Summit Treestands
Tire chains please dumb down for me!
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
DonVathome 07-Jun-18
Vids 07-Jun-18
Glunt@work 07-Jun-18
smarba 07-Jun-18
GrantK 07-Jun-18
HDE 07-Jun-18
Ambush 07-Jun-18
Scar Finga 07-Jun-18
cnelk 07-Jun-18
Tjw 07-Jun-18
jdee 07-Jun-18
hawkeye in PA 07-Jun-18
DonVathome 07-Jun-18
Glunt@work 07-Jun-18
ben h 08-Jun-18
Treeline 08-Jun-18
LKH 08-Jun-18
DL 08-Jun-18
Mike-TN 08-Jun-18
hawkeye in PA 08-Jun-18
hawkeye in PA 08-Jun-18
GLP 08-Jun-18
Amoebus 08-Jun-18
smarba 08-Jun-18
LKH 08-Jun-18
BigOzzie 08-Jun-18
elvspec 08-Jun-18
Newhunter1 08-Jun-18
Newhunter1 08-Jun-18
Amoebus 08-Jun-18
leftee 08-Jun-18
Ambush 08-Jun-18
smarba 08-Jun-18
Ski & Skin 09-Jun-18
txhunter58 09-Jun-18
DonVathome 09-Jun-18
txhunter58 09-Jun-18
YZF-88 09-Jun-18
jims 09-Jun-18
DonVathome 09-Jun-18
WV Mountaineer 09-Jun-18
Mathewshootrphone 09-Jun-18
Jim B 11-Jun-18
Royboy 11-Jun-18
Cheesehead Mike 11-Jun-18
JSW 12-Jun-18
CWOotr 12-Jun-18
CWOotr 12-Jun-18
CWOotr 12-Jun-18
CWOotr 12-Jun-18
Paul@thefort 12-Jun-18
MF 12-Jun-18
Cheesehead Mike 12-Jun-18
Mathewshootrphone 12-Jun-18
jdee 12-Jun-18
Nick Muche 12-Jun-18
HDE 12-Jun-18
Paul@thefort 12-Jun-18
fisherick 13-Jun-18
Nick Muche 13-Jun-18
Woodbutcher 13-Jun-18
Woodbutcher 13-Jun-18
Franzen 14-Jun-18
SmokedTrout 14-Jun-18
Wv hillbilly 18-Jun-18
HDE 18-Jun-18
Cocoon Man 18-Jun-18
Cheesehead Mike 19-Jun-18
HDE 19-Jun-18
Wv hillbilly 19-Jun-18
GregE 28-Jun-18
DonVathome 18-Oct-18
Treeline 18-Oct-18
smarba 19-Oct-18
keepemsharp 19-Oct-18
DonVathome 20-Oct-18
hawkeye in PA 20-Oct-18
From: DonVathome
07-Jun-18
I have never used them or even been in a vehicle with them on. Ever.

I need to get some for 3 weeks in the Rockies this November. This will be for mud and snow.

1. Driving a Toyota Tacoma - is there a certain type of chain I need?

2. Do I need two or four?

3. I assume driving on pavement for any length of time is not good?

4. Tips for getting them on (besides not waiting until I need them!)?

5. What brand to get?

6. Any tips or ideas a newbie would not know or think of?

Thanks!

From: Vids
07-Jun-18
Check your owners manual first, there should be information in there.

I would not drive on pavement with them.

Chains will have instructions, but yes put them on in your garage once so you know how it works.

From: Glunt@work
07-Jun-18
Pretty straight forward. Just make sure they are sized right for your tires. Chaining the front will get you out of most places. Chaining all 4 gets you into places you may not get out of :^)

From: smarba
07-Jun-18
Many "newer" trucks are not rated for chains. I'm not an expert but I think anti-lock brakes may be a no-no. They may also not have enough clearance inside the wheel wells.

I have a setof 2 and probably only used them 2x in 20-years. But when you need them they are the bomb. They can be put on after the fact, but yes, easier before. Typically you don't decide they are needed until it's too late and you deal with draping them over the tire and connecting, then tightening them up after the tires turn a bit.

They are sized based on tire size, unrelated to vehicle type.

