sure about that link?

From: GotBowAz
16-Feb-16

GotBowAz's embedded Photo
GotBowAz's embedded Photo
I've killed 9 Javelina's with the bow over the years. they are a lot of fun to hunt and even more fun to watch. Use a mouth wounded rabbit call and get ready for some fast action!

As others have said they are not really that challenging however IMO they are the best spot and stalk critters to start new young bow hunters out on. I started my son out that way, he has killed 2, and my grandson will be doing it next year.

The one on the rock is mine and the other one is my sons. We killed these out of the same herd as I mimicked their wolf grunts less than 5 minutes apart.

From: ELKMAN
16-Feb-16
Awesome guys!

From: ELKMAN
16-Feb-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo

From: BOWUNTR
16-Feb-16

BOWUNTR's Link
For the challenged.... Ed F

From: t-roy
16-Feb-16
I resemble that remark, Ed!

Looks like another reason to look into getting some snake boots!

Hope to give the calling a try in a couple of weeks.

From: GotBowAz
16-Feb-16
Fun stuff huh Ed?

Thats what Im talking about!

Want to laugh so hard you cry? Do that with a first time kid and watch him loose a couple arrows and nearly crap his pants! LOL

From: ELKMAN
17-Feb-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo

From: ELKMAN
18-Feb-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo

From: ELKMAN
19-Feb-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo

From: BowmanMD
19-Feb-16

BowmanMD's embedded Photo
BowmanMD's embedded Photo
One of my favorite animals to hunt with a bow! Only problem is that mine always run for the nearest culvert or cave to die in! This one crawled in from the other side through a real tight, cactus infested space, so I had to go grab a ladder and pull him out the other end. Never boring with javelina!

From: BowmanMD
19-Feb-16

BowmanMD's embedded Photo
BowmanMD's embedded Photo
We went three for four this year (the other guy missed). No caves or culverts to hide in!

From: BowmanMD
19-Feb-16
I make chorizo with mine. This is the first year I did it myself and it turned out great. Had 15# of javelina, mixed it with 15# of pork roast from last summer's hog, threw it all in the grinder and mixed in the A.C. Legg Chorizo Sausage mix. Perfect for breakfast burritos! Not quite as spicy as my previous game processor (WGP in Tucson) made it, but good enough. All this nonsense about javelina not tasting good is just hogwash. Our family loves it! And you can't find a more fun animal to hunt!

From: BowmanMD
19-Feb-16

BowmanMD's embedded Photo
BowmanMD's embedded Photo
Another one from a few years ago. It was a good year--I shot two pigs (different units) and a desert muley in a 36-hour time frame!

From: BowmanMD
19-Feb-16

BowmanMD's embedded Photo
BowmanMD's embedded Photo
My then 12yo son's first pig. Best animal around to get kids excited about bow hunting.

From: BowmanMD
19-Feb-16

BowmanMD's embedded Photo
BowmanMD's embedded Photo

From: ELKMAN
19-Feb-16
Very cool!

From: ELKMAN
20-Feb-16
Ermine- One thing to remember on these little guys is that their vitals are low and forward. I agree the meat is very under rated. Hunting Dad brings up a very important tip in handling. Be SURE you use one set of gloves to skin being careful to keep hair from touching meat, and then use a new set for handling the meat itself. An average Cactus Bounder will fit into four 1 gallon ziplock bags. Three for the boned meat, and one for the skull, all easily slipped into almost any day pack and leaving the rest for nature to consume. Love the culvert photo Bowman! Good stuff guys!

From: t-roy
20-Feb-16
BowmanMD

Looks like I'm going to have to get a bigger daypack!!!

From: ELKMAN
21-Feb-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo
My buddy Steve's prickle pig...

From: ELKMAN
22-Feb-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo
The Wife's Cactus warrior...

From: White Falcon
22-Feb-16

White Falcon's embedded Photo
White Falcon's embedded Photo
Texas!

From: White Falcon
22-Feb-16

White Falcon's embedded Photo
White Falcon's embedded Photo

From: Medicinemann
23-Feb-16
Cactus bounder, Prickle pig, Cactus warrior.....I am getting a chuckle out of the nicknames for this critter.....

From: ELKMAN
24-Feb-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo
And here's my awesome little desert dweller... ;-)

From: arctichill
25-Feb-16

arctichill's embedded Photo
arctichill's embedded Photo
Mine from earlier this month. Love the beautiful desert habitat they occupy!

From: ELKMAN
25-Feb-16
I really love that photo! Is that rooting in the back ground from him?

From: ahunter55
25-Feb-16
Any reasonable priced places in Tx. for Archery in April, May.

From: glass eye
25-Feb-16

glass eye's embedded Photo
glass eye's embedded Photo
Never seemed to get any good field pics of javelin.

From: ELKMAN
28-Feb-16
That's a pretty cool mount!

