Mathews Inc.
Everything done right, almost!
Turkey
Contributors to this thread:
Paul@thefort 27-May-18
Bowboy 27-May-18
Bowboy 27-May-18
PushCoArcher 27-May-18
Bob 27-May-18
midwest 27-May-18
stick n string 27-May-18
drycreek 27-May-18
fastflight 27-May-18
Paul@thefort 27-May-18
Paul@thefort 27-May-18
Charlie Rehor 27-May-18
Bowboy 27-May-18
elkmtngear 27-May-18
drycreek 27-May-18
midwest 27-May-18
buzz mc 28-May-18
Butternut40 28-May-18
cnelk 28-May-18
Hawkeye 28-May-18
Paul@thefort 29-May-18
From: Paul@thefort
27-May-18

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
While we are on the topic of late season turkey hunting, let me tell you the story of my last turkey hunt other day in the Panhandle of Nebraska.

This was on the third day and the first two days of the hunt in one location, I had a close encounter with a tom and his three hens the very first day but only could get within 100 yards of them. The second day, no birds around. I was relying on a natural blind and just two hen decoys and my Heads Up decoys if needed.

So on the third day I decided to travel 30 miles to a new spot where I had hunted in the past and where I had seen birds and sort of knew their pattern of movement around the through the bluffs and adjacent pastures. So I get to the parking lot at late afternoon, setup the spotting scope and with in a few minutes (4pm) see a tom a mile away in full strut with four hens. Later another tom joined the group and just seemed to follow along letting the other tom be the dominant one. At near dark, the flock headed up out of the pasture and into the roost area, the two toms separating themselves.

I get up at 3 am the following morning and was on my way at 3:30, with back back, food, water, and one upright hen decoy and compound bow. Sunrise at 5:30 but it would take me an hour to get there and I still hand to figure out exactly where they were and then find a good natural hide. I hiked the two rut road, crossed a stream, climbed down and through a deep gully and the crossed 400 yards of rolly pasture. I get there still in the dark but the eastern sky is starting to light up. Minutes later the first gobble, and then another and then more. One tom was up ahead and closer and then other was farther away but higher up in the timber. The closer one ,200 yards, must have gobbled 20 time before he flew down on the other side of a low hill. He hit the ground and kept gobbling but he was heading away and to the east. Fifteen minutes later I see him on a far ridge 500 yards away, still gobbling. I do believe this was the same "loud mouth" tom I had see and heard during the other trips here. Later he went over the rise and disappeared from sight. His gobbles faded.

The other toms did gobble a few times, he was higher on the ridge and must have been with the hens as I heard one yelp a few times. They all flew down, stayed in the trees and then headed up into the bluffs. I called to him and he would gobble back every time but an hour later no responses were heard. At least he knew a hot hen, ME, was in the area and maybe he would come later to investigate.

Natural blind! So I find this large, single, four truck cedar tree that had branches that touched the ground. There was plenty of room underneath if I trimmed a few branches and a few shooting lanes. This tree was in the wide open pasture on the side hill, within 200 yards of the tree line, with the nearest other single trees, 50 yards away, and just a few. I would be in the shade all day and could still see up the hill where I expected the turkeys to come from. I set up the single, upright hen decoy 15 yards to my right on a small hill so any turkey coming would see the decoy. Now, only 7:30 am, I settled in to wait all day if needed. I figured that the turkeys had been there the previous afternoon, there was a good chance them might be back later. The wait was on.

9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1 pm, 2 pm, 3 pm, 4:10pm and I had just yelped on the box call ( as I did every 15 minutes, and got a response. Good thing, I had eaten my food, taken three different cat naps, drank half of my water. I called back, a gobble in response but now closer. I peek through the branches of the Cedar and first see a hen 70 yards away, she sees the decoy, and she is heading right for my hen decoy with a mature long beard in tow 30 feet behind her. HERE THEY COME, and the hen would pass within 10 yards of my hide.

From: Bowboy
27-May-18

From: Bowboy
27-May-18
Ok Paul what happen

From: PushCoArcher
27-May-18
Such a tease Paul.

From: Bob
27-May-18
Keep it coming Paul. On a side note my mind read Ford Truck 3 times. Ha !

From: midwest
27-May-18
Waiting patiently, Paul...

27-May-18
Impatiently waiting...;^)

From: drycreek
27-May-18
We don't ask for much Paul, just dead birds is all..........

From: fastflight
27-May-18

From: Paul@thefort
27-May-18

From: Paul@thefort
27-May-18
So the hen makes it to the decoy, shakes of her feather dust and continues to feed.

The tom is coming but still trailing but not in my shooting window yet. Then he decides to make a slight circle away from me and gain some slight elevation but still moving forward. Now out in front moving from left to right through some taller grass. I try to range find him but the grass interferes with the process. . I figure he is at least 20 yards away.

Bow up, arrow on the string, release hooked up, I draw and pick a spot dead center.

Later I was thinking about this. How many times have we planned the perfect ambush, and it never played out for us. The animal was surely invited to the party but must not have read the invitation, and then did not show up. This situation was perfect and here I had a great tom turkey out in front of me. I had made similar shots on toms over the years and this tom should be 'Pot Ready' in a few seconds.

I tightened my finger on the release trigger, and within a nanosecond the arrow reached it's mark.

BUT TOO LOW AND ALL I GOT WAS A HAND FULL OF FEATHERS. It did not take the tom a few seconds to exit the area.

Well, there you go, Everything done right, almost!!!

Actually walking back to the truck I re-lived this hunt and the other two successful turkey hunts I had been on this season, and had no regrets. I had done everything right on two turkey hunts and almost everything right on my last turkey hunt of the year.

my best, Paul

27-May-18
And THAT is why we Bow Hunt. In our own way we bow hunters also enjoy the hunt when it doesn't work out to the conclusion we want. Thanks for the written-up. C

From: Bowboy
27-May-18
Thanks Paul for taking us along on your hunt.

From: elkmtngear
27-May-18
Helluva effort this Season, Paul. Sometimes the Turkeys win.

If we won all the time, it would be boring ;^)

From: drycreek
27-May-18
Good story anyway Paul. Like elkmnt said........

From: midwest
27-May-18
If it was easy, anyone could do it! Sorry you didn't get this one, Paul, but he'll be around to chase next year!

From: buzz mc
28-May-18
Good story Paul. Thanks for sharing.

From: Butternut40
28-May-18
Great season. Thanks for sharing.

From: cnelk
28-May-18
Fun stuff Paul!

Glad you and Trish stopped over today

From: Hawkeye
28-May-18
Great write-up and story as usual Paul. Heck of a season man...congrats!

From: Paul@thefort
29-May-18
Thanks guys, when you are retired and have time to burn, this allows one to get after them more that once. I will just have to eat the last tag and/or let it burn in my pocket. Paul

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