My experience is adding 2 chains is amazing. 4 makes a truck unstoppable. I've only used 2 personally. Put them on front and your truck can claw and drag its way through almost anything. If you have 4 put them on the back too.

There are "cheap" cable chains that provide some traction (I've never used). There are also true metal link chains that are heavier, more cumbersome, may not have enough clearance in wheel wells, but make your truck climb walls.

Make sure you have a lot of rubber bungee cords to tighten the chains on. You lose and break them and the chain package doesn't come with them.

You don't want to drive on pavement and not much more than maybe 10mph with chains.

From: GrantK
07-Jun-18
any tacoma newer than 05 will only take chains on the back, unfortunate, as said above, since the front is where you want them. get the correct size for your tires, more or less aggressive doesn't seem to make a huge difference in performance, more of a looks thing as far as I can tell... don't drive on pavement, it sucks and you will destroy them quick... if paved roads are your concern think about cables, I think there may be some made that will fit the front of a Tacoma, and they are far more "driveable" on road.

From: HDE
07-Jun-18
Many years of working in oil and gas in the Rockies:

1) most vehicles today (like yours) will only allow them to be placed on the rear tires, not enough clearance for turning on the front fender wells. 2) a set of chains are only needed in case 4 wheel drive goes out.

Rule of thumb: go in with 2 wheel drive, come out with 4 wheel (or rear chains).

Several types to choose from, a good set of mud chains are all you'll need. No need for snow chains (V Bar link). You'll also want steel link chains, not cable - those are for highways.

Check out www.vulcantire.com and look at the SCC Quick Grip series. Another is www.peerlesschain.com, again the Quick Grips. NAPA Auto is also a good source to get them as well.

You have a Tacoma though, one of the best vehicles to be in the hills with, and that is not an opinion.

From: Ambush
07-Jun-18
Is theTacoma 4X4?

Many years hunting and fishing northern B.C. and I got to use chains a LOT! Now I use a quad for that stuff but still carry a good set of high quality V-bars. Used properly, they can really make a big difference in what you can drive out of or through. Best advice is to put them on before you need them. Practice in your driveway!

From: Scar Finga
07-Jun-18
Great Advice Above!!

In most situations you will be fine with cables or chains on the rear. If you want to get extreme, you will need chains on all four, it just depends on where and what you are trying to do.

Good Luck!

From: cnelk
07-Jun-18
Front chains for sure if you can. They will assist in stopping and turning when you need it most.

Back in the day I’d chain up all 4 tires for the late November elk season, drag my 4 horse stock trailer with 2 horses up the mountain with 2’ of snow. I wouldn’t take them off for a week.

I’ve ripped brake lines off, I’ve lost them, you name it.

I’d definitely try them on first. There is an easy way to install and not so easy way.

From: Tjw
07-Jun-18
Put them on before u are stuck..... alot easier. U buy chains for tire size. Had them on 2011 taco no problem.

From: jdee
07-Jun-18
I bought a set of chains from .......vulcantires.com .....about 8 years ago. They have a lot of info on tire chains/cables. I ordered them on Monday and had two sets for a F350 on Thursday.

07-Jun-18
Grantk is correct.

From: DonVathome
07-Jun-18
Great stuff thanks! Good idea to check the owners manual might not of thought of that. Also I would’ve guessed put them on the rear tires only if I was only doing two which works out because that’s all I can.

What it be possible to fit the rubber ones on the front or not worth the time?

From: Glunt@work
07-Jun-18
I'm in the mountains a bit all through the year. Chains are good but I don't have a set for my current truck and rarely used them in past years. Driving places where chains are necessary means you are on the edge of your rigs capability. That translates into being stuck and that translates into wasted hunting time or worse.

Nice insurance but chaining up to get IN somewhere is risky. I look at them for a chance to get out when I screwed up.

From: ben h
08-Jun-18
If you ever need them you'll be pretty surprised how much they help; they'll get you in to and out of some pretty nasty stuff. Les Schaub has a deal that if you buy some and don't end up using them, they'll give you a full refund.

From: Treeline
08-Jun-18
Have run chains on Chevy’s and toys. They can be a lot of trouble but can also save your bacon. My latest gadget is a set of 4 folding traction mats. Much easier to deal with. Just use them when you get in a bind. Those and a shovel for when you get stuck are all you will need unless you are out chasing lions all winter.

