Carbon Express Arrows
What if?
Wild Sheep
Contributors to this thread:
BowmanMD 18-Apr-18
Bill Obeid 18-Apr-18
nvgoat 18-Apr-18
nvgoat 18-Apr-18
sticksender 18-Apr-18
Charlie Rehor 18-Apr-18
Jim in PA 18-Apr-18
LINK 18-Apr-18
TXHunter 18-Apr-18
loesshillsarcher 18-Apr-18
IdyllwildArcher 18-Apr-18
Bou'bound 18-Apr-18
Quinn @work 18-Apr-18
g5smoke21 18-Apr-18
TXHunter 18-Apr-18
Mark Watkins 18-Apr-18
Kurt 18-Apr-18
Sandbrew 18-Apr-18
Mossyhorn 19-Apr-18
TEmbry 19-Apr-18
TXHunter 19-Apr-18
JBarch 19-Apr-18
JDM 19-Apr-18
tkjwonta 19-Apr-18
StickFlicker 19-Apr-18
ELKMAN 19-Apr-18
TEmbry 19-Apr-18
BowmanMD 19-Apr-18
Mossyhorn 19-Apr-18
Sandbrew 19-Apr-18
tkjwonta 19-Apr-18
TXHunter 19-Apr-18
caribou77 19-Apr-18
Shrewski 19-Apr-18
SBH 20-Apr-18
LINK 20-Apr-18
kota-man 20-Apr-18
Halibutman 21-Apr-18
TXHunter 21-Apr-18
BowmanMD 30-Apr-18
Southern draw 30-Apr-18
kscowboy 30-Apr-18
BigOzzie 30-Apr-18
APauls 30-Apr-18
caribou77 30-Apr-18
DL 30-Apr-18
APauls 30-Apr-18
TXHunter 30-Apr-18
APauls 30-Apr-18
caribou77 30-Apr-18
Blacktail Bob 30-Apr-18
llamapacker 30-Apr-18
Ambush 30-Apr-18
From: BowmanMD
18-Apr-18
So I think I've been bit by the sheep bug. I shot my first sheep two years ago, a beautiful dall sheep in Alaska, and now I'm seriously considering a stone sheep hunt. I'm just having a hard time justifying the cost. With a stone hunt approaching $50k, it's tough to rationalize for one person. To put it in perspective, what if your wife told you she wanted to take 3 weeks off of work and go on a $50k vacation? It would make for an interesting marital discussion, even if you are in a financial position to manage it. And undoubtedly, there are some pretty pricey, high-end vacations out there but I think you would be hard-pressed to find a three week vacation that would cost $50k for ONE person. I get it, everything has a price and it's only worth what someone is willing to pay for it and some people are willing to pay more for some things than other people are. I also look at it as paying for an adventure, memories that will last forever, a once-in-a-lifetime experience, etc, but ultimately, is it worth it? Obviously, it's a question that each of us can only answer for ourselves given our individual background, values, family/financial situation, etc, but I'm curious, how would you guys respond to the "what if"? And for the guys who have gone on a high-priced sheep hunt, was it worth it? Any regrets? Would you do it again?

Sean

From: Bill Obeid
18-Apr-18
Pretty soon it’ll be cheaper to move to B.C. and live than to hunt Stones.

From: nvgoat
18-Apr-18

From: nvgoat
18-Apr-18
Pm sent.

From: sticksender
18-Apr-18
The best quote I've ever read on this site: "Life is short, write the check".

There are plenty of ways to make more money, but there's no way to buy back the years you will have lost while procrastinating. If you can't afford it, you might not want it bad enough. Be clever and industrious and continue to hunt sheep.

A few well-placed diamonds can take care of the things you're worried about on the domestic front ;-)

18-Apr-18
Let your conscience be your guide! You put it a neat way by revearsing roles with your spouse.

From: Jim in PA
18-Apr-18
Is it worth it? Only you can answer that. Saying that I will tell you how I looked at it. I had three, Stone Dall and Bighorn. This was 2006 so the prices were significantly less. I really wanted to hunt a Desert but the price was about what you are looking at and as hard as i tried I couldn't justify it.

