Sitka Mountain Gear
700 grain arrow build
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Guardian Hunter 03-May-18
JTreeman 03-May-18
Dino 03-May-18
Nick Muche 04-May-18
Barty1970 04-May-18
Guardian Hunter 04-May-18
Pyrannah 04-May-18
Hoytbowhunter 04-May-18
Hoytbowhunter 04-May-18
APauls 04-May-18
Brotsky 04-May-18
Beendare 04-May-18
Russ Koon 04-May-18
x-man 04-May-18
WV Mountaineer 04-May-18
Shawn 04-May-18
Glunker 04-May-18
Glunker 04-May-18
Russ Koon 05-May-18
Russ Koon 05-May-18
Lever Action 12-May-18
Ironbow-cell 12-May-18
Outdoordan 13-May-18
03-May-18
My African guide just informed me that I need a 700 grain arrow for my upcoming lion hunt! Not much time to build it! My arrow is 28 inches shot from a Mathews Triax at 65 lbs. 27 in draw length! Iron will 100 solid Broadhead are tipping the arrow! I just need a few suggestions! Gary

From: JTreeman
03-May-18
If you are looking for an easy quick build I think you could do a FMJ DG in 250 spine (17.7gpi) with 50 grain brass insert and 125 broad head. At 28” that gets you right at 670 if I’m not mistaken. Add vanes and a lighted nock and you should be right in at 700. Quick and easy build if it shoots good for you.

—jim

From: Dino
03-May-18
Widowmaker arrows topped with a 250gr Widowmaker Solid will get u there...Australian company. I used them for my Water Buff hunt there. Quick Google will show u the way. Super tough arrows!!!!

From: Nick Muche
04-May-18
700 grain for a lion sounds very excessive. What's the rationale behind the minimumum weight?

I made a 700 or so grain arrow for a hunt once, took the easy route and stuffed the shafts with weedeater line. Worked just fine and the arrows shot great.

From: Barty1970
04-May-18
If it's South Africa, I believe that there are minimum KE requirements for different game

04-May-18
I believe it is excessive as well but it is their requirements. Not much wiggle room as I understand a SA government representative must go along with us as well! I can't risk not having the correct arrow if this is true. G

From: Pyrannah
04-May-18
Sounds like a crazy hunt!! Good luck man!!

I hope you share the story with us when you get back!?!?

04-May-18
For my arrow I used a 300 spine Easton FMJ dangerous game 28 in arrow at 80lbs. The shaft alone weighed 465gr then I did a 75gr brass insert to get it to 540gr. I decided to use a 100gr Broadhead because I wouldn’t be as limited, this put me at 640 and with wraps and vanes i think the total weight was 670gr, that’s what the scale said. If I did 125gr I would have been at a little over 700. Keep in mind there are 200gr and 315gr broadheads. A 700gr arrow at 65lbs is going to be extremely slow. My 80lb nitrum turbo is shooting a 670gr arrow at 245fps.

04-May-18
The only other thing I can think of Is weigh your arrow up with more than one brass insert if you really want to use that Broadhead. Try and get your weight up as much as you can.

From: APauls
04-May-18
Iron Will also has heavier heads you can swap to and get that overall weight. Of course you need to spine up to match heavier up front weight regardless of how you build it.

From: Brotsky
04-May-18
Out of your rig I would shoot a .300 Easton FMJ dangerous game at 29" with a 200 gr Iron Will up front. Add the nock, blazer vanes, and HIT insert and you will be at 707 gr with an arrow that should shoot great out of your set-up.

From: Beendare
04-May-18
You can get different weight arrow tubes at 3 rivers archery that fit the std 6mm and 5mm sizes. The advantage to these is they don't change arrow spine much. It might be possible to bump up the arrow you use now.

3 rivers also sells a FP test kit ranging from 100ge to 300gr [I think] So if you want to manipulate your FOC or better....test for perfect arrow flight with different weight tips before completely committing.....its a fast easy way to do that.

I can tell you, if you use the heavy tubes you need to glue them in or they can blow out your inserts and noks.

