Black Gold Sights
Firebiner - Fire Starter
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
cnelk 08-Mar-18
Scar Finga 08-Mar-18
huntr4477 08-Mar-18
midwest 08-Mar-18
Sixby 08-Mar-18
DanaC 08-Mar-18
Jaquomo 08-Mar-18
cnelk 08-Mar-18
White Falcon 08-Mar-18
White Falcon 08-Mar-18
Ucsdryder 08-Mar-18
Grubby 08-Mar-18
Jaquomo 08-Mar-18
Jaquomo 08-Mar-18
Jaquomo 08-Mar-18
Matt 09-Mar-18
Jaquomo 09-Mar-18
midwest 09-Mar-18
GotBowAz 09-Mar-18
Scar Finga 09-Mar-18
APauls 09-Mar-18
Scar Finga 09-Mar-18
Jaquomo 09-Mar-18
Scar Finga 09-Mar-18
grubby 09-Mar-18
Jaquomo 09-Mar-18
Treeline 09-Mar-18
Jaquomo 09-Mar-18
Treeline 09-Mar-18
Treeline 09-Mar-18
nvgoat 09-Mar-18
GotBowAz 09-Mar-18
cnelk 09-Mar-18
Jaquomo 09-Mar-18
Jaquomo 09-Mar-18
Treeline 09-Mar-18
Ben 09-Mar-18
TD 09-Mar-18
APauls 09-Mar-18
Jaquomo 09-Mar-18
nvgoat 09-Mar-18
Grubby 09-Mar-18
Ambush 09-Mar-18
DanaC 10-Mar-18
Jaquomo 10-Mar-18
From: cnelk
08-Mar-18

cnelk's Link
Anyone use this yet? Looks pretty slick

From: Scar Finga
08-Mar-18
You can do the same thin with cotton balls and Vaseline. I have been doing that for 15 years. try it if you haven't, it burns very hot! I don't even have the fire biner!

From: huntr4477
08-Mar-18
Wouldn't it be easier to just carry a Bic lighter in your pack,rather than all those different components??!!

From: midwest
08-Mar-18
I always carry a Bic but don't trust it near as much as other forms of fire starter. A Bic is worthless when you get it wet. I want something with a HOT spark and storm proof matches. Always have cotton balls with vaseline and trioxine.

From: Sixby
08-Mar-18
I carry a ziplock with firestarter, waterproof matches, a magnesium bar and striker , cotton balls and two zippo lighters, Probably overkill but never in a situation where I could not start a fire. God bless, Steve

From: DanaC
08-Mar-18
lifeboat matches

From: Jaquomo
08-Mar-18
I have a little kit with me all the time, even scouting and fishing. It has a carabiner-style Klipp windproof butane "super lighter", a magnesium push striker, some windproof matches, extra fine steel wool, vaseline-soaked cotton balls, dryer lint, and a chunk of long burning fire starter. Very compact, always in my little survival kit with First Aid and a space blanket, signal whistle, mini flashlight with extra AAA battery, little signal mirror.

Like Sixby, I'm going to be the guy the news reports as "Injured hunter found safe, in good condition".

From: cnelk
08-Mar-18
I dunno - I thought it was neat - fire starter, utility blade, screwdriver, caribeaner and bottle opener all in one multi-tool for $10

From: White Falcon
08-Mar-18

White Falcon's embedded Photo
White Falcon's embedded Photo
I use Ferro rods.

From: White Falcon
08-Mar-18

White Falcon's embedded Photo
White Falcon's embedded Photo
Or my F/S kit

From: Ucsdryder
08-Mar-18
Scar finger, instead of cotton balls, try lint from your dryer screen. Rub it with Vaseline. You can barely put the fire out! Weightless. I put it in small zip lock baggies. I also use a rod. The vaseline catches fire easily.

From: Grubby
08-Mar-18
I have one, haven’t used it yet

From: Jaquomo
08-Mar-18
It does look like an interesting little tool for someone who otherwise wouldn't have fire starting stuff. Wonder if that striker wheel will work with wet hands or if the whole thing gets wet? I'll show you my "fire- biner" on Saturday. You could weld with this thing and it lights no matter what. Clips on a zipper pull or pack loop like a carabiner.

From: Jaquomo
08-Mar-18

From: Jaquomo
08-Mar-18

Jaquomo's embedded Photo
Jaquomo's embedded Photo

From: Matt
09-Mar-18
Cheater ;-)

From: Jaquomo
09-Mar-18
I don't believe in bringing a dull knife to a gunfight...

;-)

From: midwest
09-Mar-18

midwest's embedded Photo
midwest's embedded Photo
Brad, I hope you haven't been misusing the fire starter I brought you!