My wife and I were at a convention and they gave a Grand Slam award posthumously to a guy that had passed away the previous October. I remember he was 53 years and had a heart attack. My wife leaned over to me and said go book your hunt. I kind of looked at her like she was nuts and she said do you want to do it while you can enjoy it or you want to wait till your to old to even think about climbing a mountain. Long story short I went, finished my FNAWS ( Grand Slam) and never once regretted it! Do it while you can.

From: LINK
18-Apr-18
If I could afford it, I could justify it at least once. If you like it and can afford it, do it. You can’t take it with you, so unless that 50k is going to make a noticeable difference in your kids life, go hunt.

From: TXHunter
18-Apr-18
A very personal decision.

I think the answer mostly depends on your financial situation.

If it won’t put you at financial risk and you want it badly enough - then do it.

If either side of that equation doesn’t work for you, you probably shouldn’t. Sounds like you probably have both sides of the equation covered to me.

Something to bear in mind is that Stone sheep hunts are not guaranteed affairs. There were several guys going for their 2nd and 3rd times who did not get their ram on previous hunts on the plane when I took mine back in 2006. Something to consider. Good luck with your decision.

18-Apr-18
You can do it! Research outfitters thoroughly prior to making a choice. With the cost of these hunts anymore, it is a punch to the gut if you are unsuccessful. Definition of success is different per individual but the common goal is harvesting a great ram. Personally, I went four times to get my ram and I do not wish that upon anyone(financially). Mark Watkins may be a gentleman to give advice about different outfitters in the mix currently. I am a bit out of the game when it comes to Stones now. Perhaps you already have an outfitter in mind but my advice is choose wisely especially at current prices. They are becoming mind boggling. Yikes Hope to see a pic with a ram in your hands. lol

18-Apr-18
Great question Sean and one we All ask ourselves. Having worked in the drilling rigs my whole life and having to pay for all my own hunts all over the world I asked this question many times. I’ve shot 24 rams and goats all over the world and spent my whole paychecks many of times on these hunts, Pakistan was 50000$ brown bear 20000$ on and on.

I don’t have fancy cars or anything but two weeks after I get home from these hunts it always hits me and that is I’m back to normal life and I relish in the memory I have just taken in, the different world the different flowers and animals and this is why I spend the money I do, life goes by so fast that if we don’t go on these adventures we never get to leave our normal lives.

And to top it off a year after my big dollar hunts I find myself looking for the next one as now a whole year has gone by and work is the same except in a year older, live it up my friend cause time waits for. No one. Have a great season and there’s no better feeling then knocking a ram down especially a stone ram.

I’ve got one hunt right now thay a guy had to move and it’s ina. Great area with a great outfitter for 36000$ it will be 39000$ all in with everything for the hunt.

18-Apr-18
Just plan on doing it for the next 3 years and have that time open. Then get on the cancellation list of a few outfitters and go last minute. It'll be way cheaper and you still get to go.

From: Bou'bound
18-Apr-18
Unless you have no other person counting on you in you your life $50,000 for a hunt is pretty selfish for most people

18-Apr-18
Well there ya go I guess.if you so say bou I wasn’t being selfish I feel I was living life to the fullest and taking advantage of every sheep hunting opportunity I was able to get, was a cancellation hunt for 2 rams that was a 70000$ hunt. And here I sit today I no different stature still working still breathing the same only now I have the experience of that hunt

From: Quinn @work
18-Apr-18
Nice Rolling Stone’s reference Pat. “Time waits for no one”

From: g5smoke21
18-Apr-18
I think it would vary from person to person greatly...personally i would not be able to justify it...i can afford it now and my wife and I are both still only in our 20s...i personally would rather do several other hunts at this time in my life and travel with her..she would have no ambition to go along on a hunt like that. However we are going to africa together next year for our first safari and to get her first animal so that could open a whole new door. Dont get me wrong i would love to kill a sheep, just not at this point for me. And she has pretty much given me a green light on any hunt i want. I typically try for one out of state / country hunt a year for me and 2 tropical vacations a year with her

From: TXHunter
18-Apr-18
Bou, $50K may be a lot/selfish for “most people”. But “most people” don’t have the will or desire to be sheep hunters. Heck, even “most hunters” don’t.

