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54 Days To Limcroma - Any suggestions>
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Contributors to this thread:
joebuck 26-Jun-18
Buffalo1 26-Jun-18
altitude sick 26-Jun-18
Firehuntfish 26-Jun-18
Eric Vaillancourt 26-Jun-18
Eric Vaillancourt 26-Jun-18
wild1 26-Jun-18
swatmedic 26-Jun-18
BIGHORN 26-Jun-18
AZ~Rich 26-Jun-18
JTreeman 26-Jun-18
JTreeman 26-Jun-18
joebuck 26-Jun-18
Buffalo1 26-Jun-18
Buffalo1 26-Jun-18
t-roy 26-Jun-18
Zebrakiller 27-Jun-18
altitude sick 27-Jun-18
hunting dad 27-Jun-18
Eric Vaillancourt 28-Jun-18
altitude sick 28-Jun-18
Eric Vaillancourt 28-Jun-18
altitude sick 28-Jun-18
Herdbull 28-Jun-18
Dale06 01-Jul-18
From: joebuck
26-Jun-18
In 2016 my son (37) had open heart surgery due to what amounts to a blockage due to an enlarged left ventricle. Both he and I are bowhunting junkies so I decided I would take him on the trip of a lifetime.

In mid-August we will be leaving for 10 days of bowhunting with Limcroma Safari's. I think we're well prepared (Travel Agent - Non Stop Delta...Medical Insurance...Afton Safari House, read everything I could find on Internet, etc.), but appreciate any last minute advice. Right now our wildest dreams see a Kudu, a Zebra, a Gemsbuck, a Blesbuck, 2 Wildebeest, 2 Warthogs, 2 Impala's and a few cull animals. Also might take a side trip if we need a break in the action (hopefully).

Your tips, advice and words of wisdom are appreciated. Thanks!!!

P.S. My son is currently in the hospital as a recent exam revealed his heart is out of rhythm (A-Fib). He'll be injected with some drugs up to 4 times to try and fix the problem and if that doesn't work they'll stop and restart his heart. They seem confident they can get him back in rhythm well in advance of our trip.

From: Buffalo1
26-Jun-18
1. Be clear with the Outfitter/PH what you expectations/ goals are

2. Listen to you PH

3. Have a copy of The Perfect shot. Vitals on African game is different from NA game (more forward)

4. Take camera/video to capture the memories

5. Take a notebook and record your hunt like a daily diary.

6. Relax and have fun.

Best of luck to ya’ll. !!

26-Jun-18
Sounds like you have the Logistics worked out. Non stop is the best for sure. Afton house makes everything a breeze. Cheapest souvenirs there also on your way out. Don’t over pack clothes, if you will be sitting in the blind without a PH take a book on birds and animals so you can ID each and learn about each. IMHO it’s the best trip you can take your family on.

From: Firehuntfish
26-Jun-18
Joebuck,

Feel free to contact me anytime with any last-minute questions or concerns. You could not be in better hands than with the Limcroma team. Safe travels and have a wonderful trip.

26-Jun-18
Buy a good bird book. It is fun to look up the different birds while sitting in a blind. I believe Collins has a good one.

Black shirt or jacket for sitting in a blind.

Extra roll of black tape.

Split your luggage in two so that if either bag gets there you can still hunt.

I am leaving tomorrow and I have one bow and set of arrows in a TuffPak and the other bow and arrows in a Badlands Terra Glide. If either gets there, I am still ready to hunt.

Less clothes than you think you need and more money than you think you need.

Be patient and wait for a great shot.

Have fun.

26-Jun-18
I also take SunRype fruit bars. The food in general is quite heavy. Even the vegetables are smothered in cheese and butter. Raisins are another good Alternative.

From: wild1
26-Jun-18
Sometimes small details can make a big difference:

1. eyedrops (for long flights and a dusty continent.

2. some sort of pain killer, like motrin (lower back pain from long sits - on planes and in blinds).

3. sleep aids, I use Tylenol PM.

4. Some sort of butt pad, some blinds can be rough.

5. ziplock bags, same dusty continent.

6. you can never take enough pictures - also, have a look at African trophy pictures, a lot of guys really don't do well in this category.

7. take time to enjoy the entire experience. Good luck!!

From: swatmedic
26-Jun-18
Hunted at Limcroma with Hannes a few years back. Had a great hunt there with some incredible folks. The are pretty dialed in with their bow hunting program. All very knowledgeable bow hunters. The quality of game is exceptional. I can't agree with the assessment of the food in Africa though. I thought is was amazing and looked forward to dinner each night. You will get to try lots of game meat and they bbq out on the open flame in the bush for lunch and around camp at night. Everything was fresh, and tasty! Back straps and tenderloins, salads, steamed vegetables, desserts from scratch., South African wines.. OMG it was good!

From: BIGHORN
26-Jun-18
Joe, If the plane is not full, try to find four empty seats together and lay down on them before someone else grabs them. It's a long flight and some sleep would be nice. Don't give anyone in the little towns where you may stop ANYTHING or others will mob you.

Get the name and email address of the place that they will send the horns and hides to be processed. Then, email them to find out the name and email address of where they will send your stuff to next. I air transferred mine back to the states. This is very important!!! I sent mine to South Texas Fur Dressers to do the tanning. Know the size of the animals you plan on harvesting. Red Hartebeast are pretty cool animals too.

