Summit Treestands
Angle Compensation Table
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Bou'bound 08-Jun-16
ben h 08-Jun-16
Medicinemann 08-Jun-16
Fitzbow 08-Jun-16
Bowboy 08-Jun-16
Bou'bound 08-Jun-16
nvgoat 09-Jun-16
APauls 09-Jun-16
Uriah21 30-Aug-21
Matt 30-Aug-21
Rocky D 30-Aug-21
Kurt 30-Aug-21
SBH 30-Aug-21
Will 30-Aug-21
sticksender 30-Aug-21
Kurt 30-Aug-21
From: Bou'bound
08-Jun-16
Does anyone have an example of a simple angle compensation table for normal bow shot scenarios.

My rangefinder (Leica) does not have that functionality. I normally don't need it, but for one trip may. I am not going to buy a new rangefinder for one time use so a chart would be helpful.

PS - unless anyone has a spare angle compensating model in a top drawer somewhere and wants to rent it out for a couple months!

From: ben h
08-Jun-16

ben h's embedded Photo
ben h's embedded Photo
Here is mine. If you want to make your own, all you need to do is take your measured yards and multiply that by the Cosine of the angle. Good luck on your trip! If you want, shoot me a PM and I'll e-mail you my excel file and you can change the angles or yards to whatever you want.

From: Medicinemann
08-Jun-16
Bou',

I have a clinometer if you want to borrow it. Heck, for that matter, depending on the dates of your hunt, you can just borrow one of my angle correcting rangefinders.....

From: Fitzbow
08-Jun-16
Grant, what are we going after on is hunt if you don't mind me asking. Good luck to you also.

From: Bowboy
08-Jun-16
Mountain Goat!

From: Bou'bound
08-Jun-16
yes goat

thanks Jake, let me see what happens

From: nvgoat
09-Jun-16
Back in the Ice Age- before angle compensating rangefinders, my buddy and I came up with a simple approach that was pretty accurate and fast.

30 degree angle shoot .9 or 90% of the measured distance (cosine 30 = .87. Rangefinder says 50 you shoot 45 (50X.9).

45 degree angle shoot .7 or 70% of the measured distance (cosine 45 = .71) Rangefinder says 50 you shoot 35 (50X.70)

60 degree angle shoot .5 or 50% of the measured distance (cosine 60 =.5) Rangefinder says 50 you shoot 25 (50X.5)

Go practice it and you will find that it works very well. In between distances you can split the difference between these numbers.

That said, I would never go back to using a non angle compensating rangefinder.

From: APauls
09-Jun-16
My problem is I always ask myself questions like: "Given the cost of the hunt, what would I be williing to pay in hindsight to be able to retake the shot I missed because it happened fast, I'm not used to calculating angles and I didn't have the angle compensating rangefinder?"

...and I end up with gear.

From: Uriah21
30-Aug-21
Honestly, speaking I was in a fix pertaining to this table, I never thought that it could be very easy to create after your tutorial. I will buy essay online safe to complete my pending assignments. I will share this procedure with my friends so that they could create tables like this.

From: Matt
30-Aug-21
Sell the Leica and buy something that is full-featured or borrow an angle-compensating RF from someone. Dicking with a table during the moment of truth is a recipe for disaster.

From: Rocky D
30-Aug-21

From: Kurt
30-Aug-21
Goats are likely to be arrowed at severe angles. I wouldn’t go without an angle compensating rangefinder if you are a pin shooter.

But even more important is practicing steep downhill shots. My shooting is about 3/4 as good on steep down shots as on the flat….based on years of practice on the mountain behind the house. Bend at the waist helps, but your platform…footing is rough and it it makes a difference. Tree stands giving you a perfectly flat spot to stand aren’t near as tough.

Good luck!

From: SBH
30-Aug-21
Borrow Jakes or buy a new one. Why risk it?

From: Will
30-Aug-21
Thanks for the table and comments. This data is great

From: sticksender
30-Aug-21
I realize this thread is 5 years old.....but in any case, that table is fine I guess, but who believes they'd be able to accurately estimate the shot angle, then check the linear range, then look up that linear range on the table, then read off the compensated range, then twirl your slider or pick a pin, and then make the shot? Honestly if you're a bowhunter regularly doing mountain hunts, an angle-compensated range finder or binoculars are pretty much a must-have.

From: Kurt
30-Aug-21
Looks like Uriah has infiltrated BS to sell his wares. Good catch on the old thread.

So did ‘bou get the goat?

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