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Removing elk tenderloins
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
bigmartbowhunter 24-May-18
Topgun 30-06 24-May-18
bigmartbowhunter 24-May-18
WapitiBob 24-May-18
midwest 24-May-18
bigmartbowhunter 24-May-18
IdyllwildArcher 24-May-18
bigmartbowhunter 24-May-18
HDE 24-May-18
joehunter 24-May-18
WapitiBob 24-May-18
HDE 24-May-18
ElkNut1 24-May-18
Native Okie 24-May-18
Matt 25-May-18
BULELK1 25-May-18
Pigsticker 25-May-18
goelk 25-May-18
AndyJ 25-May-18
bigmartbowhunter 25-May-18
Cheesehead Mike 25-May-18
HDE 25-May-18
Matt 25-May-18
Don K 26-May-18
ground hunter 26-May-18
HDE 26-May-18
loopmtz 26-May-18
Kurt 26-May-18
Lost Arra 26-May-18
Mossyhorn 26-May-18
Matt 26-May-18
24-May-18
For years we always removed tenderloins from the side, reaching in and cut and pull them out, worked well. We were introduced to a new, easier,safer way. cut the spine in half pull it back exposing the entire tenderloin. Worked great on the last 4 bulls, however we noticed that those great tenderloins were not the same, we marinated them the same way in Italian dressing but the taste was not good. Is it possible that the spinal fluid was contacting the tenderloins and causing the bad taste. Has anyone had the same experience

From: Topgun 30-06
24-May-18
Why would that be easier than taking the tenderloins out the normal way?

24-May-18
We just pop the spine at the 5th rib and pull back, and you get the whole tenderloin reducing the chance of cutting yourself or piercing the stomach. Either way works fine just was curious about the taste difference.

From: WapitiBob
24-May-18
Testing showed cwd prion is present in the cerebrospinal fluid of infected Elk. I'm going to continue to take them out the side.

From: midwest
24-May-18
I see what you're saying, now. At first, I thought you meant you were splitting the spine length ways. :-/

24-May-18
you just cut the spine at the 4th or 5th rib and pull back, you will have to wack a couple ribs and it just pulls back exposing all the tenderloins.

24-May-18
I use the gutless method and pull them out from the back. It's not that tough.

24-May-18
I use gutless also, I am not saying its tough. I am asking about the possible taste difference.

From: HDE
24-May-18
Good idea actually, the hind legs are already removed and I seriously doubt prion's are causing the odd flavor. Not rupturing enough spinal cord to cause the goofy taste either.

From: joehunter
24-May-18
I agree with Wapitibob - I would not be cutting through the spine. No way - I do not like cutting through the skull cap into the brain, but have to do that to get the antlers off. So easy to push in behind the last rib and pull them out.

From: WapitiBob
24-May-18
I would guess the taste is from marrow or fluid of some sort.

From: HDE
24-May-18
It ain't like they got cooties, besides, there are other places to avoid in the meat you likely pack out and handle - maybe even ingest...

From: ElkNut1
24-May-18
Wapitibob & joehunter X2

ElkNut/Paul

From: Native Okie
24-May-18
Gutless, clip right at the short ribs on deer or elk is hard to beat.

From: Matt
25-May-18
I do the gutless method, but have occasionally done a really quick/partial gutting to get the tenders. Takes the pressure off and keeps the guts from pushing up through the hole.

From: BULELK1
25-May-18
I bone the meat off--gutless and then take the skeleton and try and face if down hill, even a pinch of down helps move the guts away from the TL's and then I just cut in and get 'em out.

Enjoy

#LovinLife

Robb

From: Pigsticker
25-May-18
Are we not overthinking this? I can have tenderloins out in about the same that I can split a backbone and if you say the meat taste different I really do not care what the cause of it. I would just go with the tried and true method that produces the best quality of meat.

From: goelk
25-May-18
Here is my take, think about the knife you use to cut thru the spine and now you are are taken out the tenderlion. A very good chance of cross contamination.

From: AndyJ
25-May-18
What is the taste difference? Is it gamey or just different. If it is different, how so? I will say this, in my experience elk tenderloins are always really tender, but I have had a few that were so gamey I could barely choke them down even when the rest of the meat was really good.

25-May-18
That could be the case, we were always used to great tasting and tender. maybe we just got a couple gamey ones. the rest of the meat was wonderful.

25-May-18
I agree, tenderloins can have a stronger flavor at times...

From: HDE
25-May-18
If you do it right, all your cutting is a vertebrae disk...

From: Matt
25-May-18
"If you do it right, all your cutting is a vertebrae disk... "

So you can cut through the bone and displace it without spilling any spinal fluid? I am struggling to understand how that works.

From: Don K
26-May-18
Living in a CWD zone I would not even mess with cutting a backbone. Its not the "Cooties" one has to wonder, or worry about. But its your elk, you can process it any way you want

26-May-18
my question who in their right mind, would put Italian seasonings on elk tenderloins,,,,,,

From: HDE
26-May-18
I understand the situation of a CWD zone, but in the areas where it is not one is where the "cooties" mindset comes from. So, in a CWD zone, do you also extract all lymph nodes and glands from the meat before boning it out via the "gutless method"? What about at home when you cut it up/grind it up and put in the freezer?

As far as "spilling" spinal fluid, you cut the disk past the end of the tenderloin, break the backbone or fold it backward by pulling it away from the carcass - essentially cutting the carcass in half the way a typical beef is quartered in a meat plant. The spinal cord wouldn't rupture if all your doing is pulling the lower half far enough away to easily access the tenderloins. This way you don't have to constantly push the stomach/intestines down the entire time you are cutting out the tenderloin when doing the "gutless method".

From: loopmtz
26-May-18
x2 ground hunter! lol

From: Kurt
26-May-18
From our BC Limited Entry Hunting Regulations Synopsis for 2018-2019: "Bone out meat from your animal. Don't saw through bone if you can avoid it, and avoid cutting though brain or spinal cord. Minimize handling of brain and spinal cord. "

Note that we are not a CWD province, but why "cut the cord" if you can avoid it, especially while still removing meat? Obviously we often detach the head or saw off the antlers so we do violate the recommendations above, but I ensure my meat is bagged first before I start messing with the spinal cord or brain.

From: Lost Arra
26-May-18
Can I assume that those concerned with spine bones don't keep an elk neck roast? I usually just bone it in the field for grind but a deer neck roast is one of my favorite cuts.

A small deflation hole (poke it with a knife point) in the bottom of the stomach will deflate it and make the tenderloins more accessible while doing gutless especially on the second side.

From: Mossyhorn
26-May-18
Per Kurt’s post... I’ve read the same recommendations that state not to cut through brain or spinal tissue with a saw. I know this deviates from the main topic of tenderloins. But I don’t know how real with the head anymore. How do you remove “all tissue” from the skull, in the field? How do you bring a skull home for a euro mount, based on how the states write these rules?

From: Matt
26-May-18
Seems easier to partially gut an elk than cut the backbone. It takes less than a minute and you don't need a saw.

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