Sitka Mountain Gear
Broadhead Tuning Questions
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Xbowdoctor95 02-May-18
Ucsdryder 02-May-18
2xLung 02-May-18
Dave 02-May-18
JTV 02-May-18
Xbowdoctor95 02-May-18
Shawn 02-May-18
TD 02-May-18
splitlimb13 02-May-18
BIGHORN 02-May-18
JTV 02-May-18
BTM 03-May-18
ELKMAN 03-May-18
carcus 03-May-18
Shawn 03-May-18
ELKMAN 04-May-18
Bowfreak 04-May-18
carcus 05-May-18
4blade 05-May-18
From: Xbowdoctor95
02-May-18
Ok. So I went and did some broadhead tuning today for an up and coming hunt and it proved to be quite tricky. I actually accidently nudged my rest all the way over at one point! HAHA anyway, I got my broadheads smacking dead center out to 30 and decided to fling a field point before closing shop. It ended up landing high and way to the left, so I tried it a few more times. Same thing. I didn't have a lot of time to futz with it but is this normal? I shoot daily and do 3d so I need my field points hitting the same as my broadheads if possible. Any advice helps. Thanks in advance!

From: Ucsdryder
02-May-18
You might need to change your name. Haha

What bow are you shooting? What arrows are you shooting?

What tuning have you done?

I like to paper tune, then walk back tune, then Broadhead tune.

The problem with moving your sights is that your bow isn’t shooting arrows efficiently, which will suck up penetration.

From: 2xLung
02-May-18
I would suggest starting over. You have something very much out of tune with your bow. Start by checking all your dimensions: ATA and brace height, rest height and fletching clearance. Once those check out, examine cam timing, cam sync, cam lean. From there, I back tune out to 50 yds with field points. Once all that checks out then broadhead tune. Tuning errors with broadheads will start to show at 35 yards in my experience. You may also want to examine your arrow spine (you may be over or under spined). Google “The Nuts and Bolts of Archery” for a good reference on tuning.

When I broadhead tune, I only need very small adjustments in rest or cam lean to get it dialed in. Good luck!

From: Dave
02-May-18
What you have described is not Broadhead tuning at all. Broadhead tuning is tuning your rest and/or nocking point to get your broadheads hitting with your field tips. All you have done is "tuned" your rest to guide your broadheads to hit where your sights are already set. Proper broadhead tuning is a "fine-tuning" that makes very minor adjustments bringing your broadheads together with field tips. Often, you will have to make a sight adjustment after this is complete depending on where the "tuned" POI is. Do a search for "Easton Tuning Guide."

From: JTV
02-May-18

JTV's Link
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQQnc1axz9U

btw, make ANY adjustments in 1/32-1/16" increments ...

From: Xbowdoctor95
02-May-18
I should have given a longer explanation. My bow was tuned. I did some walk back tuning. I also got the field point and broadhead to hit the same spot first. Then it seemed like when I stepped back to 20 that I couldn't get my broadheads to stop hitting right. I'll watch the video and see what happens. Thanks guys!

From: Shawn
02-May-18
I shoot through paper at 12-15 ft. Get a perfect hole or even one showing ever so slightly weak with field points, then sight in at 20 yards. I then screw in a 175 grain VPA broadhead and it hit excatly as my 175 grain field points. I just had my heavier set of limbs put on my Mathews. I thought I may have to re-tune, not at all still a perfect hole. Just had to change sight a tad as I went up 8#s in draw weight. Shawn

From: TD
02-May-18
What Dave said. Broadhead tuning is adjusting the rest to have both broadheads and FP group together. the sights have nothing to do with it other than to be the constant in the tuning experiment. Sights are normally the LAST thing you touch, only after finished tuning. (unless you're running out of target in the adjustment march across the target....)

Make sure you are pretty close to tuned already, shooting paper, bare shaft, etc. Note: tuned and timed/set to factory specs are not the same thing. If not set up right and broadheads spin PERFECTLY..... not going to tune well. Without getting too deep into the weeds, I like to set the rest down the pipe and then use the yokes to get a good paper tune.... but that's a different topic and bow make/model dependent.

Shoot a group of broadheads, then a group of FP (however many you call a group or in any way you want to sacrifice arrows to the Archery Gods......) If they are not grouping together the proper adjustment (normally) is "chase" the FP.... move the rest towards the FP group. I like to get vertical squared away first as it is normally easiest. Then horizontal.

When you move the rest BOTH GROUPS WILL MOVE as well. Don't worry that they don't hit where your sights are, they won't! And unless near the target edge don't touch the sight, keep aiming at the same point throughout the process no matter where they hit. Both groups will move, but the broadhead group should move a bit more than what the FP group moved. Repeat as necessary until the two groups converge, then re-sight the bow.

If the groups will not converge then look to other issues to correct..... form, contact with rest or cables, cam lean, shaft spine, moon phase, argument with wife, etc......

From: splitlimb13
02-May-18
I agree 100% with paper tuning and making sure the timing is dead on. Shoot through the paper at about 8-10 inches away. Oh and throw a Magnus at the end of your arrow ;-) they fly just like a field point ,as does the Exodus Swept blade.

From: BIGHORN
02-May-18
What arrow are you shooting and what poundage? Spline could be a big problem.

From: JTV
02-May-18
you mean SPINE .. ;0)

From: BTM
03-May-18
Ditto the previous comments about cam lean and yoke tuning. For years I tinkered only with spine and moving the rest, but it was in vain until I also played with cam lean.

From: ELKMAN
03-May-18
Sounds like some yoke tuning, and some grip analysis may be in order. What is the bow? Also you may want to change your handle/name... LOL!

From: carcus
03-May-18
Why its so important when buying a bow to make sure its got static yokes!!! You only need them when you need them!lol

From: Shawn
03-May-18
I have owned 5 compounds in the last 7 years and I have never had to mess with yoke tuning and cam lean. Sorry it seems like a bunch of just who-ha to me. I will say I have only shot single cam bows except for one Hoyt in the last 20 years, but as I said paper tune for a perfect hole at 12-15ft. and good to go. I have only ever had to mess with the rest and nock point to tune a bow and I shoot fixed blade heads, no mech. shawn

From: ELKMAN
04-May-18
Agreed Carcus!

From: Bowfreak
04-May-18
Shawn,

Yoke tuning is not "ho ha" or whatever you called it just because you don't know how to. No need to yoke tune if you don't care where your arrow tunes.

From: carcus
05-May-18
"I have only ever had to mess with the rest and nock point to tune a bow and I shoot fixed blade heads" Lol, this is exactly why yokes are important! Your rest stays squared and level. Unless you only ever shoot one distance, then go ahead and move that rest

From: 4blade
05-May-18
I've had some single cams with a yoke on top. All I ever did was make sure ata was set even on both sides and they'd shoot the correct spined bare shafts straight to 50 yards. My d340 on the other hand is not like that. I had a bare shaft going nock right at 40 yards hitting the target 3 to 4 inches left. A half a twist in the right side yolks, top and bottom, turned that nock right arrow into a laser at 40 yards. Side to side ata is off 2mm. Yolk tuning definitely works.

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