Sitka Mountain Gear
Fertilizer Applied Early?
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
BOHUNTER09 22-Jul-18
t-roy 22-Jul-18
buckhammer 22-Jul-18
BullBuster 23-Jul-18
BOHUNTER09 23-Jul-18
Dale06 23-Jul-18
Pat Lefemine 23-Jul-18
Pat Lefemine 23-Jul-18
t-roy 23-Jul-18
t-roy 27-Jul-18
t-roy 28-Jul-18
t-roy 28-Jul-18
t-roy 28-Jul-18
BOHUNTER09 28-Jul-18
t-roy 28-Jul-18
Pat Lefemine 29-Jul-18
t-roy 29-Jul-18
22-Jul-18
This might be a dumb question, my own hunch is that I should be able to do this with little negative consequences. But, there are much brighter and more knowledgeable folks here, so....

I am planting 5 acres of clover at the end of August in a regular food plot that has been well maintained for 11 years, rotated most years.

I am applying 50 bags of 50 lbs each of triple 13. Will use rye grain and oats as a cover crop.

I no longer find myself having enough energy to fertlize, disc, drag, spread seed and cultipack in one weekend.

I have been working on having a clean seedbed as I have disced and sprayed twice since spring. I plan on discing two more times, one next weekend, and then at planting time.

I was thinking of spreading my fertilizer this weekend before discing. I should have very little germinate to use it up, and so I was thinking the fertlizer should be fine until I disc and plant 4 weeks later?

Does this sound feasible to do if we receive no gully washers to cause run-off problems? Spreading the work out would really help me.

Thanks!

From: BOHUNTER09
22-Jul-18
That will work fine. You will have minimal loss

From: t-roy
22-Jul-18
Bohunter09 X2.

From: buckhammer
22-Jul-18
I will be doing the same thing starting this week. Should work fine

22-Jul-18
Thanks men.

From: BullBuster
23-Jul-18
Isn’t 500lbs per ac of 13-13-13 a bit extreme?

From: BOHUNTER09
23-Jul-18
That’s about 65 pounds of each nutrient. Maybe a little stronger than necessary.

23-Jul-18
Yes, the farm was abused for 40 years before I owned it. Intense rotations, liming and fertilization according to soil samples is finally making a difference. Thanks for the concern though!

From: Dale06
23-Jul-18
That fertilizer will not leave in that short period of time. Spread it.

From: Pat Lefemine
23-Jul-18

Pat Lefemine's Link
So you are spreading the fertilizer and letting it sit on the surface for weeks before you till it into the soil?

If that is correct, I would be concerned about volatization of the Nitrogen. If it were me, I'd til-spread-til on the same weekend. If that means waiting then so be it. Hit the link if you are not familiar with this. I did this once and a lot of my N literally vanished into thin air.

23-Jul-18
Pat, No, I plan on spreading it and then discing this weekend. Then disc again for anything that germinated, 3 weeks from now at planting.

Since it will be covered by dirt I do not think I will lose much P or K, as for the N it is going to be a clover plot and it had soybeans in it last year.

Thanks, and your plots look great as always.

From: Pat Lefemine
23-Jul-18
Sorry, missed that. You’re good.

From: t-roy
23-Jul-18
There is a product called SuperU that’s available here in Iowa (not sure about other states). It’s basically urea(nitrogen) that is coated somehow. They claim that it can be spread on top of the ground for several weeks with no rain, and it will not volitize. Not sure that’s a word, but you know what I mean. I used some last year and it seemed to work very well.

From: t-roy
27-Jul-18

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
I picked up about 600 lbs of SuperU at the elevator for some fall plots today.

28-Jul-18

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Just finished covering the fertilizer after broadcasting all 2500 lbs. My neighbor cultivated the field for me before I got there!!! Great neighbor!

So, to cover the fertilizer I pulled my 12'X8' drag harrow. I attached a 6"6" timber to the back, and added another 8'X6" post for weight.

This really smooths and flattens the surface.

Good job Troy!

28-Jul-18

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Just finished covering the fertilizer after broadcasting all 2500 lbs. My neighbor cultivated the field for me before I got there!!! Great neighbor!

So, to cover the fertilizer I pulled my 12'X8' drag harrow. I attached a 6"6" timber to the back, and added another 8'X6" post for weight.

This really smooths and flattens the surface.

Good job Troy!

From: t-roy
28-Jul-18

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Looks good, Frank!

I just finished planting some brassicas down on my river bottom plot that got flooded out this spring. This is my culti-mulcher. It’s, by far, my favorite piece of tillage equipment. It makes an awesome seed bed, except when there’s a lot of trash to contend with.

The river bottom ground finally dried out enough that I could get in and work up 1/2 the field (2acres). There was zero trash on the field, so I hit it once lightly with my field cultivator to open up the scum film that builds up when the river floods, to help it dry out some. Yesterday evening, after spreading the SuperU with my spreader, I incorporated it into the soil with the culti-mulcher, making a smooth seed bed in the process. It was still just a bit tacky and dirt would build up some on the packer wheels, so I decided to wait until this afternoon, to give it some time to dry out, then seeded my brassicas and hit it one last time with the packer to firm the seeds into the soil.

From: t-roy
28-Jul-18

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
The finished product.

28-Jul-18
That looks awesome!! Magazine cover awesome!

Excuse my ignorance, but what is SuperU?

From: t-roy
28-Jul-18
It is urea(nitrogen) that has some type of coating on it to stabilize it and keep it from volitizing or dissipating into the atmosphere. If urea is not worked into the soil fairly quickly, it will, basically, evaporate into the air. Supposedly, SuperU can be spread on the ground and it can sit there for several weeks before it starts to volatize.

28-Jul-18
OK, the big farm operations near me, use it. But I never heard them call it that.

The larger operations use it to give them more time to prepare fields in the spring for corn.

FYI, the farmer closest to me said his yields are 10-15% less than traditional nitrogen applications, but it allows him to farm more ground by spreading the work out. Thanks.

From: BOHUNTER09
28-Jul-18
I’ve used it as a second application on both food plot corn and commercial popcorn. Works best if you can apply it just before a rain. Really gives the corn a boost.

From: t-roy
28-Jul-18
A lot of the farmers here apply anhydrous ammonia in the fall, but some do it in the spring as well. They will often top dress the urea into their standing corn, like BOHUNTER09 is talking about, too. I will on my corn and brassicas as well.

I generally put more down than what I probably need to, Frank, but thanks for the info!

29-Jul-18
You can see how dry our soil is from the picture above. We are in a very localized drought, the neighbors tell me the worst since the 1980s.

We received a little over one half inch last night! Maybe more to come. There are still huge cracks in the soil.

Over the last 12 months I believe I have put more sweat moisture in the ground than nature has;)

From: Pat Lefemine
29-Jul-18
Interesting. Never heard of super urea. I just top dressed my corn and milo with straight urea but I timed it just before major rains. First drop hit the ground as I was driving my tractor off the field!

From: t-roy
29-Jul-18

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Here’s a snapshot of, what seems to be an annual event on this plot anymore, with all of the field tile that has been put in the agricultural fields anymore. It ends up in the river very quickly now. This is just as the river started to flood. It got about 10’ higher than this, and stayed flooded for over a month.

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