From: Russ Koon
04-May-18
A few years back when I was experimenting with heavy arrows, I built some GoldTip 75/95's filled with some household electrial wiring. I believe it was one side of a shielded 10/2 w/grd that I stripped from a scrap length to yield one side of the rubber-coated line.

I cut it to the length of my carbon shaft minus the depth needed on both ends to permit the inserts.

The fit was perfect for the ID of the GT's, .246", IIRC. Difficult to shove into the shaft, but figured it would pull through more easily.

Dropped a heavy thread through from the point end of the shaft, took a half dozen wraps around the insulated wire and pulled the lightly lubed (margarine rubbed and wiped) wire up through the shaft 'til it was the right depth to just allow for the threaded insert. The assembly went smoothly with the nock just filling the space left for it on the other end.

Total arow wieght came out to allmost excactly 750 grains, which was a gain of just a few more than 600 over the unfilled GT with fletches nock inserts and point.

Shooting it from 65# single-cam Browning at the time was interesting, but not dramatic.

I was looking for some dramatic increases in penetration on various targets, but found very little on any of my targets that were stopping my unweighted arrows within six or eight inches of average depth. There WAS a very noticeable difference in the distance the weighted arrow would continue when shot at a slight angle to the grass and allowed to slide to a stop. It consistently went much farther than the empty arrows shot at the same angle.

I had intended to rig some other test media like ballistic gel to get a more scientific answer as to hunting penetration to expect, but never got around to doing so.

The arrow flight seemed pretty much unaffected by the weight change, except for a very noticeable difference in speed. Penetration on my regular assortment of targets (foam blocks, excelsior bales, and dirt banks) was approximately the same.

My overall take from the experiment was that the extra penetration gained would be mostly found in soft tissue penetration that would have very little effect on the bow's effectiveness in making clean kills on deer and smaller game, and that the flatter trajectory would be of more benefit to me in placement. Might consider weighting another arrow like that to go bowfishing, but otherwise probably not. But it did seem to be a perfectly reasonable and inexpensive diy solution to the problem if the weight WAS needed, either for the hunt conditions or for regulations, or both.

After several sessions of shooting the weighted GT and noting the results, I decided to remove the weight and check for any movement that might be evident as having occurred during testing. There did see to have been a very slight compacting of the wire, as shown by a slightly wrinkled appearance at the ends, but there was no effect that I could detect on accuracy. I had readjusted the twenty pin for height and used it during the target shooting sessions, with no other adjustment needed. Of course my original spine stiffness was considerably overspined according to the charts for my 65# and 29", but I always found overspined hunting arrows to be my choice for consistent accuracy under hunting conditions. YRMV if your normal shafts are more closely aligned with the recommended ones.

From: x-man
04-May-18
Russ,

Take that heavy arrow to the pool and shoot at a 45 degree angle. I think you will find that the heavy arrow will travel farther than the light arrow by a large margin.

Water isn't a "perfect" media, but it is much closer to animal insides than foam or other normal target media.

04-May-18
Just stuff the arrow you are currently using with rope or weed eater line. You can get weight tubes as well. No sense in dropping $300 on a different arrow setup when $12 would fix the one you got.

From: Shawn
04-May-18
Dangerous game in .300 spine cut to 28"s(460 grains) than add a 75 grain brass inserts and a 175 grain VPA head, put on a lighted nock(20 grains) and a 7" wrap and your vanes of choice and you will easily be over 700 grains. It should have ya right around 745 grains give or take. Shawn

From: Glunker
04-May-18
First thing to use would be a heavy broadened, then go to a brass insert, then go big fletch to stabilize it. 4 blazers or 4 fletch 4 or 5" feathers.

From: Glunker
04-May-18
Duplicate post

From: Russ Koon
05-May-18
x_man, I agree. The penetration difference seemed much more evident on the "softer target" of damp grass. Didn't have any other targets of low resistance to use for comparison at the time, but we had done some bowfishing years ago and used both solid fiberglass fish arrows and our regular aluminums that we shot at that time. The ability to hit with less deflection and to penetrate the carp and gar were very noticeably improved by the heavier arrows. Always figured they would be, but we tried it both ways just to verify the expected outcome.