From: LKH
08-Jun-18
Wife's Subrat outback will not take chains. Check with Toyota about what you can do.

I have hundreds of miles with chains on a vehicle. Many on a chevy van, 1970 vintage and the rest on a VW 411 station wagon. Both were truly impressive with chains. After one or two "lessons" we always chained up before the bad stretches.

On a drop camp the outfitter chained the front going up and the rear coming down. We then rode the ditch both ways to keep from sliding off the mountain.

From: DL
08-Jun-18

DL's embedded Photo
DL's embedded Photo
Here ya go

From: Mike-TN
08-Jun-18
Great advice here but Go to YouTube....this is the kind of stuff the internet Elena’s made for. I am guessing there is more than one guy telling you everything you need to know about chains and showing you how to put them on.

08-Jun-18
Chains can make a huge difference. V-bar chains are way better than non V-bar if the going is rough. All chains will reduce what speed you can run on the highway big time and you can ruin a set of chains on the highway in no time. Speed will determine this even with quality chains 30 - 100 miles @ 20 MPH if hitting blacktop even through snow or ice, they can last a life time off road, or on snow, ice if not spun hard.

They will also get you in trouble because you can easily get farther back in. I also highly recommend you carry a spare chain or at least extra cross links and chain pliers for removing/ installing. A small 4x4 6" long will make the easiest installation if your putting them on before stuck. Lay out the chain with quick disconnect on the outside place wooden block between links, drive vehicle up on wooden block and work the chain around tire as tight as possible. You will also needed chain tighteners if going any distance. A small tarp or garbage bag is handy to lay on if the ground is wet or muddy. Warning: braking a cross link can rip off brake lines, and all the sensors/electronics on newer vehicles, etc. and cause huge amounts of body damage. Like the look of those Nordic chains.

08-Jun-18
Chains can make a huge difference. V-bar chains are way better than non V-bar if the going is rough. All chains will reduce what speed you can run on the highway big time and you can ruin a set of chains on the highway in no time. Speed will determine this even with quality chains 30 - 100 miles @ 20 MPH if hitting blacktop even through snow or ice, they can last a life time off road, or on snow, ice if not spun hard.

They will also get you in trouble because you can easily get farther back in. I also highly recommend you carry a spare chain or at least extra cross links and chain pliers for removing/ installing. A small 4x4 6" long will make the easiest installation if your putting them on before stuck. Lay out the chain with quick disconnect on the outside place wooden block between links, drive vehicle up on wooden block and work the chain around tire as tight as possible. You will also needed chain tighteners if going any distance. A small tarp or garbage bag is handy to lay on if the ground is wet or muddy. Warning: braking a cross link can rip off brake lines, and all the sensors/electronics on newer vehicles, etc. and cause huge amounts of body damage. Like the look of those Nordic chains.

From: GLP
08-Jun-18
Great info given so far! Only thing I would add is I would not put them on a passenger rated tire. ( my 2015 taco came with them) I now have LT rated (light truck) tires on now and would chain up the back. Also have some wire ties for the ends where you hook them together the 4x4 wood is a great idea! Greg

From: Amoebus
08-Jun-18
We were in ID this past fall - drove up to camp in dry and had 8-12" of snow come down on us in 3 days. We chained up all the vehicles and ended up putting chains on the trailer (it kept sliding toward the ravines on corners and the chains helped out that sideways motion).

I agree with the others on getting more bungee cords than you think you will need AND bring wire/zip ties. The big problem is any loose chain links on the inside of the tire will hit/destroy parts of your vehicle - or at the least make repetitive noise. So, put them on as tight as you can muster and drive 10'. Then re-tighten. If you have 3-4 extra links (you will if you are cheap and buy the Fleet Farm variety) take a bolt cutter to get rid of the extras and wire up any that stick out at all. Drive another 10' and re-check.

These steps are much easier to do in the yard in the summer than in a blizzard in the mountains.

From: smarba
08-Jun-18
Yep...chains will help you get WAY farther back before you get stuck ;o)

From: LKH
08-Jun-18
Hawkeye, great idea! Both times I read it! Why didn't you tell me this 45 years ago????

