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Let’s talk seed coating
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
RIT 08-Mar-18
Michael Schwister 08-Mar-18
drycreek 08-Mar-18
RIT 08-Mar-18
RIT 08-Mar-18
sdbowhunter 08-Mar-18
RIT 09-Mar-18
BullBuster 09-Mar-18
XMan 09-Mar-18
Mad Trapper 09-Mar-18
sdbowhunter 09-Mar-18
Montgomery 09-Mar-18
Buck-man 10-Mar-18
gobbler 10-Mar-18
sagittarius 10-Mar-18
Bowman 15-Mar-18
From: RIT
08-Mar-18
Just curious what the thoughts and science is behind seed coating. I did a google search and can’t seem to find a legitimate answer.

Long story short I ordered some seed from a reputable dealer. This particular seed was Chicory, Frosty Berseem, and Fixation Balansa clover. I was kinda stumped when I looked at the seed tag and found the seed coating was 50% of the contents.

08-Mar-18
ANything with a deers head on the bag is a ripoff IMHO. You can buy straight single seed types and make your own blend at much lower cost/much quality seed. Grandpa Rays outdoors, and Hancock seed are two reputable online sources. Commercial ag uses seed coatings such as innoculants and other biologicals, insecticides etc, but it amounts to a minute % of the bag.

From: drycreek
08-Mar-18
I think you're gonna find that to be true in any coated seed from any company. Coatings are as heavy as seed and that's hard to get around. About the only coated seed that I've used is Imperial clover and I've been very satisfied with it. I don't have a clue whether the coating is necesary or just window dressing, but I know I get good germination and the deer love it ! Yeah, I know it's the dreaded buck-on-bag brand, but the quantities that I plant along with the longevity of clover makes it a winner in my book.

From: RIT
08-Mar-18

RIT's embedded Photo
RIT's embedded Photo
Yikes! All 3 seed bags state about the same info.

From: RIT
08-Mar-18
I have to say I feel a little slighted here. Maybe I am just not understanding this but if I have a 6 lb bag and 50% of the weight is seed coating do I really only have 3 lbs of seed and only 80% of that will germinate?

From: sdbowhunter
08-Mar-18

sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo

From: RIT
09-Mar-18
Thanks guys that sums things up.

From: BullBuster
09-Mar-18
Ouch

From: XMan
09-Mar-18
oh, that was good reading sd, thanks for posting the details.

From: Mad Trapper
09-Mar-18
Outstanding. Thanks for posting.

From: sdbowhunter
09-Mar-18
I saved that magazine when I got it with that article in on how to figure out how many pounds of seed per acre you need and what I have went by to calculate out how many pounds I need. You don't actually get as much coverage as bags advertise they will cover. I'm glad I kept it. Usually look back at it each year when buying seed. If any one wants the whole article to read and can't see quiet all of it I can scan it in on my computer and post it or send it to you. Was just doing it on my phone last night so I can see some of the whole article was hard to read and just took pictures of the main stuff with the formulas.

From: Montgomery
09-Mar-18
Some soils like the bacteria or soil organisms that promote plant growth or germination. It's expected for any legume like alfalfa or clover to help the plant become established. Soybeans are also a legume that benefits from inoculated seed treatments. Especially after years of corn on corn and the bacteria essentially die off. Most of these treatments have a shelf life after which the inoculate will begin to "die off" after expiration date. Which will then in turn cause possible germination rate. All legumes also require different inoculates

From: Buck-man
10-Mar-18
complete rip off.

From: gobbler
10-Mar-18
Personallly, I would rather buy preinnoculated seed. The Clay helps hold moisture to help germination. I’ve done the inoculation myself and between getting it wet and drying it out prior to planting it took a day. Innoculant is a bacteria and can’t be dried in full sun because it will kill the bacteria

From: sagittarius
10-Mar-18
Montgomery, "Some soils like the bacteria or soil organisms that promote plant growth or germination. It's expected for any legume like alfalfa or clover to help the plant become established."

The specific inoculate bacteria for a specific legume only help grow the atmospheric nitrogen storing nodules on the legumes root system. Legumes germinate and use nitrogen and nutrients in the soil just like every other green plant. The nodules need energy from the plant to grow before absorbing Nitrogen from the air. If the legume cannot get enough Nitrogen from the soil then in times of stress the legume can tap into the Nitrogen in the root nodules. The bacteria in the nodules have a symbiotic relationship with the legume to benefit each other. But, on good soil with adequate rainfall, clover can be lush, healthy, and attractive without any innoculant.

From: Bowman
15-Mar-18
Could not pm sdbowhunter.

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