QuietKat all-terrain e-bikes
Clover for a New B
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
APauls 31-Jul-18
grubby 31-Jul-18
DDT 31-Jul-18
Mike-TN 31-Jul-18
dm/wolfskin 31-Jul-18
Mike-TN 31-Jul-18
rodb 31-Jul-18
APauls 02-Aug-18
nutritionist 14-Aug-18
Deerplotter 14-Aug-18
Medicinemann 14-Aug-18
happygolucky 15-Aug-18
flyingbrass 18-Aug-18
APauls 18-Aug-18
From: APauls
31-Jul-18
So I’m completely fresh to this, not a farmer, pretend I know nothing. Hoping for some helpful hints. Looking to plant some clover in a couple half to 1.5 acre areas. Right now these areas are like field but just wild grasses, some clover etc. Is it a good idea to try and plant this year yet, or just plan for next year? If planning for next year what should I do this year? I have time on Wednesday to start some things. I’m thinking step 1 is kill off what’s there. My initial plan was frost seeding as I am light on equipment. I own a hand seeded (good one) backpack sprayer, already own gly is about my only usable chemical.

I was also debating putting the 1.5 into alfalfa as it seems it’s also possible to frost seed that.

Any thoughts? Thanks so much guys

31-Jul-18
I like clover plantings in the Fall better. Less weed competition, and clover starts off slow. By next Spring it will be doing a lot better.

If i had only limited equipment, I would spray gly in the Fall when plants will take more into their roots and you usually will get a better kill. Then frost seed as you said.

Soil sample first.

I am sure some experts will give better advice soon. Good luck!

From: grubby
31-Jul-18
I would sure hate to go back to the old days before I owned my tractor. I think you are on the right track planting clover. If there is some clover now I might be inclined to just mow and frost seed and see where you are at next june. Otherwise I would figure out a way to bust it up and plant some sort of clover blend. Last year I worked up a pipeline row that was just grass, planted GRO inner sanctum and had a nice plot by fall. this spring I frost seeded clover and It is looking pretty good. I don't know what kind of business you are in but if it needed land it also needs a tractor!

From: DDT
31-Jul-18
Soil test right away. Add some pelletized lime as it's easier to spread. Fertilizer as recommended then I would mow it and overseed with some ground hog radishes now. Let them loosen up the soil and as a bonus feed the deer, then frost seed the clover come spring. I've been successful overseeding radishes they catch and the clippings from mowing act as mulch. Gotta start somewhere. Watch it, food plotting is addictive.

From: Mike-TN
31-Jul-18
This is a tough one. If that is all the equipment I had I would use the gly to kill off the field now. After a couple weeks see what is coming back or was missed and spray again. I would get 10 lbs of ladino clover and about 75 lbs of wheat per acre and put down in September just before a rain. I would run my ATV over the whole thing several times to get the seed in contact with soil. Frost seed in March if you have some bare spots

From: dm/wolfskin
31-Jul-18
Better get your PH above 6 to 7. You can mix cover and alfalfa together. Both seeds are small and you only need to barely cover it with soil.

From: Mike-TN
31-Jul-18
Don’t frost seed alfalfa.... clover is way easier to start with vs alfalfa. Alfalfa is too finicky for most food plotters

From: rodb
31-Jul-18
Kill it now, in a two weeks disc and then harrow. Plant Ladino clover and at the end of August plant rye seed. The clover will get a head start for next spring and the rye will get plenty of attention this fall.

From: APauls
02-Aug-18
Thanks guys!

From: nutritionist
14-Aug-18
Clovers and perennials work best as scrapelines and you should always think of a 3 year rotation and with strips. You help set your property up for 365 day nutrition and long term sustainability. I want 1/3 of a property into clovers, 1/3 into corn,soybeans and flex acres and the last third into fall brassica blends, cold tolerant annuals or winter bulbs.

Large blocks of perennials are harder to hunt unless u break the field down. There is strategy based on how a field lays and stand locations.

From: Deerplotter
14-Aug-18
I have had good success with Sept plantings of clover. Get it started this fall and next spring it will really take off. Use a good quality clover seed. I have tried many and sell Seed as well but have to admit the Whitetail Institute Imperial Clover is tough to beat. Big leaves and hardy. Obviously the soil prep ph, etc all matter too. Frost Seed it and press it in with ATV tires for seed to soil contact and you are good to go Good luck

From: Medicinemann
14-Aug-18
Just understand that "foodplotting" can become addictive.....no joke!!

From: happygolucky
15-Aug-18
I'd get a soil sample and try to amend the PH this fall. I'd spray it with Gly/AMS this fall. I'm in the camp that planting clover in the fall is a better way to get things started. I would also add Winter Rye now too as it gives them food this year and will serve as a good nurse crop for the clover next spring. It will be good for the soil as well. Depending on the soil sample, you could amend with the fertilizer recommendation this fall.

From: flyingbrass
18-Aug-18

flyingbrass's embedded Photo
flyingbrass's embedded Photo
here is my spring clover planting, its thick with no weeds! 6 acres!

From: APauls
18-Aug-18
Wowzers! I sprayed it once about a week ago. Unfortunately prob won’t be able to make it back for another 3 weeks.

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