From: AZ~Rich
26-Jun-18
Sounds like a great trip awaits you both. I would not be worried too much about the dip and pack company. Limcroma uses one that they have worked out logistics (scheduled pickups) with and will make sure you have that info before you head home. The DP is usually a taxidermist as well and will give you the options of mounting trophies there or simply do the DP prepping, permitting, crating and arranging for pick up by the RSA shipping company. Depending on your wishes, you can have everything DP’ed then shipped directly to a chosen tannery in the US authorized to accept African trophies. Nothing is done by the DP taxidermist without you being involved first. I would also be prepared for the possible shot opportunity on a species you were not initially after. If the PH is telling you that it’s an exceptional trophy then I would consider it strongly. You just don’t know what Africa will offer you and many have learned that it pays to be flexible with your wishlist. Lastly, enjoy every moment as it will pass all too quickly. No need to worry about taking a break from the action, you’ll be wishing you had more hunting time and budget. If you can swing it a couple days before or after, touring Kruger is a nice trip to consider and it’s very reasonable. PS the food at Limcroma will be awesome. I always eat too much when there.

From: JTreeman
26-Jun-18

JTreeman's embedded Photo
JTreeman's embedded Photo
My tip is don’t over pack. Figure out what you think you need, then cut it in half. Then you can probably take about 25% or that out too ;) I like to travel light for Africa, it is just such an easy trip. I completely understand taking 2 of everything as suggested above, but I never do. Especially in South Africa, I’m nearly positive if I ever had a serious bow malfunction or loss while in RSA any PH I’ve ever hunted with would have me a suitable replacement in less than a day! The pic is my full kit for 16 days of hunting this year. Everything including bow and 3 dozen arrows in the duffle, and one carry-on. And I could have probably cut that down by about 25%...

Have fun, that is the most important part!

—jim

From: JTreeman
26-Jun-18

JTreeman's embedded Photo
JTreeman's embedded Photo
This is the fun part.

—jim

From: joebuck
26-Jun-18
Thanks so much for all the responses. It's getting me even more pumped for the trip. Hope to share some pictures in the future. Keep the advice/tips coming.

From: Buffalo1
26-Jun-18
Four incidentals I would add: Saline solution for dry nose, skin lotion for dry skin, eyedrops for dry eyes & needle/tweezers/magifying glass for thorns.

From: Buffalo1
26-Jun-18
Jim, that is a nice impala. Glad you gave the wildebeests a "rest !"

From: t-roy
26-Jun-18
We went to Limcroma in 2015. You are in great hands! First class in every aspect.

First, I’d suggest ordering a ribeye steak at Afton House if you are given the option. (One of the best steaks I’ve ever eaten)

Take at least a couple of trail cams with you. It’s fun to see what comes into the waterholes when you aren’t there.

Hannes and one of the PH’s own a dip & pack company and they did an excellent job with our horns/hydes. I wouldn’t recommend having any taxidermy mounts done over there, however, you might look into having a purse or something similar made over there, from one of your skins for your wife if that’s something she’d be interested in. I never even considered saving a warthog skin, but another couple that we met up with at Limcroma’s booth in the states after we got back, the guy’s wife had a purse made from a warthog skin and my wife said it was beautiful. (I’ll let her be the judge on that!). In Capetown, my wife looked at purses made from giraffe, zebra, wildebeest and something else. They were all way cool looking but pretty spendy.

From: Zebrakiller
27-Jun-18
I loved the spot and stalk so if you can hunt a few species that way go for it, good luck I had over July 7th!

27-Jun-18
T Roy reminded me. A trail cam on the bone, hide and gut pile is very interesting. Hyenas, Honey Badgers, etc Video is even better.

From: hunting dad
27-Jun-18
Unless you are planning to go again, take as many animals as you can. Trophy fees are cheaper then a complete second trip.

28-Jun-18
Plan on going again. I don’t know anybody personally that has only gone once. I have been on a trip of a lifetime over 15 times now. It has become an annual event.

I start hunting Cape buffalo on Friday and I have already booked next year for hippo.

Life is good.

28-Jun-18
Eric What set up are you using for Buffalo poundage, arrow brand weight Broadhead etc

28-Jun-18
Bowtech 80# bow Easton FMJ arrows with 100 grain brass inserts and 210 gain silver flame broadheads. The arrows weigh 844 grains.

28-Jun-18
I have Grizzly Sticks Victory’s with brass and 200 grain Maasai fletched Thinking about switching to FMJs and Iron will 200 grains. Now looking at the Valkyrie system. But that system doesn’t build enough weight. I’m only shooting 70# but that current set up produced 86 ft lbs

From: Herdbull
28-Jun-18

Herdbull's embedded Photo
Herdbull's embedded Photo
If possible, hunt out of tree stand. Great viability and allows you to learn what's going at distances and directions not available from a ground or pit blind. Don't overlook the mature eland. You don't need to shoot so close to the shoulder blade of an eland as other plains antelope. Mike

From: Dale06
01-Jul-18
I hunted at Limcroma in 13 and 14. My advice- Carry on plane a small piece of luggage with binocs, rangefinder, passport, camera, cell phone. All you need clothes wise is two pants, shirts, Sox and underwear. Toss your plane clothes in daily laundry and it will be washed for trip home. I used Arron house also I also used Air2000 meet and greet. For two people the cost was about $150. They meet you at your arrival gate and get you through baggage and customs very fast. After 15 hours in the air it was worth it. Make sure the PH knows your trophy expectations and then listen to him when he tells you to shoot or wait. Ask your PH about vital zone on animals, and pay attention. Shoot lots of stuff, you will be amazed at the amount of and different species of game

and non game. I took a transformer that plugged into the cigarette lighter on the PHs truck. It allowed me to charge my I phone (camera) very day. The wall outlets ate camp are not 110v. I took tags with my name and taxidermists name and contact info. Your taxidermists should have some for you. Good luck.

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