Mathews Inc.
Fanny pack vs. daypack
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
DonVathome 14-Nov-16
elkstabber 14-Nov-16
Glunt@work 14-Nov-16
GotBowAz 14-Nov-16
ASCTLC 14-Nov-16
wyobullshooter 14-Nov-16
TD 14-Nov-16
APauls 14-Nov-16
Elkaddict 14-Nov-16
fawn 14-Nov-16
WV Mountaineer 14-Nov-16
Glunt@work 14-Nov-16
STILLHUNTER 14-Nov-16
TD 15-Nov-16
WapitiBob 15-Nov-16
Coccon Man 15-Nov-16
BULELK1 15-Nov-16
elkstabber 15-Nov-16
standswittaknife 15-Nov-16
ElkNut1 15-Nov-16
bigeasygator 15-Nov-16
Ridge Ghost 15-Nov-16
Cheesehead Mike 17-Nov-16
Mark Watkins 17-Nov-16
Rut Nut 17-Nov-16
cnelk 17-Nov-16
Devilfan 18-Nov-16
DonVathome 18-Nov-16
Cheesehead Mike 18-Nov-16
Devilfan 18-Nov-16
Scoot 18-Nov-16
oldgoat 18-Nov-16
willliamtell 18-Nov-16
wyliecoyote 18-Nov-16
Ron Niziolek 18-Nov-16
Elkhuntr 18-Nov-16
Backpack Hunter 19-Nov-16
Cheesehead Mike 22-Nov-16
IdyllwildArcher 22-Nov-16
willliamtell 22-Nov-16
IdyllwildArcher 22-Nov-16
BrownMan 22-Mar-19
wyliecoyote 22-Mar-19
IdyllwildArcher 22-Mar-19
DanaC 22-Mar-19
hawkeye in PA 22-Mar-19
cnelk 22-Mar-19
LINK 22-Mar-19
Ucsdryder 22-Mar-19
Jaquomo 22-Mar-19
12yards 22-Mar-19
Mule Power 22-Mar-19
elkmtngear 22-Mar-19
Dyjack 23-Mar-19
DanaC 23-Mar-19
BTM 23-Mar-19
wild1 23-Mar-19
Jaquomo 23-Mar-19
c3 24-Mar-19
BrownMan 26-Mar-19
LINK 26-Mar-19
Jaquomo 26-Mar-19
From: DonVathome
14-Nov-16
Anyone ever use a fanny pack instead of a backpack? Buddy has no daypack so he is debating it.

From: elkstabber
14-Nov-16
All the time in early season with warm weather. I try to keep it around 10-12 pounds including 2-3 L of water.

From: Glunt@work
14-Nov-16
I use a big fanny pack with shoulder straps, Badlands Monster.

From: GotBowAz
14-Nov-16
I've used both and they both have their likes and dislikes. Biggest downfall to a fanny pack is they dont hold as much and i use mine to board aircraft and stuff under the seat in front of me. Fanny packs tend to keep you cooler in warm weather though.

From: ASCTLC
14-Nov-16
I use a combination pack that has the hydration bladder back part connected to the fanny pack lower part. I like that style versus everything carried only on my back or everything carried only at my waist.

14-Nov-16
Never. Every time I step into the elk woods I do so with the sole purpose of killing an elk. There's no chance I could carry everything I need to break down, bag, and hang an elk in a fanny pack. Not to mention the fact I may have to spend a night in those woods. I gladly sacrifice a few pounds for the confidence that I have everything I need to safely and efficiently hunt elk right there on my back.

From: TD
14-Nov-16
How far from the roads is he hunting?

I like a pack you can at least take out a decent first load of meat. I hate wasting a trip out if you're in a couple hours or more. Plus I can carry what I need if I have to stay out a night for what ever reason. If close to a road then it becomes less an issue.

From: APauls
14-Nov-16
Nope, same I would never want to walk a couple extra hours knowing I've got like 13 hours of packing ahead of me...

From: Elkaddict
14-Nov-16
I gotta disagree Rob. Plenty of room for a kill kit, food water, rain gear, and everything one needs for a day hunt. I've done it many times, and know other guys who do as well. It's not convenient for trying to pack a load out though.