From: BigOzzie
08-Jun-18
I pack chains all winter, and have only needed them a few times. Depending on where you are going some of the tire shops in the Rockies have chains you can buy and return if you do not use them. This is a good plan because it is rare you will need them, and the next set of tires you buy may not be the same size and then you have to modify your chains or hang them in the shed and buy another set. I just went up a tire size on my truck and had to hang out the old chains and buy new ones. If you walk in the tire shops they have canvas bags with a set of chains in them that are marked by tire size and likely the appropriate cross member design.

Everyone has their own version of how to install. Mine works for me but many argue that it is easier their way. As for that Watch some videos and hope you don't have to do it.

oz

From: elvspec
08-Jun-18
"take a bolt cutter to get rid of the extras" THIS. The chains I've used in the past have a bit of extra length at the ends in order to accommodate varying tire sizes so they need to be trimmed accordingly. I learned the hard way on my first set by not doing this until I needed them. I was in the high country in deep snow and had to cut the links off using a tire iron and a rock for a hammer. This was in the middle of the night and no fun. So definitely size them in the driveway and only use them off-road.

From: Newhunter1
08-Jun-18

Newhunter1's Link
I don't have chains. My F150 is a 2012 4x2. What I use is the link above. Trac Grabbers. Mine are 9" (L) x 3.5" (W) x 1.5" (Depth) and boy do they work. I went to my son's scout camp last month...it rained 4 days prior and during the camp. I was turning around in the camp when my truck started sliding down a steep hill. I had just went over the top and the back of the truck started sliding sideways and then down. I stopped just short of a tree. All I could do was spin my tires and nothing more. I put these four grabbers on and was able to power my way out and leave two deep ruts. Now because of the force used, I had to use a hammer to move the grabbers to a position where there was some play in the material. However, since the straps are flat I don't have to worry about putting chains on my tires, and it flat out works.

From: Newhunter1
08-Jun-18
Course I'm not taking my truck down a trail that a mountain goat would think twice about either...but I have gotten stuck hunting and scouting because I thought the ground wasn't as solid as I thought.

From: Amoebus
08-Jun-18
I forgot to answer the rest of your questions.

I got mine at Carid.com. I got a pair of Pewags that were for my exact tire and still had to trim them so I got a second pair from the farm store. My FJ had only chains on the rear (manual says to not put them on the front) and I had less traction that the other vehicles with chains on all 4 tires. Next year the chains will be in all 4 tires - if we get that amount of snow.

Get them working now!

From: leftee
08-Jun-18
Trac grabbers work pretty well.Have saved me a couple times.

From: Ambush
08-Jun-18
Always leave about four extra links on the chain length!! There will be times where you cannot get them done up otherwise and then they are useless. The cam lever latch does NOT have to go on the end link (not sure why elvspec had to). Haywire the tail end of the extra links back to the chain. I've drove a lot of miles, off road, with chains on all fours like this. On newer vehicles with less clearance, the cross bar length is more critical. You don't want much wrap because of lines and senors on the inside. You can also buy bungee "Spiders" just for chains. Double them up. Quality chains can literally be a life saver. Learn how and when to use them.

I also have a set of the blocks that newhunter linked to. Though strictly for mud, they also work. Easy to carry and put on. but definitely not for driving any distance.

From: smarba
08-Jun-18
Agree Ambush - you don't necessarily have to cut the chain ends to length: just bungee cord them so they aren't flailing around inside the wheelwell. If you need to put chains on AFTER you're stuck in snow or mud sometimes it's all you can do to get the latch onto the longest end of the chain. Of course you'll want to adjust and tighten them up later, but if you can't even get the chain connected it's hard to get yourself unstuck.

From: Ski & Skin
09-Jun-18
Your going to Nevada?? It wont snow, rain or anything!!!!!!! Climate change!!!!

From: txhunter58
09-Jun-18
As stated, best place to put chains is the front tires because that is where the weight is and for steering. That said, the engineers that designed a 4 wheel drive truck that can't take chains on the front should be shot and quartered! On my F150 I have some Vbar chains for the back and some low profile cables for the front.

You might check with your local dealer and see if you can put some low profile ones on the front of your truck. The owners manual is CYA and in reality, it might be OK with some brand of low profile ones. Worth checking. Or go on some 4x4 sites and see what they say there, but always check it out in multiple places, because you don't want a torn brake line in the boonies!