Most sheep hunters I have met are financially able to spend 50K with zero impact on their family or even lifestyle.

The ones for which 50K is indeed a sacrifice are willing to make the sacrifices needed to pursue their passion without negatively affecting their families. In other words, I have found those passionate enough to want to hunt sheep are also responsible enough to not risk their families’ future to do it. Because they are by and large great people.

Sorry if I come off as lecturing, but IMO that comment was flippant and unfair. Lots of guys driving $50K + pickups down the road and are in debt up to their eyeballs.

From: Mark Watkins
18-Apr-18
BowmanMD,

Like Nedly, I had the "opportunity" to do four archery Stone hunts between 2015-2017, Finally getting my one shot after 44 days.

I have always tied my sheep hunts to a net income goal for my company. If we reached it, I booked. If we didn't achieve, I didn't hunt sheep...that simple.

Let me know if I can help

Mark

From: Kurt
18-Apr-18
I went on eight backpack Stone hunts before I arrowed one...lucky I was a BC resident. But the catch was I then had 3 species and was a Dall short of an archery FNAWS/Grand Slam. I booked in the NWT last year and had a great hunt. Glad I went while I could still climb. Getting the Dall on day 7 was something I'll never forget...and way more valuable to me than the $$$ in the bank. But I'm sure glad the other 3 species were DIY or there is no way I'd ever have gotten a Grand Slam...too cheap to have gone on a pile of guided sheep hunts.

From: Sandbrew
18-Apr-18

Sandbrew's embedded Photo
Sandbrew's embedded Photo
Go while you're young. The mountains are not getting any less steep. Stone sheep hunts are not getting any cheaper. Just do it! Be prepared to not get one and enjoy the experience. The experience is something I will cherish forever!

I went on a short notice (just 6 days) Stone hunt in 2015 and hunted hard for 12 days. We saw several sheep but only 1 for sure legal ram on day 11 that I was given the green light on. It was a tough shot but I rushed it and missed. I was sure that was my 1 and only chance. On my last day, day 12, at literally the 11th hour, my guide and I made one last chance climb and stalk on a far away ram spotted from camp. Just at sunset the ram was standing at 58 yards away facing us on a ridge, but he was back-lit and we couldn't age him for sure, so we had to let him walk. It was a tough pill to swallow but the experience was awesome. I kept a good attitude and didn't complain about anything weather, lack of legal rams, none of which an outfitter can really control. My guide and I gave it 110% every minute of everyday we could and the outfitter saw that.

This summer I got a cal from the outfitter and he said "I have a late cancellation can you make it back up here?" I told him I needed to check with my wife since I needed to leave in less than 3 weeks and would miss our anniversary . Knowing how much it meant to me she said yes. I was back in a BC sheep camp before opening day. I filled my tag with my rifle, which was the plan all along on day 6 with a beautiful full curl ram. PM me if you want a recommendation on a great outfitter. GO! Sandbrew

From: Mossyhorn
19-Apr-18
Personally, I could afford it... but I'm not going to do it. I've killed a dall while living in Alaska and while I'd love to shoot a stone, I don't feel it's all that much different than a dall. Shoot! You could darn near go on three dall hunts for that price!!!

I cannot justify spending that kind of money when I could be using it to invest in my family's future or doing things with/for my family. While I could do it without impacting my family's well-being and everything else, it's the principle of it all. If my wife took off and spent 50k on a vacation for just herself, can't say I'd feel all warm and fuzzy about it.

From: TEmbry
19-Apr-18
My struggle with this concept is the concept of the "experience". Is the experience of a remote stones hunt any different than that of a remote Dall hunt for 1/3 the cost?

Is the trophy different or the experience, since we are doing a cost analysis.

I'm not one to put down anyone else for going on super expensive hunts, but sometimes it's spun in a way that leaves me scratching my head. Chasing after a different trophy isn't a bad thing to admit.

From: TXHunter
19-Apr-18
Sometimes you just want what you want. No man owes any other man an “explanation” of why he wants to do something. At the end of the day, it’s nobody else’s business.

My first sheep hunt was for a Fannin. Why? Because I wanted to see the north country and loved their coloring. I might go on a dark Stone hunt in the future for the same reasons.

