Summit Treestands
Cheap PH Meters
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Ambush 20-May-18
mgmicky 20-May-18
Fuzzy 21-May-18
grubby 21-May-18
Ambush 21-May-18
grubby 21-May-18
t-roy 21-May-18
drycreek 21-May-18
From: Ambush
20-May-18
Searching through some of the threads here looking for opinions on soil testing and have learned that, A) I'm one of those guys that just plants and wonders why some stuff grows great guns and others crops are basically "still born". And B) I will never take it to the level many good plotters do.

I live in north central BC and it is not agricultural land, mostly hay and beef pasture. Where my one food plot is in the bush, parallel to and above a creek ravine and pretty marginal soil, I've had a few fantastic crops of brassicas but then the clover takes over thick and that means too much spring/summer bear activity. It seems turnip, radish, beets and kale are the hot items, but that is fall and winter.

I have one end of my long skinny plot, about a third of the area, that grows nothing, after repeated tries. Some weeds come back and maybe two percent of the intended crop struggles along pathetically. Although I can't imagine the soil is much different than the other two thirds, I have to believe it is. That plot also gets the most sunshine.

We have little to no ag support services in the area. So I'm wondering if anyone has any insight on the soil test meters that are available from Amazon and the like. I do fertilize but will almost for sure not lime. But perhaps a rudimentary soil analysis could help with what to plant.

I'm also dealing almost entirely with bush mule deer and the does and fawns utilize the plots heavily as cold weather approaches and well into winter if we get enough snow before very cold temps. But I'd like to start a perennial crop that has some early spring benefit to the pregnant does and carry over fawns.

From: mgmicky
20-May-18
I work in the turf/ornamental side of agronomics and carry this in my truck. https://growershouse.com/accurate-ph-7-soil-ph-moisture-meter. I wouldn’t base a golf green program on the results of this device, but for the average home lawn or food plot it works just fine. It will give you an accurate enough reading to determine if you need lime or not. FYI, MOST plants grow best in the pH range of 6-7.5. Make sure you know what the pH preference is of your intended crop before spending time and labor on lime.

From: Fuzzy
21-May-18
Before you buy off Amazon, check out Forestry Suppliers and Ben Meadows Supply.

From: grubby
21-May-18
I checked mine against my soil sample and it reads the same. Its the Fylina PH meter, 10.99 on amazon

From: Ambush
21-May-18
Thanks guys. I ordered the Fylina from Amazon. I’m starting to feel like a real Plotter.

My wife says the way I already bitch about the weather, seed and fuel costs, I could be a farmer now!

From: grubby
21-May-18
I feel like one every day.

From: t-roy
21-May-18
$10.99 is the cheapest thing you’ll buy in the “foodplotting” game!! ;-)

From: drycreek
21-May-18
I might have to purchase that little item to go along with my "soil" thermometer, which is really a meat thermometer. But temps are temps, meat or soil, right ? :-)

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