From: DonVathome
09-Jun-18
Waymore really good information here and I would’ve ever expected thank you very much! One of the most informative threads on bowsite I’ve read in many years

From: txhunter58
09-Jun-18
Here you go! http://americantracktruck.com/

Actually I wish I could afford these. We have land that can only be accessed by snowmobile in winter. It would be great to just go up there on these!

From: YZF-88
09-Jun-18
I've used RUD Grip 4x4 chains a few times to save my rear. Easy to put on and have low clearance on the sides where some trucks might have issues.

Man those hard packed roads get scary greasy in the rain. I went a more expensive route and bought a 4 wheeler to safely get me in there now!...and I bought chains for that too!

From: jims
09-Jun-18
I would definitely have an ATV or 4 tire chains (plus spare chains) if you are heading to the unit I'm pretty sure you are going to in Colo! You will be dealing with the worse gumbo mud plus snow you've seen in your life (if it gets wet). Chains work best on the front due to the added engine weight plus that's where you steer.

The reason you need 4 chains is because there are lots of steep slopes and sidehills with solid gumbo. If you only have chains on the front your rear end will fishtail downhill and you may end up with 4 tires in the air and a flattened roof! If you only have chains in the rear it will likely be super tough to steer. The tires get coated with gumbo so have virtually 0 traction...even in 4 WD. First thing in the morning things may be somewhat frozen (if it gets cold enough at night) but it may warm up and get super sloppy later in the day. I've seen 1 to 2' ruts of gumbo/snow during the late season hunts in those units. You never know from year to year what will happen with the weather.

If it were me I would buy or rent an ATV. You could always buy a used ATV on Craigslist and sell it after your hunt! You'll be able to access a lot more country and your truck will thank you! Be prepared to do a lot more hiking and not having as much access to remote country without an ATV. If things get wet you'll be wondering why you didn't bring an ATV or 4 tire chains!

From: DonVathome
09-Jun-18
Treeline any pics of the 4 folding traction mats? I think bringing anything similar might be nice. Maybe just some 3/4" plywood with roof shingles securely attached? Small pieces hoping they will not break. Or something with traction that is sturdy and flexible? Would take up almost no room.

09-Jun-18
Follow Jim’s advice. Get an arc, save the truck. New trucks are not made for front tire chains. Without chains on the front, you truly don’t get the benefit of chains when it’s bad enough to need them.

An ATV will get it done. No side by side. To big and heavy. I’d personally find a 400-500 cc ATV and out fit it with a box on the back rack. That’s your best option

09-Jun-18
I like pewag chains cross link

From: Jim B
11-Jun-18
I use the RUD grip 4x4's but as stated,check,because you probably can't put them on the front.Mine is a 2006 and I got away with it several times but also pulled a brake line off twice and had to drive more than 15 miles with no brakes.The manual even says no cables.I now only run them on the back and they definitely make a difference but chained on all 4's is best,if you can.If you decide to ignore the manual,have a plan for getting back with no brakes.You may be able to use them if you install wheel spacers but haven't done it,myself.Do your homework.

From: Royboy
11-Jun-18
Ran chains a lot driving my Ups truck for 27 years. Get them as tight as possible then use bungees to make them tighter and you may have to tighten after a short distance.

11-Jun-18

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
In 2016 I was elk hunting opening weekend of rifle season in Wyoming. I parked my camper near a trailhead a couple miles off the forest service road. When I went to bed it was snowing lightly. I woke to knee deep snow with my truck pointing up the mountain. If I wouldn't have had a set of chains for my front tires I believe my Chevy HD2500 would have been there until spring. They truly are amazing and it was a hell of a white knuckle ride blasting out of there when I couldn't even tell where the road was!

From: JSW
12-Jun-18
Those nordic armour chains look great but you don't need anything like that. Just like Nathan, I've spend many years on the oil fields during the spring thaw and have plenty of experience. I used to have a '79 Ford F250 with positrac that we used to pull every one out when they got stuck. I can't count the times that I chained up all 4 and hooked up to a dually 4x4 pulling a 10,000# trencher on a trailer and pulled them in and out of all kinds of soupy roads. If you only have 2, put them on front and make sure they are tight so they don't get into the brake lines. Tie up any loose ends so they stay close to the tire. I chained up a few weeks ago on a turkey hunt and you will be amazed at how far you can go. If it is worrisome, chain up the front. If it is really bad, chain up all 4.