From: GotBowAz
09-Mar-18
Lou, I like that. Like you mentioned it would be a real concern if the striker wheel got wet. I smoked for many years so I always had a lighter and a back up lighter, cuz you know, that little nicotine demon demanded it. I now carry a bic in my pack along with Vaseline cotton balls but I sure like your fire biner much better.

From: Scar Finga
09-Mar-18
UCSDRyder, I give that a try, Thanks!

From: APauls
09-Mar-18
I always make sure I have footwear with laces so that if need be I can make a fire-bow ;)

Actually if you've never done it I would encourage everyone to at least once in their lives try making a fire without fire starter materials. I always knew the process and thought I could do it at any time. Tried and failed. Looked into it a little more, and wood selection is prob the #1 thing that would screw most guys. So many woods are horrible for this. Anyways, adjusted a little and was able to make it work. Very satisfying. I used it as a lesson to teach a young mens group and then we made chicken on the fire. Kids loved it.

From: Scar Finga
09-Mar-18
APauls,

I tried to do it with only what I had in my pack on a challenge from a buddy of mine. I tried it in 15 degree weather after a slushy rain. It took me over two hours to build a small fire. It was very frustrating and brought a lot of perspective to what we need to carry and be able to do. On this particular hunt, we had broke down about 12 miles from the nearest road that anyone would drive on, no cell service... it was a LOOONG walk out that day after already hiking 6 miles from the vehicle hunting in the morning. The challenge came after we made it back to camp that evening and we started talking about what could really happen especially if you got hurt. On this hunt and in this area, I never used to carry stuff for starting a fire. I always thought about stuff like that as a "Backwoods" kinda thing. I now carry more than enough stuff to get a fire going no matter how wet it is. I also carry a couple of small fire starter cubes. they are very lite and pretty small. Space blanket, whistle, duct tape and super glue are also very important items to carry.

Gents, if you have never done this, try it!

From: Jaquomo
09-Mar-18
Like Scar Finga describes, all that nostalgic flint-steel-firebow stuff is fine for Boy Scout camp on a sunny afternoon. Its cool and makes you feel like a real mountain man when a wisp of smoke comes out of that little "birds nest". The scouts are impressed!

But when Big League Real Life hits and the temperature drops 40 degrees in 30 minutes and everything is saturated with hail and the wind is blowing sideways and your fingers are numb and your ankle is bent sideways and it's getting dark, it's not scout camp anymore.

Every outdoorsman should read Jack London's classic short story, "To Build a Fire".

From: Scar Finga
09-Mar-18
Jaq,

I was having a conversation about this event with another really good friend of mine not long after this and he told me this "If you can't spend a night or two out in woods, completely alone, with no real shelter, and be prepared for whatever may be thrown at you, you should go find a new hobby" He said this in jest, but it actually struck a chord with me. Since then, I am always prepared as I can be when I am out in the woods. I also carry extra water, food, a few select items of clothing and a really good first aid kit in my hunting vehicle.

From: grubby
09-Mar-18
The fire biner will be clipped to my life jacket when canoeing, I always have a lighter in there but it doesn't hurt to be redundant. I have fire starting supplies in my pack and in my pocket just about all the time.

From: Jaquomo
09-Mar-18
Grubby, let us know if it works when it's saturated and your fingers are too. If so, that's impressive.

From: Treeline
09-Mar-18
I like that lighter, Lou. Where did you get it?

Will see what I can find in some of the backpacking stores up here or on-line might be cheaper.

I used to play with different old school methods of making fire - flint and steel, magnifying glass, bow, bird nest etc. Came to the conclusion that those methods can work but could be a real pain if you are hurt in any way or if everything is soaked.

I would have to say that I fall into the "lucky" category. Have been tromping the mountains, deserts, prairies and woods alone my whole life without anything to get me through a bad situation except maybe a bandaid. Most of the time no one even knew where I was. Have had some very close calls over the years.

I actually put a sticky on my calendar to make up some fire kits and put them down in my packs this weekend.

From: Jaquomo
09-Mar-18
Tavis, it's called a Klipp and I got it at REI before I started boycotting them for boycotting and discontinuing Camelback and Bell because their parent company also owns Savage Arms. I think it was about $17 there.

The heat from the blue flame extends up about 4", and because it's push-button, it works even with wet and cold hands. I's like a little jet engine. I just dropped it in a bucket of water and it fired right up on the third push. Try that with a Bic.

From: Treeline
09-Mar-18
Looking now, Lou.

Figure I need at least one for my fishing gear, one for my day pack and one for my big pack. Maybe a couple more for backup. Saved the lint from the dryer this morning and will start making some firestarter material and kits for each pack.

I have had some very close calls with no ability to make a fire. Midnight in a November snowstorm on my last elk hunt in Wyoming comes to mind... Damn glad Ron Niziolek was around and I was able to get one bar on my dying cell phone or I might not be here today...