From: fawn
14-Nov-16
I use a fanny pack attached to my Coleman Peak 1 frame. It helps distribute the weight over hips and shoulders. The frame is small enough to shoot unobstructed while wearing as well as travel through some tight spots without being hung up. To top it off, the frame will carry at least one bone in hind quarter or both fronts, the first trip out. I carry two 1" nylon straps that go through the holes built into the frames, to tie the quarter down. Once strapped on, it will stay secure all the way out. I've taken a couple dozen elk out this way and I am still using the original frame and fanny pack.

14-Nov-16
Tell your buddy to check out a Nimrod Wilderness pack.

I own some internal and external frame packs. Some were designed for long stays and others are day hunters with the ability to carry out meat. I have used those several times and, they do a wonderful job. But, they heat up the back when hunting. A fanny pack is a lot cooler and, will carry everything I need, minus the meat out on a deer hunt. Or, the first load on a western elk hunt.

Enter the Nimrod. It is a fanny pack with stow-able frame and deployable game bag. It ain't cheap. But, it works and works well. It is large enough for a days worth of water, food, extra clothes, etc... . But, not so large it surpasses the convenience of a fanny pack.

When you kill something, assemble the frame inside the game bad and attach to harness and fanny pack by a color coded system of buckles. Easy Peasy. And, it will carry a big load. I use it for deer hunting here when I plan on packing versus dragging. I have carried a completely boned out deer, horns, and my gear in it numerous times. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 45-50 pounds with no problems. Some of them were for several miles and a couple thousand foot in elevation. So, rest assured it will do the job.

Like I said before, they are NOT cheap. That's the only draw back. So, you had better be fanny pack guy and, be sure it is what you want. Because the resale market on mid to upper $300 fanny packs is a small one. God Bless

From: Glunt@work
14-Nov-16
I get all the normal stuff including 4 cheapo game bags, rope and survival gear in my fanny pack. Its not good for taking a load out but I manage to get a head or some meat out on the way to grab the real packs. I tried hunting with several daypacks and it just never suited me. I do rifle hunt with a Eberlestock X1 but that carries the rifle as well.

From: STILLHUNTER
14-Nov-16
I have always used a Badland Monster fannypack and can easily carry everything I need for a day hunt and what I need to take care of an elk. I have noticed that a lot of elk hunters pack twice as much stuff as they really need. I've tried a daypack on occasion and much prefer the lightweight and simplicity of a fannypack.

From: TD
15-Nov-16
That begs the question.... who/what is packing out your elk? Ever stay out overnight with what is in a fanny pack? If it starts snowing? Sideways weather? First aid kit? Kill kit? No way prepared for anything IMO.... a GOOD frame pack is as comfortable as any day/fanny pack and will carry 20-25 lbs better than a day/fanny pack will carry 10-15. i.e. you will notice the fanny pack weight more than I will with near twice a much.

Maybe more with a Hello Kitty.... heheheheheh.....

From: WapitiBob
15-Nov-16

WapitiBob's embedded Photo
WapitiBob's embedded Photo
A whole bunch of us grew up hunting Elk with a real fanny pack. The first quarter came out over one shoulder. Wasn't much fun but that's how it was done. It'll still do the job today if that's how you want to do it.

From: Coccon Man
15-Nov-16
I don't hunt elk with it but you might want to look at an ALPS big bear fanny pack. It has shoulder straps like a backpack, a lumbar pad and it converts to a daypack via a upper portion that is stowed(zipped) in the fanny packs top lid. It comes up on camofire on occasion.

From: BULELK1
15-Nov-16
I haven't worn a fanny pack in years.

I always have the same back pack on year round as it has everything I would need from fire starter/first aid kit to knives, game bags GPS ect.

No matter if I am just out on training/conditioning hikes winter thru summer to fall hunting.

Good luck, Robb

From: elkstabber
15-Nov-16
I prefer the fanny pack because it's cooler in warm weather and it carries all that I need. With a day's food, packable rain gear, game bags, knife, water purifier, 2-3L of water, and everything I need to day hunt it weighs less than 12 lbs. I'm using a Cabela's pack with 1,300 cubic inches. I haven't had to yet but I could spend an overnight if the weather wasn't too cold.

I carry out a light first load by tying it to the shoulder straps. The first meat load might weigh 20-30 pounds. Then I'll pack the rest with a real packframe.

