Vortex Broadheads
A new toy
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Michael 19-Dec-17
Michael 19-Dec-17
PECO 20-Dec-17
Michael 20-Dec-17
The last savage 20-Dec-17
keepemsharp 20-Dec-17
PECO 20-Dec-17
The last savage 20-Dec-17
wild1 20-Dec-17
Buffalo1 20-Dec-17
PECO 20-Dec-17
yooper89 20-Dec-17
APauls 20-Dec-17
Rayzor 20-Dec-17
Buffalo1 20-Dec-17
Michael 20-Dec-17
Michael 20-Dec-17
Michael 20-Dec-17
Buffalo1 20-Dec-17
PECO 21-Dec-17
PECO 21-Dec-17
PECO 21-Dec-17
APauls 21-Dec-17
Michael 21-Dec-17
Paul@thefort 21-Dec-17
bow_dude 21-Dec-17
Paul@thefort 21-Dec-17
pa bowhunter 22-Dec-17
PECO 22-Dec-17
From: Michael
19-Dec-17

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When I found Bowsite back in 2011 one of the first things I noticed was how much I liked BB’s pictures.

So I started taking pictures myself. Although it was just with my cell phone. I then started taking some pictures threw digiscoping.

One of the first things I learned was for every 50 pictures I would take. I might find 2 I would like. Or at least it seemed that way.

This fall has been a great one for not only tags in pocket but the amount of time I was able to hunt. Unfortunately the vast majority of the time a good picture wasn’t in the cards do to various equipment issues.

So I decided to buy a DSLR camera. I know I need to get a couple of lenses but here is the start with what the camera came up with.

Other then I know the quality of the lens issues I have. What are some other issues you guys see?

From: Michael
19-Dec-17

Michael's embedded Photo
Michael's embedded Photo
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From: PECO
20-Dec-17
What camera did you get? Did you shoot 35mm SLR back in the old days?

From: Michael
20-Dec-17
I got a Canon Rebel EOS T6. No actually this is the first camera I have ever bought and used.

20-Dec-17
Mike I agree man its very rewarding taking a Great picture,,,the biggest lession I've learned is when I finally could Afford a good camera ,,I thought that new,much better camera..I'd be taking a great pic every other pic,,,,haaaaa,,no....it still takes hundreds or thousands of pics before you get that has dropping pic..love taking pics..your pics look great!

From: keepemsharp
20-Dec-17
I have a bushel of Nikon, Pentax, and numerous other stuff for film that would be a great deal for someone.

From: PECO
20-Dec-17
Read the manual. Play with your camera in all the different modes and settings. Get a book on basic photography, I may even have one I can send you if you PM me. One basic wildlife tip, is set your camera up in the program mode to use only the center focusing point. With the multiple focus points of modern cameras, you can bet one of the points NOT on your subject will lock on and you'll get a nice clear shot of sagebrush and a blurry deer. Do some research when looking for a telephoto lens. Be very careful if you decide to order online. There are a few very dirty online camera superstores, you can get screwed real bad.

20-Dec-17
Good advice Peco..

From: wild1
20-Dec-17

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Adorama and B & H are good online sources for equipment. Enjoy your new toy and buy the best Canon lenses you can afford - fast lenses make a difference.

From: Buffalo1
20-Dec-17
KEH is also a good source for used lens and equipment at reduced cost.

From: PECO
20-Dec-17
What lenses did you get with the camera?

From: yooper89
20-Dec-17
Michael - I bought the same camera this spring. Convinced my girlfriend we *had* to have it when our son was born in April so we could take pictures as he grew. Pretty great little package. I am going to take it out with me next weekend when I wrap up my archery tag in Nebraska.

From: APauls
20-Dec-17

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Congrats on the purchase! A very rewarding endeavor! I'm no expert either but can tell you a few things that I have learned. As others mention - the faster the lens, the better your end result. By "fast" we mean the smaller of the small numbers when you buy a lens. These numbers are the F stop. They'll say for ex f4-5.6 or something like that. Anything below 2 is pretty fast, but will not usually be a zoom lens. A "fast" lens takes in more light and will allow you to have a quick shutter speed, which matters for moving wildlife and especially low light scenarios.