From: JBarch
19-Apr-18
I still haven't seen anyone answer the original question of how you would respond if your significant other asked to go on a similar vacation. For my wife and her interests it wouldn't be all that hard to run up that kind of money on a single person trip that I wasn't invited on. I guess I never thought of it that way. Don't get me wrong as I'll always find a way to spend money on hunting trips and justify it, but would I be able to justify sending her on a trip of her own like that?

Without a doubt. We both work hard and when it all comes down to it we're a team just like everyone else on here. I'm reading a lot of guys write out how the wife is actually the intsigator of many of these types of hunts. If you know that it'll make him/her happy, why not? Many of the best marriages I've encountered have a foundation in working for the other person's happiness and I strive to make that my primary goal in life. Sometimes it gets in my way, but in the end I know that she's working just as hard for my happiness.

So yes, I would be more than happy to send her out into the world with $50k to blow if we could afford it.

From: JDM
19-Apr-18
I know what you mean. I went on a stone hunt last year. The way I "justified" it was that I'd be retiring soon, (last January), and this was something I'd really wanted to do and it could be a retirement gift to myself. I'd worked overtime for three years to save up for the hunt. On the way to put down the deposit, I had a lot of anxiety. It was a LOT of money; My wife wouldn't understand........ But while stopped at a stop light, I happened to look over and on the pole the light was on, there was a poster glued to it that simply said, "Everything will be alright". I took it as a sign and booked the hunt, but shaking so hard that I almost couldn't sign my name on the check. It was a fabulous experience - one I wouldn't trade; money well spent.

There was a commercial on TV a few years ago where a girl said, "Daddy always says, money don't spend itself". My favorite saying is, "it's only money, and there's more where it comes from". If you can afford it, no need to justify it. You won' be disappointed.

From: tkjwonta
19-Apr-18
For me, I think the, "can we afford it?" question is pretty difficult to answer. Personally, it's tough for me to justify spending it now even if it shouldn't negatively impact my family going forward. Even with that money gone, I should still be able to hit my retirement and kids' college savings goals, but I'd be much more comfortable doing it at 50 when those balances are already mostly achieved as opposed to at 30 when those savings should get achieved eventually.

From: StickFlicker
19-Apr-18
"A few well-placed diamonds can take care of the things you're worried about on the domestic front ;-)"

Many would have to add the costs of doing something similarly expensive for your spouse in addition to the actual costs of the hunt, possibly doubling the costs of an already expensive hunt.

From: ELKMAN
19-Apr-18
If I was a multi BILLIONAIRE I still wouldn't spend 50K of my family's future on an animal. (And don't say it's the experience because you can do that without the check book)

From: TEmbry
19-Apr-18
A multi billionaire saying he wouldn’t spend $50k on a hunt is mathematically equivalent to someone with $1 million in the bank saying they wouldn’t spend $25 on a hunt. I think someone is either fibbing or doesn’t understand math lol

The point of my post wasn’t to question guys going on these hunts, just why they spin it as an experience for the cost instead of admitting it’s because of the species. It’s okay to trophy hunt fellas!

From: BowmanMD
19-Apr-18
Great comments. I love hearing everyone's different opinions and insight. A couple of observations:

1. Not many people regret the decision to go once they've decided to bite the bullet and pull the trigger.

2. Like some guys voiced, it's family first, regardless of everything else. If my wife said no, then it'd be a no. But, nurturing a good relationship where the varied, and sometimes conflicting, interests of both partners are equally considered usually avoids the "no! absolutely not!" response and rather opens the opportunity for discussion and compromise.

3. Not many guys answered the original "what if" question. Even with the above comment about equal, respectful marriage relationships, it would still be tough for me to be "fair" if my wife wanted to go on a trip equal in value to match each of my hunting trips. I would definitely think twice before writing the checks for my hunts if I knew I'd be doubling it every time.