15-Nov-16
I have learned from many elk kills that I will no longer (ever) carry a pack that won't allow me to get a load of meat out on the first pack back to the vehicle. Most the time, where I hunt usually, the elk is at least a mile from a road system and saving an entire trip by packing out a front and a loin saves an entire walk back in and out. Though good packs that allow that are typically more expensive but if your going to be elk hunting year in and out they are well worth the money. I carry an Exo Mountain 5500 that weighs next to nothing and on day hunts can be cinched down to make is a great day pack. The meat shelf system has worked flawlessly and I actually used it for moose this year in Alaska. I'd save your money and look into Exo Mountain, Kifaru, or Kuiu packs. (not necessarily in that order)

From: ElkNut1
15-Nov-16
Yep, I too opt for a light-weight pack over a fanny pack. This allows me to be versatile, light & haul my bow on my pack instead of in my hands on walking in & out as needed. With this pack under 4# empty it's easy to maneuver yet can easily haul 100# loads. In day pack mode with 80.oz of water, food, bags & all I need for all day my pack is 13#-14# -- this includes the things I need to break down & haul out my elk. I use the Exo 3500 Pack. Best pack I've ever used! I also have the Exo K2.

ElkNut1

From: bigeasygator
15-Nov-16
Depends on where you're hunting in my opinion. I've switched to a fanny pack for the unit I hunt in NM because the terrain is relatively easy and I'm usually never much more than a mile from the truck. The fanny pack is cooler and less bulky than my day packs, and I can fit most of what I need in it or strapped to the outside.

Other areas I've hunted that are more rugged or I hunt further from the truck I'll stick with the day pack and the ability to carry more gear, as well as a load of meat if I'm lucky enough.

It all depends on the situation. They each have a place in my opinion.

From: Ridge Ghost
15-Nov-16
As others have mentioned, I always want to pack the first load of meat out on my way back from a kill. Doing a round-trip with no meat just to get the pack frame is a waste of time and miles in my opinion. I always hunt with a backpack that's capable of hauling a load.

17-Nov-16

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo

Cheesehead Mike's Link
Sometimes I use a fanny pack, Sometimes I use a very light daypack (Badlands Stealth which has been on Camofire lately) and sometimes I use a more substantial day pack like the Badlands 2200. It just depends on the hunt.

I also have the Badlands Monster fanny pack and I like it but I rarely use it because it's not big enough for my needs. My "go to" waist pack it the Timber Hawk Gut Hook, which I'm wearing in this photo, also see my link. It has several pockets, an expandable panel and the ability to lash quite a bit to it. It has enough room for everything necessary to break down an elk and for extra clothes and Space Rain raingear. I really like it but I'll admit I use it more for treestand whitetail hunting than elk hunting.

I know I'll probably be criticized for this and I realize that it's not legal in some states but sometimes just the head and antlers and maybe the backstraps and ternderloins comes out in the first load and then I go back with a bigger pack and pack out the rest of the meat. Usually I'm not in that big of a hurry at that point and I take my time to save wear and tear on my body.

From: Mark Watkins
17-Nov-16
But a fanny pack makes my butt look big.....:)

Mark

From: Rut Nut
17-Nov-16
I use an oversized fannypack like Cheesehead mike's. Been using it year-round ever since I started using a climbing treestand. I like it because it keeps you cooler when moving and you can strap it right around the tree when you get to height and have everything right there next to you(and accessible). Mine has straps on top where you can strap your jacket if you don't want to wear it for walking. When using a climber, I strap it inside the stand when I walk in and out. Works so good I doubt I will ever use anything else!

From: cnelk
17-Nov-16
Just like boots, the type of hunt I do on a particular day depends on the pack I wear.

Fanny pack sometime, daypack sometimes, full loaded frame pack sometimes.

From: Devilfan
18-Nov-16
Cheesehead Mike, Is the Guthook that much bigger than the Badlands Monster. The Badlands actually has more storage capacity than the Guthook. 1100 vs. 924 cubic inches. What do you like better about it?

From: DonVathome
18-Nov-16
Interesting I was expecting everyone to say no, I never have - not even really sure why! I carry minimal gear even when hiking miles - for that exact reason (weight). I bet my fanny pack weighs under 10# total including pack, a snack and some water. This hunt is clsoe to vehicles but late season so cold. He has a crappy backpack and is not looking to spend $$$$ I have a good fanny pack I will lend him and I will use my pack (badlands).