If you are wanting to blow up pictures, make sure you know at what ISO number your pics are getting blurry, and you can usually set up your camera to max out at a certain number. Do this. Because otherwise, you may take a great picture, but your camera may jack up your ISO in order to reach the shutter speed you've asked for, and in the end, your effort is all for naught. Thought you had a great pic, but you look at it and it is grainy. Big time bummer. You'll notice those kinds of things in 3 out of 4 of your mulie pics above. At the end of the day I always think everything revolves around light. If you can understand the relationship between aperture, shutter speed, and ISO as a basic function of photography you''ll get your way around and have a great time! If you don't understand the relationship between those things, I would suggest reading until you do. It's all about light. There's a limited amount of it, and you may need to "give" in one area in order to "get" in another. Ex) you can't have a long depth of field, AND quick shutter speed in low light. (unless you've got a wicked lens :) But even then, money can only get you so far.

Unless it's daytime and there is snow on the ground - then you can have everything :)

From: Rayzor
20-Dec-17
If you are after good low light or moving subject performance you really need a fast lense. Most of them will cost you far more than what you paid for the camera....especially the zooms. In good light on stationary targets you the speed is not as critical. You can crank up the ISO to offset a slower lense somwhat as the light fades. Most zooms will be much faster at the low end of the range. Many people also don't realize that in some lower light conditions, shooting in auto, you are better off taking taking pics at a lower magnification rather than zooming in as the lense is much faster. Pull the file into an editing program to lighten and crop it. A tripod will make all the difference too. Alot but many people don't want to carry one around. I would however highly recommend a monopod. They obviously arent as stable as a tripod but they will improve you performance greatly and can double as a walking stick if needed. People can benefit greatly from basic digital photography classes as most digital cameras a far more capable that the person using it. Also there are a pile of online tutorials on Youtube. Like anything else it takes knowledge and a lot of practice. Also, even top photographers with tens of thousands of dollars worth of equipment don't capture great images with every shot the good thing about digital is you can take lots of pics and just delete. I say better to take to many than to miss getting a good shot of something that is improtant to you.

From: Buffalo1
20-Dec-17
Michael,

A camera is nothing more that an instrument that produces an image based on light.

Think of a camera as an eye-

Speed is how long light is allowed to enter the eye. On the human body this is eyelids i.e. how fast do you blink. The faster you blink the lesser amount of time light enters the eye. The slower you blink the greater amount of light enters the eye. 1/60 allows more light than 1/400, etc.

Light amount is how much light is allowed to enter the eye. On the human body this is your eye pupil. The higher the f-stop (the smaller pupil size) the less light enters the eye. The lower the f-stop (the larger the pupil size) the more light enters the eye. f 2.8 allows more light to enter than say f 8.0.

In order to avoid grain (aka noise in photography) stay on lower ISO numbers ISO 100 would give you a sharper image than ISO 1600. This is very important when considering enlargements

I would recommend 3 lens to pretty much handle your photography needs-

50 mm lens @ 1.8 18 - 55 mm lens @ 3.5-5.6 55-200 mm lens @ 4.0- 5.6

Tripods can be beneficial when taking still photos

Chips are cheap- take lots of photos and delete nothing until you look at your work on a computer screen. What looks good on camera viewer may not be a good photo at all.

The best ways to learn how to use your camera: 1. Hang with somebody that is a good photographer 2. Take a basic/beginners photography class 3. Take photos to experiment and learn.

Best of luck- photography is like archery/bowhunting or golf- it is a challenging, fun & exhausting/agonizing activity. You will never perfect the skill.

From: Michael
20-Dec-17
Thank you guys for all the help. I am soaking it in for sure. All of the pics were taken with the lens in the link. It’s the lens the camera came with.

All the pictures were taken in an automatic setting. Since these were all taken in between coyote calling stands I thought I needed to take fast pics since all of the deer seen me. After reading your comments I did go back and review what the shutter speeds and ISO was at for the various pictures. The camera did kick the ISO up to 3200 on the buck pics.

I do believe I was using the wrong Auto setting like Peco talked about and the camera didn’t always focus on the deer.

Honestly I don’t think much of the quality but a friend had told me to just get out there and shoot some pics to see where your starting point is. Lol

I plan on being in central SD over the New Years weekend so hopefully I can get some more pics that trip.

From: Michael
20-Dec-17

Michael's Link
Forgot the link.

From: Michael
20-Dec-17

Michael's embedded Photo
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This is the photo that got me really to think hard on wanting to take high quality pictures.

I was sitting there calling coyotes not enjoying the fog because it made it hard to see any coyotes coming in. This buck walks right by me at 35 yards. I reached into my coat and grabbed my cell phone and took some pics.

From: Buffalo1
20-Dec-17
Michael I can understand your feeling and desire to take better photos. I made my first western bowhunting trip to Western Colorado in 1979. I had a very cheap camera at the time. What my eyes saw and the poor quality of my photos were totally disheartening . Before my next trip to the West, I had a Canon AE-1. One of my all time favorite camera bodies. I began to get better quality photos and have always continued to improve.