4. As for the comment about spending my "family's future", I think it would be foolish to compromise my family's financial stability now or in the future just to go on a hunt. Saving, budgeting and making it work--absolutely, but never if I'm going to have to stress about it putting us on the brink. BUT, that being said, I don't know about you guys, but I am NOT working so that my kids don't have to. Sure, I'll help with college, etc, but they can get their own jobs and support themselves without relying on me or any money they're thinking I'm going to be leaving them. Selfish? Not in my book--I'm raising my kids to take care of themselves. My wife is a different story, but that's what life insurance is for (in case I die on a sheep hunt! 8)

Ultimately, it's a personal decision that each person is going to have a different answer to, but I do enjoy hearing how different people approach the same decision!

From: Mossyhorn
19-Apr-18
I’ll answer the question... if my wife wanted to do this, we’d have a serious conversation about what’s really important at this point my in our lives. I’d say I think it’s a mis-use of our money.

We’d never be in this situation because my wife is frugal and never dream of spending that kind of money. Now, we’re setting ourselves up to be in a great spot in the future. Maybe at that time this conversation would be totally different.

I’d expect my wife to say the same thing to me if I wanted to do the same thing. She’d probably look at me like I was crazy and flat out say no! Ha ha ha!

From: Sandbrew
19-Apr-18
What if answered- Several years ago my wife wanted to go on a 16-18 day trip to China with her Post Grad class. At the time this was a serious stretch financially. Also I would be left home alone for the entire trip with 2 kids under 7 and would need to figure out childcare and still go to my 50+ hour a week job. Bottom line she wanted to go bad enough that we skimped and saved as much as we could since I wasn't about to say no. For her it was the experience of a life time and she was happy. The kids and survived and we had fun while we missed her. She has said many times, I'll be taking off our kids years 14-18 and I'll have to deal with them in exchange for all my hunting days away. In our world it's not a 1 for 1 swap on hunting days or dollars spent we simply take care of each other and when something planned changes the other will pickup the slack or make it all work out.

FYI - No diamonds other than the first one have ever been exchanged....

Things that really make a difference day to day aren't that hard to do - Put down the toilet seat. Do a load of laundry and fold it! Do the dishes, including emptying the dishwasher and putting everything away in its correct place....I still have trouble with this one. Make a nice dinner and clean it up.

Sandbrew

From: tkjwonta
19-Apr-18
"Women spell love T.I.M.E."

From: TXHunter
19-Apr-18
Lol again - personal.

My relationships with my wife and kids are the foundation of my happiness-in fact, our relationships with each other are the foundations of all our happiness. And we are very happy and have been for over 30 years now.

That means that, in all things, we make/teach responsible decisions coupled with support for one another. For us as a couple, that means that neither me nor my wife are going to make descisons that undermine our financial stability. That being a given, we support each other in each other’s things that make us happy.

Again, no one on here has any basis to advise others on what is right/works for them unless you walk in their shoes. And no one on here does.

Geez.

From: caribou77
19-Apr-18
To answer the original question, it wouldn't matter to me if she spent 50k on a vacation that SHE was paying for and always wanted to do and could afford. I'm not married but if I was I would make sure the family was first, but you're damn right I would go on a hunt I worked my ass off and saved for.

I'm not rich but I plan on hunting sheep in the next 3 years. I'm putting money in an account weekly to pay for my trip. It will be dalls as that is my dream. If it was stone... if I'd be saving longer... lol though honestly I look at the money I'm gonna spend and think of how many trips I could do for other things.

From: Shrewski
19-Apr-18
I went on a Stone sheep hunt in the Yukon in 2002. I saved for 20 years to do that hunt as a 34 year old married with 2 kids man and never used any “family” money to do it. Always side work or scrimping on things for myself and squirreling the money away.

I worked the first 12 years of my career at GM. I watched literally HUNDREDS of guys in that time who worked 30-40 years and finally retired and they were DEAD within a year. I vowed not to wait until I retired to do the hunts I want to go on. I doubt I will be able to retire ever but if I do have to work one more year to pay for the hunts I’ve taken, I am good with that! As a bonus I’ve had a beautiful 10 1/2 old Stone ram to look at every day for the past 16 years to remind me of the most incredible hunt and wilderness I will ever see.

I’ve hunted bighorns on a CO draw and will hunt them again in Wyoming soon. I’m never going to be able to hunt Deserts unless I draw. I am having trouble justifying a Dall hunt (or a brown bear hunt) so I get my fix deer hunting DIY on Kodiak; that I can justify.