I do not hunt with a pack capable of packing meat, hate it. To big, I love to be light, cook and travel (Sept.). I am usually backpacked in so main pack is not far. I hunt in basically shoes to, very light.

Thanks guys!

18-Nov-16
Devilfan,

Yes, I looked at the specs on both and I see that the capacity of the Monster is actually more than the Guthook. I never would have guessed that based on using both of them.

I think what I like so much about the Guthook is the ability for it to expand and to strap additional clothes to the top using the 3 straps that run across the top. The Monster only has one strap that runs along the top (left to right) and doesn't allow you to strap additional clothes to the top like the Guthook does.

If I remember correctly, I like the rectangular main compartments on the Guthook better than the main compartment on the Monster that kind of wraps around your body.

The rear panel on the Guthook is really nice too for carrying bulky items like rattling antlers, etc.

If I get time I'll do a side by side comparison and post some photos...

From: Devilfan
18-Nov-16
Thanks, Mike. That would be great if you get a chance to do the comparison. I was actually think about a waist pack with shoulder straps. I have a small backpack now, but the problem is the main compartment is pretty small. I have a long way to my spots and have to lash all my clothes to the pack. It makes it pretty awkward with the way the weight is distributed. It's ok for the early season when I don't bring much, but it might be a better option for later. Also considering just getting a bigger backpack. I'd much rather have one big compartment than a bunch of smaller ones.

From: Scoot
18-Nov-16
"But a fanny pack makes my butt look big.....:)"

Mark, my butt makes my butt look big! After Thanksgiving break that'll be especially the case!

I have a fanny pack that is the same as the one Mike mentioned above and it's nice. I've used it very little, but it's still a good one when I make use of it.

From: oldgoat
18-Nov-16
I won't even go in with just a daypack anymore! We have enough stuff to take care of an elk, get a load out and spend a no frills night away from camp if need be!

From: willliamtell
18-Nov-16
Love fanny packs and have been using them for decades. I can slither through tight quarters much better than with a pack because they ride low enough to get under things much better. They also keep my back ventilated MUCH better, a not inconsiderable deal when you are doing major climbs and/or are hauling bootie to get on animals some distance away. Also keeps the center of gravity lower. Will acknowledge there are several drawbacks. On backpack hunts there isn't an easy way to carry one in in addition to the pack. Wish a pack company would design a large-volume fannypack as a backpack lid. Also, as noted they don't seem to like carrying more than 10-15 lbs or so. Deer and pigs I usually fireman carry the hind end for the first load so it's not that big a deal - blood and guts are part of the fun. Elk I carry the head/cape the same way. Within the comfy weight limit I can take everything I need to eat, keep hydrated, survive overnight, break an animal down, etc. If I am spike camping for elk I will opt for a medium volume pack to maximize mobility and minimize extra weight/trips.

From: wyliecoyote
18-Nov-16
I am on Cocoons side...the Alps Big bear is a great compromise...a good sized fanny pack and the ability to pull it into a 1700 ci full on pack in seconds when needed....if that isn't big enough...look at the Alps Pathfinder , same design but even bigger. Price of both is really affordable and the quality is great!!....If I was going to buy just a fanny pack and wanted decent cargo space, the Badlands Monster is awesome....Rocky Mountain Packs also makes a combo called the Big Horn ($110) but I have not seen or tried it out. Blacks Creek makes about the biggest fanny pack I have ever seen ($300) called the "Cure".......lots of choices !!

From: Ron Niziolek
18-Nov-16
My style is that of Wyobullshooter. Sitka Flash20 pack carries everything I need. I don't go overboard and carry too much like some, but I will say that having been stuck out overnight the last two years, once on a sheep hunt in October and once on an elk hunt in late September, I was grateful for the few "extras" that would not have made it into a fanny pack. 30 years ago a fanny pack is all I used. Now I like to be a little more prepared.

From: Elkhuntr
18-Nov-16
I used a fanny pack with shoulder straps for many years. i prefer a fanny over a larger pack that rides up near my shoulders. I guess it was about 1500 cu. in. I have a take down pack frame, that I lashed to the top. it was not the most comfy and best pack frame but, I packed elk with it until I got to the truck or camp, and then got my bull pac.

19-Nov-16
Much prefer a backpack to a fanny pack. Never have liked wasting the time and energy to get to a good pack to carry meat out.....or trying to make do with an inferior pack on the first trip.