From: CWOotr
12-Jun-18
As an Outfitter, I use chains several weeks a year including several special late season December and January elk hunts and mountain lion hunts. Don't mess with anything other than RUD Mud Service chains. You can find them at www.cedarrapidstire.com. They are 30% stronger than typical snow chains. They last me several years and don't break until they wear thin. My staff and I use them any time there is snow on the roads when pulling loaded horse trailers that are heavier than any truck. You can drive slowly on patchy dry stretches of roads for moderate distances without hurting these tough heavy duty chains. Don't get V chains. I have five F-250s and F-350s and we pull lots of horse trailers and do a lot of off-roading. We use four 6" or 9" rubber bungy cords on each tire chain to keep them tight and tie up any extra links with heavy duty cable ties. We never lose any brake lines or hurt the fenders doing this and it is not necessary to cut off the extra links unless you have several extras. Putting chains on the rear axle is better than nothing. Maybe get some cables for your fronts but they will break with heavy use. Buy a Ford and not a Chevy or Toyota next time. I like those brands but you cannot put chains on the front unless you put a lift kit on the truck. Fords are generally ranch trucks and Chevys are farm trucks. Don't even get me started about a Chrysler product although the Cummins is a great engine but...

From: CWOotr
12-Jun-18

CWOotr's embedded Photo
Putting them on
CWOotr's embedded Photo
Putting them on

From: CWOotr
12-Jun-18

CWOotr's embedded Photo
Keep them tight with bungy cords
CWOotr's embedded Photo
Keep them tight with bungy cords

From: CWOotr
12-Jun-18

CWOotr's embedded Photo
Hopefully you don't get stuck and tag out!
CWOotr's embedded Photo
Hopefully you don't get stuck and tag out!

From: Paul@thefort
12-Jun-18

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
GrantK, X10, Tacoma, no chains on the front

From: MF
12-Jun-18
I have always used chains up front with older trucks. Now have a 2013 and manual and dealer say chains on the front will damage differential in 4WD, not so much a clearance issue. Can't see seem to get a straight answer from mechanic friends or some truck forums. Anybody know about this?

12-Jun-18

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
This guy had a similar truck and didn't have any chains but I'm guessing he wishes that he did...
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
This guy had a similar truck and didn't have any chains but I'm guessing he wishes that he did...
I used chains on the front of my 2011 Chevy Duramax and they got me off of the mountain with no damage to the truck.

12-Jun-18
I look a chains to get me out not in to some place .I'll take my ATV in with Trax or chain it up

From: jdee
12-Jun-18
X10..... CWOootr

From: Nick Muche
12-Jun-18
I've used chains on the front wheels of my '13 Tacoma many times. Never been an issue. Putting them just on the back is terrible if you want to steer...

From: HDE
12-Jun-18
Is your '13 Taco stock or does it have a lift?

I put chains on the front when I can. If not, the backs are better than nothing.

When your stuck with all four chained and in 4 wheel drive - your stuck. Been there and have the T-shirt for it.

From: Paul@thefort
12-Jun-18
"Like a 4x4, chains just get you stuck back farther." stated a wise man.

From: fisherick
13-Jun-18
Paul, you are a very wise man. A very true statement.

From: Nick Muche
13-Jun-18
I have a 3" lift, barely anything really. I was told not to use them on the front but after doing it many times over I've seen no issues at all. Chains on front or back certainly help but I'd choose the front everytime if I had to because I enjoy steering.

From: Woodbutcher
13-Jun-18

From: Woodbutcher
13-Jun-18
About 10 years ago I came across 2 guys who had thrown their chains off the front tires of a Brand New Chevy Silverado,I asked if they needed help, they weren't familiar with chains, turns out they hadn't tied down about 6 to 8 inches of slack,beat the heck out of the inner fender, They were wondering what that awful noise was,I tied down the slack, put on their chains and they were on their way

From: Franzen
14-Jun-18
In general a 3" lift doesn't seem like much, but when you are talking damage related to having chains on, I would think that would be quite a bit. I'm just thinking out loud on that though, and don't have any experience.