Do the hunts you can do as soon as you can do them. Prices never go down and the longer you wait the less time you have to enjoy those memories.

From: SBH
20-Apr-18
To answer your question, if my wife wanted to go on a $50k three week vacation....she would never ask. In our situation, that would be totally insane for either of us. Just wouldn't happen.

Theres plenty of adventure to be had for a lot less. While my kids are at home, my money and priorities will be spent with them while I have their interest. Lots of that time/money will be spent hunting, camping and fishing with them. When they are out of the house, I am scheming some other hunts. I don't plan on retiring ever, just working less hopefully. I make a good living and am a saver but I'm self employed and you never know what each year will bring. Long story short, I don't think I'll ever go on a hunt like that but it's also not a huge priority for me I guess. Happy to do all the hunting I get to do in MT and starting to stretch into some other nearby states to extend my season right now.

From: LINK
20-Apr-18
My wife has posed this what if question to me. She supports my hunting efforts at the same time she doesn’t understand why I want to leave her and spend a grand or two to hunt elk when I can hunt whitetails all day from the house. Anytime she has stated this what if, I tell her to go and have fun, that some time away from the kids and me would do her some good. I also don’t gripe when she wants to spend money on herself. Spending money constantly on arrows, bows, clothes, stands, tags and nagging your wife when she spends money is a sure way to end up divorced or creating in her a hatred for your hobby. If I buy a high end pack I buy my wife something or give her some gift cards. I tell her if you don’t spend that on yourself you’re getting some more. I can get away with that though because my wife is very frugal.

From: kota-man
20-Apr-18
I take a similar outlook to Mark Watkins on this one. When my company is doing well, I reward myself. I'm doing my second Stone Hunt this August.

As far as my wife goes, she gets what she wants when she wants it and we go where she wants to go on Winter vacations. She is not a hunter, and doesn't even try to understand my passion, but has no problem with it. When she wants to put in new flooring for the third time in house that we built 15 years ago, I bite my tongue and say "yes dear, of course we need new flooring", or when we tear out all of the counter top in the kitchen after 5 years and replace it with granite I say "yes dear of course we need new counter tops"... :)

From: Halibutman
21-Apr-18

Halibutman's embedded Photo
Halibutman's embedded Photo
I'm on the plane headed home from a desert sheep hunt. My wife is pregnant with our first child, due in June. When the chance presented, Holly gave me her blessing. I shot this 172-2/8" ram making me a 3/4 slammer.

If you want it, you'll get it. If you don't really want it, you won't.

This hunt cost me over half a years take home pay. I will NEVER regret it.

You can use money many ways. You can start fires, wipe your ass, invest, spend, or bequeath it. I'm not afraid of what the future holds, nor do I aspire to achieve great wealth. I want to be happy, and hunting makes me happy. I plan to do it as often as possible for as long as possible. Hopefully, I'll get to take my as yet unborn son to visit my favorite places.

Do what you want. Beware of regret and endeavor to live your best life. After all, you only get one try!

From: TXHunter
21-Apr-18
“It’s been hard on your Ma, but damn foolishness to one man is breath of life to another.”

Elroy Jackson, Sr. in “The Last American Hero”

From: BowmanMD
30-Apr-18
Thanks for all of the replies. Great thoughts and discussion. Only bad part is that I think it is going to end up costing me a lot of money! Pretty sure that I'm going to bite the bullet, take the jump and go for it. Probably 2020. Any suggestions on outfitters would definitely be appreciated since I only want to do this once! (until I go, then I'll probably want to go back and do it again!$$$$$$)

30-Apr-18
I have been blessed to hunt and kill two stones in two different ( rifle ) hunts, these hunts were 20 plus years ago and costs were 12.000 and 15.500 but I had sheep fever then and still do . I have never looked back and had an once of regret for any of my sheep hunts. I wish you well on your hunt and as far as outfitters go I hunted with Ross Peck and Dale Drinkall both operations have changed hands but their replacements are doing well. pm anytime with questions.