22-Nov-16
That's a good thing Backpack Hunter because I don't know if you'd get any respect if your handle was "Fannypack Hunter" LOL!

22-Nov-16
cnelk +1

The main advantage of the fanny pack is that they're so much cooler (temp) than a backpack. So I mainly use one for hunts when it's going to hit 70 degrees or more. If I'm going to be relatively close to the truck, say, a mile or so, IMO, it's not a big deal to run back for a pack. Many deer and turkey hunts in Cali require you hunt in daytime temps of 80 degrees or more and the trek is much more comfortable in a fanny than a backpack. A turkey I can throw over my shoulder. A deer I can come back for since it's only one trip out with a full-sized pack.

Elk hunting is another thing. I have hunted with a fanny during elk season and there are trade-offs. The main thing is that you can't throw a ham in a fanny. I really like fawn's setup...that's a really good idea.

That said, I've started gravitating more towards the backpack for elk hunting after having to make that extra trip. It's really about making your first trek out with meat on your back and has nothing to do with preparedness for me. I feel I can get everything in my fanny that I need when I have a reliable weather forcast, which is something I watch very carefully while hunting.

If there's a high pressure system over the Rockies and the forcast is for 70 degrees for the next 5 days and 10% chance of T-storms, then I know I'm ok and don't have to bring as much. If there's a storm in the area and the forcast is for 40%+ chance of rain or snow, then you know you've got to bring more stuff. Weather does change in the mountains rapidly and strange things happen, but you have to know where you are and what's possible in your area, and how far you are from getting out if need be. You also have to check weather.gov daily to really know what's up. Additionally, there's a huge difference between Sept 1st and Oct 1st. If any of those things are in question, it changes everything and you have to plan accordingly.

From: willliamtell
22-Nov-16
To deal with serious weather and serious weather swings, sometimes I'll bring a waterproof stuffsack on top of the fanny lid. Nobody makes the straps there long enough (another change I'd do if I was making them), but it's easy enough to lash onto the compression straps. Idyll, I'm like you - got into the habit in CA's high temp deer seasons etc. If it's t-shirt/short-sleeved shirt weather you do not want a big hot sweat pad across your entire back. Don't know why fanny's don't come with open mesh shoulder straps across the back (another change), or lashing points on the back part of those straps. if there was a way to keep a quarter tied up high on the back shoulder straps it would take away a lot of the load advantage a pack has. Love to figure out a load lifter that would transfer most of the weight to the hip pad, but break down when you're not using it. And face it, most of the time we aren't carrying critter.

22-Nov-16
I use the Badlands fanny that doesn't have shoulder straps. IMO, if I'm going to give up a backpack, I don't even want shoulder straps. The one I use is smaller than the one with straps, but I can still get everything I need into it. It won't fit rain gear, but I rarely bring rain gear and opt for the elk mountain umbrella instead -otherwise I'm wearing my rain gear.

From: BrownMan
22-Mar-19
I prefer backpack , much bigger . You may could it all in one backpack.

From: wyliecoyote
22-Mar-19
I have bought a few fanny packs and love the way they feel especially with shoulder straps......but like Wyobullshooter...I always go back to my 3000 cu. in. backpack and carry everything I might need. The Alps Big bear is interesting...a nice comfortable fanny pack with shoulder straps and side zip pockets about 700 cu. in....but with a pull-out big pocket that clips to the top of the padded shoulder straps and PRESTO...You have 2900 cu. in. !! Check it out on the Alps website.... Joe

22-Mar-19
2.5 year old thread. I wonder what people are entering into Google when they turn these up.

From: DanaC
22-Mar-19
I hate fanny packs, they don;t work well if your waist is bigger than your umm, hip measurement ;-)

I use a couple different daypacks but am looking for a good one-strap 'sling' pack for still hunting. The trouble is most makers can't help add little pockets to the front of the strap, which would catch on a bowstring. Any suggestions? (Not hung up on color either so long as it's not bright.)

22-Mar-19
I bought a sling pack when they first came out, not a fan. My strap was pocket free. But at the end of the day I felt lop sided. Was harder to put on/ take off since it had to go over your head messing up face net and glasses. So for me it's either a fanny pack or small back pack for turkey hunting, a deke sure uses up space.