From: Drop tine
28-Feb-16
Those hunts look like a lot of fun. Any suggestions on outfits to do a free range hunt? Maybe in combination with a Coues?

From: ELKMAN
29-Feb-16
I would do AZ. The Texas "hunting" is not a true representation of the Javelina. You can do it DIY very easily, and all the areas around Tuscon are very good populations...

From: Phil/VA
29-Feb-16
I would like to do an Arizona javelina hunt someday. Actually west Texas has some good spot and stalk hunting. I usually hunt south Texas, which is not very conducive to spot and stalk, but I have had some success spot and stalk hunting on the prickly pear flats. I like to corn the roads and wait for the javelin to come to the road, then I stalk them. One of the reasons I like south Texas is because of the ease of combining hogs with the javelina.

From: Mark Watkins
29-Feb-16
Great pics, stories and thread!!!

Mark

From: Heat
29-Feb-16
Great stuff guys! That double pedestal mount right there is the best open mouth javelina mount I've seen. I generally really prefer the closed mouth mounts I've seen.

From: ELKMAN
01-Mar-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo

From: Mark Watkins
01-Mar-16
Great looking mount Casey!

Mark

From: Buffalo1
01-Mar-16
ELKMAN,

What is this comment about, "The Texas "hunting" is not a true representation of the Javelina" ?

My research indicated that the javelina or collared peccary ,(family Tayassuidae; suborder Suina) is found in the United States in the states of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.

From: arctichill
02-Mar-16
Elkman,

That is rooting. When I spotted the group they had their heads buried deep into the side of a barrel cactus as they devoured it.

From: ELKMAN
03-Mar-16
Buffalo- Was just referring to how easy they are to "kill" when you are baiting them. Not a fair representation of how they are to actually have to find, and "HUNT" them on public land...

From: Buffalo1
03-Mar-16
ELKMAN

Understand what you are saying and agree.

From: t-roy
05-Mar-16

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
My first Javi.

4 of them came in & I shot the biggest one. I hit him in the spine & he went down & went to snarling & raising cain. The other ones jumped all over him & then ran out into the brush. I called them back in 6 different times with my varmint call similar to what was on the video that Ed F. posted!

What an absolute blast! Just wished that I had videoed it!

06-Mar-16
Where do we go that is reasonably priced? Thoughts!

From: ELKMAN
06-Mar-16
Arizona tags are around $225 if I'm remembering right. The desert is free as long as you have a tent, but there are plenty of Motels on the outskirts of Tuscon that are reasonable.

From: HEAD DOCTOR
06-Mar-16

HEAD DOCTOR's embedded Photo
HEAD DOCTOR's embedded Photo
Here are a couple of Javelina I harvested.The first one was taken in January 2016. It weighed 63 pounds field dressed (sow). The second I harvested in the 2016 Ham hunt and it weighed 50 pounds field dressed.(Boar)

From: HEAD DOCTOR
06-Mar-16

HEAD DOCTOR's embedded Photo
HEAD DOCTOR's embedded Photo
The above photo is the 50 #. This is the 63 #

From: ELKMAN
07-Mar-16
What state is that?

From: HEAD DOCTOR
07-Mar-16
Arizona!

From: ELKMAN
08-Mar-16
Wow! I see NOTHING in the back ground? No cactus? No Rock? What the hell were they doing out there? What were they eating?

From: glass eye
08-Mar-16
ELKMAN...... AZ has some ag land and that's what it looks like to me. I've seen javelina feeding in corn fields there.

From: Buffalo1
08-Mar-16
HEAD DOCTOR that 63# boar is a real beast. What is the skull measurement on that animal

What is the skull measurement on the 53# sow? Very large size for a sow.

Really nice animals. Congrats !!

From: HEAD DOCTOR
09-Mar-16
The 63# is a sow and the 50# is a boar. Have not measured the skulls yet but I have some skulls in the Bowhunting in Arizona record book that were taken with a Vertical bow when I could shoot one that score 14.10 14.11 and 14.12 inches. These should score in the mid 14's. The sows are generally heavier than the boars. They don't have to keep up with 10 girl friends like the boar does. They mate all year long.

From: ELKMAN
09-Mar-16
Very cool. How did you get close in that stuff?

From: DEC
09-Mar-16
I killed one back in 2005 in south Texas. Probably one of the most fun spot and stalk hunts there is. Fun critters.

From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
09-Mar-16
HD, is that a 100 gr Vortex head in that top picture? I have a picture taken by Dennis Ward of myself with a javelina that looks very similar!

From: DEC
09-Mar-16

DEC's embedded Photo
DEC's embedded Photo
LOL ... for some reason it loaded the wrong image from my computer ... sorry guys.