From: kscowboy
30-Apr-18
I have some leads for you on the Stone Sheep. I went to Sheep Show this past year and that was my focus for conversations. My advice would be to attend next year and have a list of outfitters you want to meet. I have 2 down and 2 more to go and will try drawing Desert for the next 25-30 years before biting the bullet and going to Mexico. I have no choice but to pay the money and go to Canada for the Stone.

PM me and I am happy to visit with you over the phone.

From: BigOzzie
30-Apr-18
I cannot invision spending 50k on a hunt, I love to hunt, but 50k would almost pay off the house. 50k would cover both my kids weddings. 50k would build the shop I want to get my business rolling. 50k would drill the well and put the septic in at our family cabin. 50k would do many things in my mind. I would prioritize them all and look at what is left behind for my family.

My legacy that I leave to my kids is more the deer skulls on the wall that they shot with me than it is skulls I killed on extravagant hunts. When they take over my business or sell my business, I want the to walk into the shop and say "remember when we all got bucks at the cabin that on year? I think it is those three over there." I have no desire for them to say "remember when dad went on the 14 day 50k trip and shot the sheep, he was so happy, there it is over there"

If I could put out 200K and the kids and I could hunt sheep, and mamma could go spend her 50K, I would. But #$%^ will freeze over before I have 200k of discressional income to spend.

oz

From: APauls
30-Apr-18
Personally I disagree with the comments of: "If you want it bad enough you can do it." I can't count the number of times I hear complaining on this site about millenials and they're problem with instant gratification. I wonder where it comes from? Guess what? No matter how bad everyone wants it, not everyone is going to go sheep hunting. That's the real truth.

One can say "well if you really want it, you could divorce your family, work like an animal, and go into debt the rest of your life, so you can sheep hunt today." True, a person could maybe do that. But I'm not considering the average guy throwing his life away so that he can hunt sheep. We need to be rational about this. A $50,000 vacation is something very very few people can financially absorb. And that's OK. We don't get everything we want in life and that's OK. There's a ton of hunting a guy can do for $1,000 or less. I am very thankful for those opportunities. For most people, not being able to hunt sheep in a lifetime is OK. If you want the sheep type experience, there are other high elevation hunts that can be done for very little $. No I know, it isn't a sheep hunt experience, but it can be a lot of the same enjoyments.

I'm not trying or pretending to be the "dream-killer" guy, but the reality is you can't always be ANYTHING you want to be (tell that to a young man I recently hired who couldn't be a military jet pilot because his vision isn't nor would ever be good enough even with surgery) and you can't necessarily DO everything you want to DO. But if a person takes the right mental approach and the right attitude, EVERYONE can be content with the life they are living. Sometimes as a really driven person I struggle with that one. I WANT to have it all. We need to stop telling ourselves we can have it all, because very few can. Telling yourself you can have it all, and then not being able to sets yourself up for a long run of disappointment.

As for the OP, maybe you can, maybe you can't. No one knows but you and it's what you value in life. If you are balancing being able to do things in your retirement vs one sheep hunt today, it's always easy to take the today route. Being cash-strapped for all of retirement doesn't sound great either. Everyone here marvels at how Charlie gets to hunt whitetails across the midwest every year, and that he's put himself into that situation is great. Well $50,000 invested wisely and used could prob allow a guy to whitetails nearly unlimited every year for the rest of his life. There's a lot of options for $50,000.

From: caribou77
30-Apr-18
Personally I will now disagree on this with you APauls. Anyone that wants to afford a sheep hunt can. Will it take time, yes. Dreams don t happen over night. But IF you want to do it you can. Does it mean no Friday night out with the boys for beers every week? No gym membership? No internet? NO CELL PHONE!? No cable Tv? No home internet? Does it mean a part time job every Now and then?

I know you can donate plasma for 400$ a month. Add those things you don t need to live with and an extra 400 a month, you have 7800 a year. 3 years later you can sheep hunt.

It's no different then anything else in life. You will have to sacrifice one thing for another. Obviously no one is saying sacrifice from family to go hunt but this stuff shoulda been thought of long before marriage!

APauls, how have you afforded your hunts? Hard work and desire? I'm assuming they weren't given to you.

From: DL
30-Apr-18
Well Mossyhorn hit the nail on the head about the wife taking a $50,000. vacation by herself. Makes a person really stop and think.