From: cnelk
22-Mar-19
Is the 'Search' function available again?

From: LINK
22-Mar-19
“How far are you hunting from the road”

I agree with others that use a backpack. I’m carrying everything I need to kill, butcher and pack an elk. Then you add water, first aid stuff, snacks and other miscellaneous stuff and no way am I taking a fannypack. Many of my hunts that are 1/2 mile from the trucks turn into 2.5 miles from the truck. Many of my hunts close to roads also begin or end with a 800’ in elevation steep climb. I’m not going back for stuff just so I can save a couple of pounds.

From: Ucsdryder
22-Mar-19
Fanny packs suck. Best gear upgrade I ever made was getting rid of that PoS blacks creek fanny pack with shoulder straps.

From: Jaquomo
22-Mar-19
I also grew up elk hunting with fanny packs. But anymore since I now hunt solo I have more confidence with a daypack that fits me well and can carry a kill kit, overnight survival kit, first aid kit, a decent water bladder, rain gear and maybe one light Primaloft layer, some day hunting food. And one load can come out on the first trip.

I hike, scout, fish all summer with a daypack on so it's part of me. Sort of feel naked without it. Current favorites are Alps Traverse X and Badlands Diablo.

From: 12yards
22-Mar-19
You can get by with a fanny pack.............if you have good buddies willing to carry part of your load.

From: Mule Power
22-Mar-19
Fanny pack... the Mini Cooper of backpacks. He’ll have it bursting at the seams after deciding what items he has to live without.

From: elkmtngear
22-Mar-19
I carry 25 pounds of stuff in my daypack...so, if I want to walk around feeling like I have a diaper full of bricks...

From: Dyjack
23-Mar-19
I carry a heavy day pack. But even if I went light I'd like to have the pack for first load of meat so I'm not wasting a trip back to get the frame.

From: DanaC
23-Mar-19
Hawkeye, I'n not planning to put a *lot* in a sling pack, water, knife, rope, tp, matches etc. Minimum essentials. Well under ten pounds. It's little enough that even in my smaller daypack it feels 'sloppy. I hate fanny packs, and I hate 'cargo' pockets.

Late season I'll have enough spare clothes, snacks, thermos etc. to justify the large day pack, but I'll be carrying a long gun and sitting more.

From: BTM
23-Mar-19
What wyobullshooter, TD, Ron N., etc. said. Too much can go wrong to have only a fanny pack at your disposal. Maybe, perhaps, possibly for a SHORT morning hunt when you're sure the weather will be OK for a few hours, but never, never, never for an afternoon hunt. Murphy is out there!

From: wild1
23-Mar-19
Fanny packs never worked for me - I hate the feeling of the pack sagging over my rear end. I've tried the Badlands Monster fanny pack, with the shoulder straps, but with shoulder straps you might as well wear a day pack - and the ability to carry a bit more.

From: Jaquomo
23-Mar-19
I don't like the shoulder straps either, and don't like that feel of carrying a big dirty diaper sagging over my butt, so I made a plastic internal "frame" for my bigger fanny pack. Really helps. But I mostly only use it for short trips to check trail cams, fish, etc.

From: c3
24-Mar-19

c3's embedded Photo
c3's embedded Photo
I carry my 3.5 lbs Kuiu 3000 ultra with every thing to pack out an animal at all times for this very reason as wybullshooter said above. I either have my camera gear or I plan to put an animal down.

I've probably had a pack on my back like this for 2000 days in my life specifically for hauling camera gear most of the year and worth every calorie extra all those days so I don't have to do trips like this twice for one load.

Cheers, Pete

From: BrownMan
26-Mar-19

BrownMan's embedded Photo
BrownMan's embedded Photo

BrownMan's Link
I prefer to choose fanny pack instead of daypack.

From: LINK
26-Mar-19
That looks like a backpack with very limited possibilities to me. ;)

From: Jaquomo
26-Mar-19
Brownman, this is your preferred pack for hunting in Alaska, where you "live"?

26-Mar-19
I like a daypack for elk hunting from my truck or a base camp for sure. I almost never even take mine off. In fact, I have a daypack with me pretty much 100% of the time though so I'm pretty used to it. I'm using a Mystery Ranch 3 day assault pack right now. I really like it. Works just as good on the mountain as it does for me at the airport or going into my office. Wore it skiing for a week as well....very useful item to have.

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