On the later experiments mentioned above, I was just trying to quantify the penetration advantage with heavy arrows to judge whether the loss of trajectory and a wider pin gap would be repaid by a sizeable difference in penetration on medium sized game. It does seem to make a lot of difference whether the target media is dense enough to make a very sudden stop or if it's softer.

My own choice in arrows for deer and anything heavier that I have had the opportunity to hunt has been a heavier and stiffer arrow than many guys prefer. And there have been a few times when it has made the difference between a clean kill and an "iffy" recovery prospect. So I was already somewhat in the heavier-is-better camp, but checking to see how far to push the envelope in that direction.

IMO, since the majority of well-hit deer are pass-throughs, the penetration advantage would be often wasted for most of us. Would be more critical for lighter draw bows and tougher game. Probably very critical for dangerous African game. The flat trajectory would not likely be of much benefit shooting from a hide at a waterhole, either, so the heavy arrow would almost certainly be a good idea even if not required for the OP's African adventure. Didn't mean to imply otherwise.

I think Pat's experiments while checking out various arrrow weights and head designs prior to his cape buffalo hunt a few years ago verified that it was a REAL good idea to have a heavy and sturdy setup if you were going to need to penetrate heavy muscle and ribs to get to the heart and lungs. Different critters and circumstances require different value "weights" when comparing the relative aspects.

From: Russ Koon
05-May-18
x_man, I agree. The penetration difference seemed much more evident on the "softer target" of damp grass. Didn't have any other targets of low resistance to use for comparison at the time, but we had done some bowfishing years ago and used both solid fiberglass fish arrows and our regular aluminums that we shot at that time. The ability to hit with less deflection and to penetrate the carp and gar were very noticeably improved by the heavier arrows. Always figured they would be, but we tried it both ways just to verify the expected outcome.

On the later experiments mentioned above, I was just trying to quantify the penetration advantage with heavy arrows to judge whether the loss of trajectory and a wider pin gap would be repaid by a sizeable difference in penetration on medium sized game. It does seem to make a lot of difference whether the target media is dense enough to make a very sudden stop or if it's softer.

My own choice in arrows for deer and anything heavier that I have had the opportunity to hunt has been a heavier and stiffer arrow than many guys prefer. And there have been a few times when it has made the difference between a clean kill and an "iffy" recovery prospect. So I was already somewhat in the heavier-is-better camp, but checking to see how far to push the envelope in that direction.

IMO, since the majority of well-hit deer are pass-throughs, the penetration advantage would be often wasted for most of us. Would be more critical for lighter draw bows and tougher game. Probably very critical for dangerous African game. The flat trajectory would not likely be of much benefit shooting from a hide at a waterhole, either, so the heavy arrow would almost certainly be a good idea even if not required for the OP's African adventure. Didn't mean to imply otherwise.

I think Pat's experiments while checking out various arrrow weights and head designs prior to his cape buffalo hunt a few years ago verified that it was a REAL good idea to have a heavy and sturdy setup if you were going to need to penetrate heavy muscle and ribs to get to the heart and lungs. Different critters and circumstances require different value "weights" when comparing the relative aspects.

From: Lever Action
12-May-18
You are shooting my specs on everything. My arrow is a XT400 @ 28.5". Head weight is 400 grains (Vintage meathead w/200grn steel insert). 50 grain aluminum insert. 2" (2219) aluminum footing. 740 grains I believe it was.

From: Ironbow-cell
12-May-18
I have put 1916 aluminum inside 2219's, a 2117 inside a 2419, shot 2220 Golden Key arrows and played with other set ups. Some of them exceeded 1000 grains with a 160 grain head. My 100# Golden Eagle shot them at 189 fps. Always wanted to go shoot an elephant and get a pass through.

From: Outdoordan
13-May-18
I used weight tubes to get to 700+ after very lackluster performance using a 50# longbow last summer. I shot and lost 2 blacktails at less than 20 yards with 480 grain arrows. Now, after shooting the 700+ grain arrows into my target, I am a believer. https://www.3riversarchery.com/3rivers-archery-arrow-weight-tubes.html

  • Sitka Gear