Stick with it, learn your camera and lens, get some training if possible and you will see your quality improve, your satisfaction improve and your personal acceptable benchmarks improve. BB is one of my photography inspirations on Bowsite. Study his works and it will help you improve.

From: PECO
21-Dec-17
Ahhh the Canon AE-1, that was my first real camera also! Got it in 1980 when I went to Germany for my first duty station.

From: PECO
21-Dec-17
Michael, that is not a bad lens. You can get some great pictures with it. It is all about getting out of the auto mode and understanding the ISO/shutter speed/aperture relationship. It is give and take, kinda like tuning your bow and arrow setup. You will have an amazing fast learning curve with a DSLR. Unlike those of us who learned on 35mm and had to take notes and wait a week to get our film back.

From: PECO
21-Dec-17
APauls, love that fox picture.

From: APauls
21-Dec-17
Thx PECO!

I 2nd PECO's comments about the learning curve. I started with a film SLR and man that is a major pain trying to remember what you did. I would also say your buddy is right about just playing with the camera for starters. But I would start playing with it in "S" and "A" mode as those will be what you use most. That's shutter and aperture. Pay attention to what happens as you spin the dial. Notice as you crank the shutter speed up, the camera will be forced to move the aperture number to get smaller at a certain point. Understanding that relationship is key and finding the limitations. You will enjoy that lens. 300mm gets you out there. It is very enjoyable to have a good camera with. I just wish I could edit pics. I don't really know how so I just don't.

From: Michael
21-Dec-17
Thanks again guys. I really appreciate all of your help. I will be experimenting with your tips come New Years weekend.

APauls I will second that your fox pic is a great one. I don’t see many fox in the Midwest these days like we did when I was a kid. I might see one a year if I am lucky. Have never called one in either.

From: Paul@thefort
21-Dec-17
Adam, I edit all of my photos with the Picasa 3 system. There are other systems to download. Paul

From: bow_dude
21-Dec-17
My wife is quite the camera nut and takes great photo's. She has several camera's and lenses. She carries a small backpack with her favorite camera and lens, etc. with her when we go out to take pictures or just take a ride. She is constantly taking some sort of on line class and learning new techniques. Best advise she got and has put it to use is to throw away the "auto" mode and learn to take "manual" pictures. She has over 20 thousand pictures she has taken and saved. Not sure she will ever be able to view them all, but she has taken the time to categorize and file them. Learning how to "frame" the subject is a book in itself. Blurring the background and focusing on the subject was another class she took recently and the effects are magnificent. All of the class's she takes will have an instructor that will critique your pictures and help you learn. Very beneficial.

From: Paul@thefort
21-Dec-17

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I would expect your choice of camera and lens depends on what you want as the end results and purpose for the photos. Do you want the highest quality of photo you can achieve for publishing purposes, or will just normal/average photo results be ok for personal use. And then what can one afford to purchase a high end camera?

Personally as a hunter, on the move, I use my Panasonic Single Lens Digital camera, 60 X optical zoom lens, for ease of operation as I do not have time to change lens and the two setting I use are SCN (scenery for the depth of field) and then the Auto setting. Also, I do not want to carry the additional lens equipment as added weight. I down load all of my photos to my computer, ie, Picasa photo system for storage and adjustments.

I know BB started out this way and dazzled us with some great photos but then he decided to upgrade all of his equipment and to really get serious about his wildlife photography. More equipment, time and effort for sure but his final results are excellent, if not stunning.

I do acknowledge what others have stated above, you will take many photo to get one excellent one that meets all of the criteria. Framing the picture, using the correct lighting, and then understanding what the camera is capable of, will be important.

I take my camera on all of my hunts, well almost, and the two times I did not, I had a great opportunity to take a few wonderful shot of scenery and animals. Learned the hard way so now the camera is "attached to my hip". Now, if I wanted to produce "professional quality" photos, I would surely update my camera and most likely, extra lens and not worry about the weight or the ease of operation.

Good luck with your new toy. my best, Paul

From: pa bowhunter
22-Dec-17
Most of the advise here is solid, but, to get a jumpstart, go check out creativelive.com, they have some great instructors , and they are running some great specials right now, John Gringo has some of the best classes out there, plus once you buy the class its yours to keep and you can go back an reference the material anytime you want, just some food for thought, enjoy your new Camera.

Mike

From: PECO
22-Dec-17
Oh yeah, do not go cheap when you purchase a tripod.

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