From: APauls
30-Apr-18
No nothing given. My most "costly" hunt I've been able to do work exchanges, so no cash out of pocket. Other than that I've really been lucky to do hunts in groups, carpool, use one vehicle type situations where my biggest hunts have all cost me $500-$750. Including gas. I generally do not include food as an expense because I pack my own grocery shop at home, and if I stayed home I would be eating as well.

caribou77 it's OK to disagree with me, I respect and value your opinion. When I refer to people being able to have whatever they want, I think like you do. Yes a person can most likely save every year and over 10-20 years most anyone could save for one sheep hunt. But I am guessing that same person is going to want many other things other than that sheep hunt. My point - maybe poorly illustrated is that you can't have everything you want. Which of us would want to hunt sheep at the cost of hunting nothing for the next 10-20 years? For a lot of people, the sacrifices to accumulate an extra $50,000 are simply too great. I've also built financial stability into my assumptions which includes paying your house down and saving for retirement. That's what I mean. Can anyone do it with enough determination and discipline? Sure. But for a lot of people that might mean, no elk, no other out of province hunts, no new gear, and if you've got to cut out cell phone and gym, dare I say you're at the point you can't afford gas for whitetails. But yes, you can put that one sheep hunt down in 10 years. But you can't have it all. That's what I tell myself so I can stay content so don't burst my bubble!! ;)

From: TXHunter
30-Apr-18
You can’t have it all, but you can sheep hunt without destroying yourself financially or disrupting your family life. Presuming, of course, that your financial and family life is on solid footing to begin with.

A Dall hunt is $20-25K. A Stone’s hunt basically twice that. Those are achievable goals if one wants to sheep hunt badly enough. Both less than a new tricked-out pickup.

Now, I’m not saying everyone does or even should want to sheep hunt enough to make that sacrifice. But, by the same token, no one else has the right to say that others shouldn’t want to make that sacrifice or their choice to do so is somehow wrong.

My first sheep hunt was a significant financial cost. But my wife and kids supported me 100% with my dream. In fact, they were ecstatic for me when I was able to make it a reality. Just as I have supported them with helping their dreams becoming realities.

Again, not everyone is in the same financial boat. And, again, not everyone’s priorities are the same.

And, to put it bluntly, those things are not anyone else’s business.

From: APauls
30-Apr-18
^^^^Exactly why it's tough to get that advice from the internet if it's worth it to go for it or not. Cool thing is, if someone does go for it, maybe they're nice enough to share it with us on bowsite!

From: caribou77
30-Apr-18
^^^ amen to sharing it with us! Lol

I think it's great for everyone to have these dream hunts in life. They make you work harder and improve every part of their life to achieve them.

30-Apr-18
Shriner's Hospital for Children

From: llamapacker
30-Apr-18
I've been fortunate to go on three dall sheep hunts, and many hunts around the world. I don't have unlimited income, of course, but make my hunting trips a priority, and set aside a sizeable (to me) budget each year for my trips. As much as I love sheep hunting (and I do!), a $50K stone sheep hunt isn't my priority. I would rather spend that much money on another dall hunt, an elk hunt, AND a Cape buffalo hunt. So many more varied and lengthy experiences, than just one hunt.

It is also the reason I don't have an African lion, as $50K for that hunt is truly bargain basement for a free range hunt, and most are closer to $100K. As with all things in life and money, it is about what you could do instead. Other hunts are just one of the options.

And to answer the original question, my wife has been asking for several years for a swimming pool that will cost substantially more than a stone sheep hunt. After using all the rational arguments to say NO (and Hell NO!), the excavator will be at my house tomorrow. Not a vacation for her, but it is HER priority, not mine, and after spending more on multiple hunts for many years, it only seemed fair to give her what she wants.

And yes, I don't take these type of expenses lightly. It may even crimp my hunts for one year, maybe not. After all, I prioritize my hunts, and book hunts that I think are worth their price tag.

Bill

From: Ambush
30-Apr-18
Well, that's it!!!! You guys have convinced me to go chase stone sheep this fall!!

Being a pensioner, it won't be easy, but I've been working a few days lately at my old job. That way I don't have to take the $80, otc tag out'a the regular budget :)

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