From: HEAD DOCTOR
11-Mar-16

HEAD DOCTOR's embedded Photo
HEAD DOCTOR's embedded Photo
ELKMAN, WHERE THE ANIMAL IS KILLED IS NOT ALWAYS WHERE THE PICTURE IS TAKEN. I don't always tell people where I am hunting...but when I do, I am usually lieing. BOWNBIRDHNTR. Yes that is a 100 grain Vortex. Dennis Ward...I know him very well. I see him in the mirror everyday. Attached is a picture of my grand daughter's 65# javelina.

From: HEAD DOCTOR
11-Mar-16

HEAD DOCTOR's embedded Photo
HEAD DOCTOR's embedded Photo
Here is what it is all about! Landon Ward first big game kill. A 58# javelina. I have a full mount of the heaviest javelina I have ever seen.It was an archery kill about 15 years ago. It was weighed on a certified scale at a meat packing plant. The skull was I believe 14.5 inches.

From: ELKMAN
12-Mar-16
Those are some awesome Javies! Congrats! BTW: I didn't ask WHERE you hunt, just asked HOW you got close in that terrain. A more congenial answer might sound something like this: Photos weren't necessarily taken at the sight of the kill. Again tell the kids congratulations!

14-Mar-16
Elkman

Most of the Big Javelina we kill, we have them patterned and set up on them. Its nearly impossible to stalk the flat land pigs in the open terrain.

From: arctichill
15-Mar-16
Ward's,

How is it nearly impossible to stalk flat land pigs? Bowhunters can effectively stalk flatland pronghorns [not with great success, but with some very limited success]. The very rare/limited success on flat land pronghorns is exponentially more difficult than stalking javelina in the flat lands. For that reason, I cannot understand how stalking javies could be "nearly impossible" regardless of terrain? In my experience, the most difficult part of javelina hunting is finding them. Once found, the stalk has always been less challenging. For that reason, hunting javies in open country would seem easier to me than looking for them in the dense underbrush where I seem to find them.

From: ELKMAN
15-Mar-16
I'm sure both have their challenges and rewards. Post some Pork Pics!

15-Mar-16
arctichill

I know a bit about spotting and stalking i've harvested 6 antelope with my bow all spot and stalk. as for these Javies they are not your common javie, they are very spooky, see better than normal javies and are pressured 365 days a year by farmers and ranchers.

From: HEAD DOCTOR
18-Mar-16
Most of the time these Javs are nocturnal, due to the pressure. They are more visible during the early morning and late late evening but during the colder months of January and Feruary, when the night time temperatures are in the teens, they feed when the sun is out. They don't have hair they have bristles.

From: ELKMAN
18-Mar-16

ELKMAN's embedded Photo
ELKMAN's embedded Photo

From: azarchery
18-Mar-16
Most of the time ALL Javies are nocturnal. They must be eating the farmers carrots if they see better then your average pigs:)

From: wild1
19-Mar-16

wild1's embedded Photo
wild1's embedded Photo

From: arctichill
19-Mar-16
Ward's Outfitters,

Congrats on the spot and stalk pronghorns! I truly believe that is one of the more difficult feats in bowhunting. I've not yet been successful in killing a pronghorn with my bown by spot/stalk. I don't mean to sound argumentative. I hunt public land javies that get a ton of pressure also. In my experience, the most difficult part of the hunt is locating the javelina. They can be super hard to find for sure. Once I find them though, a well planned stalk seems to be noticeably easier than that of other North American game. Again, that's just my experience hunting javies in SW New Mexico.

From: ELKMAN
19-Mar-16
Agreed they are definitely harder to find than to actually kill, but boy they can be hard to find some years, and near impossible in lower population areas that you have no experience in... Post some New Mexico piggy pics!

21-Mar-16
Arctichill Thank you , I really enjoy Antelope hunting , but crap getting a tag in Az and New mexico is tuff these days, I really don't find locating Javies difficult at all. Food Cover Water = pigs. Azarchery I would strongly disagree about pigs being nocturnal, on cold nights they stay bedded and move just about all day only napping occasionally. when hunters cant find them its normally because they are in thick brush, only coming into open areas in the late evening.

From: azarchery
22-Mar-16
On cold nights, yes they will bed down. But they are nocturnal most of the time. Especially when the temps warm up.

From: ELKMAN
23-Mar-16
I would have to agree with AZarcher as far as them being primarily nocturnal as a species, and I will agree with WardsOutfitter that they are very easily located on private land, in agricultural wide open fields with no cover... LOL!

23-Mar-16
Elkman seriously 99% of the javelina we and clients harvest are on public grounds, I guess i just don't have a hard time locating them because i'm better than you at it ? LOL

From: ELKMAN
24-Mar-16
Sorry Steve: That was a Type-o. That was directed towards people hunting them in that agricultural private ground. (And I have no doubt you are the greatest of all time...) LMAO!

31-Mar-16
Elkman

LMAO.. Yes we can laugh about this, were both adults, sometimes these threads catch me in a bad mood :)

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