From: SmokedTrout
14-Jun-18

SmokedTrout's Link
I just took the chains out of the truck about a month ago.

I use V-bars, and would not use on the highway. Or any paved road for that matter.

I like the "Spider-bungie" tighteners instead of regular bungies or a regular circular bungie.

18-Jun-18
Does anyone have experience with chains or cables on a newer gmc? Everything I've found and the owners manual says not to use. The place I'm going next fall requires chains on all four tires to get there. 265/70 r17 tires on a 2013 GMC Sierra

From: HDE
18-Jun-18
We used to run GM exclusively on our field vehicles and could not put chains on the front, just the rear.

Might be able to with a lift though...

From: Cocoon Man
18-Jun-18
I was told that tire spacers or off set rims would allow chains to be used rather than a lift. The problem is more the width of the tire when turned sharply. I was looking at putting wider tires on my jeep and without spacers the front tires would rub when turned sharply. The owners manual on my jeep allowed chains on the front with two tire sizes and the biggest stock tires that the model came with only on the back. Plenty of clearance in the wheel wells the same front and back.. The problem is the clearance on the front end width wise ( tie rods, brake hoses that kind of stuff) . I am no mechanic so one should check with a mechanic on which size tire spacer or offset rim to get.

19-Jun-18
Wv hillbilly,

As I stated above, I use chains on the front of my 2011 Silverado HD 2500 diesel with 265-70-18 tires. I didn't read the owners manual before using them and I didn't have any other options for getting off the mountain if I didn't use them. I did some serious 4-wheeling with the chains on and probably had them on for 10-20 miles. I didn't damage anything...

From: HDE
19-Jun-18
You can usually chain up the fronts on most diesel units. Light duty and 1/2 tons not so much.

Still have two sets for mine that I stupidly traded off...

19-Jun-18
Thanks for the responses fellas. Think I'm gonna order some cables for the front tires and try them out around the house. At least if I bust a brake line in the driveway I can walk home and not loose any elk meat dealing with it.

From: GregE
28-Jun-18
Chain return unused option with Les Schwab is for car chains- not truck

From: DonVathome
18-Oct-18
I got chains and some track grabbers. First I spent a very furstrating hour trying to get chains on with no luck. Package says they are for my exact tire but I am several inches from getting them on. Trak grabbers go on FAST and easy. I have brand new good tires with good deep tread.

Trak grabbers will not fit on the front tires - tire chains will (if I can get them on).

I am debating returning the chains. I have been through a lot with just 4wd and decent tires and it seems like chains will not be needed. Then again there is the CO chain law.

Thoughts?

From: Treeline
18-Oct-18
CO requires chains for semi trucks. “Adequate” snow tires for passenger vehicles.

From: smarba
19-Oct-18
If you can't get the chains on in your driveway in good weather, no way they're going on when you're stuck in mud, slush and snow. Either you're doing something wrong or they are the wrong size for your tire.

If you have the luxury (or foresight) of installing chains BEFORE you get stuck (never happens for me) you can lay them on the ground and drive onto them, then pull them up and connect.

But you should be able to lay the chains over the top of the tire, connect the inside link, then get the outside link to at least clip the last link. Install bungee cords to help take up the slack. After you spin the tires you should be able to adjust the outside to a shorter link and get the chains tightened up. But trust me, the chains need to be sized so you can install them from the top without the ability to drive onto them because you won't be able to do that once you're stuck.

19-Oct-18
I have a brand new F250.....never used the chains on it yet....but it sure looks to me like they will work. Maybe I'll chain up in the driveway this weekend.

I've never had to use them but have been pretty close up in the mountains in Colorado and in ice storms in Missouri. I always have them in the truck.

Mr. CWOotr knows what he talking about......do what he does.

From: keepemsharp
19-Oct-18
Remember my dad saying they chained up the front wheels on the model A's. not for traction but to get them to turn instead of sliding in the deep rut mud roads. Different times for sure.

From: DonVathome
20-Oct-18
Thanks guys and yes I know if I cannot get it now there is no way I can when needed. Going to try again soon. Seemed not even close to working.

20-Oct-18
Make sure all the cross links hooks ( the part that is "crimped" onto the side chain) are all laying flat and all facing the same direction. The chain can pass through itself and cause it to be shorter.

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