Thanks!

From: Treeline
09-Mar-18
Any issues with that one at altitude - say over 12K?

From: nvgoat
09-Mar-18
I second Jack London's story "To Build A Fire". One of my all time favorites.

Years ago was deer hunting in Nevada and midday after a brief rain storm decided to try to start a fire. Was humbled when I couldn't get it done. Decided to get my act together and learn how. Read a great survival book "98.6, the Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive". Strongly recommended reading. I now always carry vaseline, cotton balls, windproof and waterproof matches, two lighters, and a sparker.

I like the look of that Klipp lighter. Question- do you have to refill it and if so how often?

From: GotBowAz
09-Mar-18
Treeline, i just order one for $14.00 dollars on Amazon. they have orange and black.

From: cnelk
09-Mar-18

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
I did some rummaging around my shop this morning.

Made my own :)

From: Jaquomo
09-Mar-18
What, no duct tape or baling twine involved? ;-P

Tavis, I've never used it that high. Only reason I need to get to that altitude anymore is on an airplane and they won't let me use it there.. You do have to refill it with a butane filler. Stick the little nozzle in the port on the end and press down. You can adjust the flame height with a fingernail. It's HOT! I don't know how often it needs to be refilled because I just got it this past fall.

Another great book on survival is Laurence Gonzales's excellent work, "Deep Survival - Who lives, who dies, and why". Not only is it an analysis of a bunch of good and bad real-life situations, but it also breaks down the mental and emotional aspects of surviving. Plane crashes in the jungle, stranded in a snowdrift when nobody knows where you are, lost in the wilderness, etc.. It's a LOT more involved than simply building a fire.

From: Jaquomo
09-Mar-18
One thing - if you get one of these little "jet engine" lighters, read the instructions. You have to hold the button down halfway to get the fuel flowing before you ignite it. You don't "flick" it like a Bic.

Also, note that the flame is almost invisible in daylight and you can burn your hand or something else a ways away from where you think the flame ends. I learned this the hard way....

From: Treeline
09-Mar-18
Thanks! Ordered 4 off Amazon and also 4 sets of waterproof matches and containers. Don't need to freeze to death out there.

From: Ben
09-Mar-18
Jaq, I don't even want to know why you had the lighter pointed there! LOL

From: TD
09-Mar-18
Torch lighters are great for that victory cigar as well...... =D

I have em all over the place, hanging on the dash on my truck, in my pack, archery bench for burning tag ends (careful around the bowstring and cables...) workbench(s) I have a couple that you can solder with in a pinch. Check them from time to time and make sure they are topped off, having mechanical valves and such they can and do leak. I have waterproof matches, ferro stick, 000 steel wool, cotton balls, etc. Instead of Vaseline I carry packs of neosporine. Pretty much the same thing as Vaseline with a couple other uses too. All in my first aid kit anyway.

I've lost a couple torch lighters over the years flying with them, I use my pack as a carryon, they are actually pretty good here at finding them. For some reason bics are fine, but not the torches. TSA stands for "Takes Sh!# Away".

From: APauls
09-Mar-18
Definitely be prepared for when $hit goes sideways. I was simply saying every guy should try starting a fire that way once. If you try it randomly your very first time and have a flame going in 5 minutes you're prob a special dude. I just found it an interesting process. Torch lighters, zippos, matches in waterproof bags...

From: Jaquomo
09-Mar-18
APauls, I totally agree with you. It can be a startling experience to try to start a fire with semi-primitive methods even under ideal conditions. Some great examples of that on "Naked and Afraid"..

From: nvgoat
09-Mar-18
Also agree with "Deep Survival - Who lives, who dies, and why". Amazing book that makes you think about situations and yourself. Everyone who ventures into the wild should read this book.

From: Grubby
09-Mar-18
I grabbed the firebiner this afternoon, through it in a glass of water for 5 minutes and started some dryer lint in short order with hands that were cold but still semi functional. It will start a fire but it doesn’t produce near the spark that most of my other devices do and the sparks don’t seem to stay alive like they do with the Ferro rod .

From: Ambush
09-Mar-18
I taught all my kids how to make wilderness emergency fires when they were early teens. We'd pick a wet, late fall day or early spring and hike around the bush awhile, then pretend we were lost. Sometimes birch bark was available, but always spruce pitch and lots of tiny dead twigs. They were always pretty proud when we had a fire strong enough to cook some sausage bits and snacks. They were allowed five homemade, wax dipped, strike anywhere matches. The rest had to be gathered nearby.

From: DanaC
10-Mar-18
https://www.amazon.com/UCO-Stormproof-Waterproof-Matches-Strikers/dp/B008CL24SA

From: Jaquomo
10-Mar-18
Thanks, Grubby. Good to know it's not a gimmick!

  • Sitka Gear