Sitka Mountain Gear
Canning bear meat
Bears
Contributors to this thread:
Wv hillbilly 01-Aug-18
EliteFan 01-Aug-18
Shug 01-Aug-18
Fuzzy 02-Aug-18
Franklin 02-Aug-18
Wv hillbilly 02-Aug-18
Fuzzy 03-Aug-18
Fuzzy 03-Aug-18
Steve H. 03-Aug-18
Wv hillbilly 03-Aug-18
Aubs8 03-Aug-18
Fuzzy 06-Aug-18
jmiller 06-Aug-18
grape 06-Aug-18
01-Aug-18
Anyone can much bear meat? I like to can deer meat and the kids love it. Was thinking about trying bear meat this year. Is anything different in the set up? Longer cook time, don't put as much meat in the jar due to extra fat?

Thanks for the advice.

From: EliteFan
01-Aug-18
I do. I can mine for 90 mins at 12-15 psi. I usually add a little beef bullion, garlic, a teaspoon of canning salt, sometimes jalapeno and a bit of onion. I really like it and use it in stroganoff type dishes.

From: Shug
01-Aug-18
I don’t like it in the can

From: Fuzzy
02-Aug-18
raw pack it and process the same as venison, etc. 10 PSI for 90 minutes quarts, 75 minutes pints. add salt if you like. Be sure to leave the 1" headspace, like pork the fat can compromise the seal if you overfill the jar

From: Franklin
02-Aug-18
You can "can" your old hunting boots with the right spices and it will still taste good. If you are versed at canning meat you should be good to go. Canning meat can be tricky and even dangerous if not done properly.

02-Aug-18
Thanks for the advice!

From: Fuzzy
03-Aug-18
Franklin, you are quite right. If anyone is interested, I've posted several times instructions for safe proper canning of game meats, the search function should bring those threads up

From: Fuzzy
03-Aug-18
I'm sorry, I just realized there is not a search feature on this part of the site. Here are my instructions. If you'd like them emailed in a more readable form PM me or email me at cecil.sink@vdh.virginia.gov Canning venison preserves it, without refrigeration, it preserves it for years without freezer burn, it preserves it, in a pre-cooked state, so that preparation takes only a few seconds or minutes, preserves it in a state that is safe and easy to transport, and takes up very little space..... canning tenderizes tougher cuts, and seals in all the natural juices, canning tends to eliminate strong flavor from game meats..... spices can be added, and tend to be more flavorful than if added during regular cooking; what you do with it is up to your own tastes, canned sausage is good in meat sauces, on pizza, in casseroles, in gravy, and chili, same with canned burger; canned chunk meat is good as-is, or in stew, chili, hash, barbecue, pot pie, sandwiches, and many other things, canned steaks/cutlets can be breaded and fried, or eaten as-is, or on sandwiches....... Canning Deer and other meats : Do not use open-kettle canning method for meat. Use a modern, good quality pressure cooker, designed for canning, and capable of reaching and holding the pressures listed. The method I use is my own and works for me. I make no representation as to it’s safety or suitability beyond the fact that it does work well for me. I assume no responsibility or liability for accident, illness, or injury resulting from use or misuse of these instructions. Rules: Always use clean boiled CANNING JARS (no mayonnaise, pickle or mustard jars.) Always use new, lids, designed for the jars you are using. Always be sure your meat is clean, fresh, and safe. Always use a pressure canner for canning meat. Always process jars at least as long as the times given, at or above the pressures listed. Never process meat using these instructions at over 4,000 feet above sea level. **( for revised instructions for over 4,000 feet below) Never use any canned product if seal is broken, lid is bulged, lid is rusted, or if there is any doubt as to it’s safety. Never cut corners. Never place frozen meat in jars. Meat can be cold (icecrystals in meat) but not frozen; jars will crack. Never use damaged or chipped jars. Raw Pack: Deer meat chunks: place in wide-mouth quart jars, force air out with wooden spoon, and fill to within 1 and 1½"of top of jar (just below shoulder) pour in 1teaspoon salt, if desired, clean rim, place lid, gently tighten rim. Deer spareribs: leave all meat on ribs, chop into 2-3" squares, place in jars same as meat chunks, except, top with 1 tablespoon sausage Seasoning. Clean rim. Place lid on jar. Deer Sausage: season and grind sausage to taste, roll into 2" balls, dop in jars, press in with wooden spoon to force out air, fill to within 1 and ½" of rim. Clean rim. Place lid on jar. Deer burger: same as above. Deer-n-pig: my favorite! Cut deer tenderloin (back-strap) and fresh pork tenderloin or lean fresh pork butt, into 2" cubes, place in jars as above, add 1 teaspoon salt, ½ teaspoon rubbed sage, Clean rim, place lid on jar. Do not add any liquid to raw-pack…. When a canner load of jars is full place in canner, with hot (not boiling) water. Boiling water will crack jars when cold. Increase heat until canner is at a rolling boil, then place lid, and set pressure. Use 10 psi up to 2,000 feet, 15 psi 2,000 to 4,000 feet. When canner reaches set pressure, start timing, hold at or above pressure for 90 minutes, or more. Longer times or higher pressure will cause sparerib bones to become cooked and "chalky". Dressed, Scaled Fish , or fish fillets: same as Deer meat chunks. Dove Breast; same as deer meat chunks. Hot pack: Squirrel, rabbit, or chicken: Smoke whole dressed squirrels until done, cut into pieces and remove ribs, place in jars as tightly as possible, with 1 and ½" headspace, and cover with boiling beef bullion, clean rim, place lids on jars. Meat Stew: fill jars with stew to within 1 and ½" of rim, clean rim, place lids on jars. Deer meat chunks: cook meat in salted water until fork-tender, place in jars, within 1 and ½" of rim, cover with broth, clean rims, place lids on jars. Sausage patties: Fry sausage patties, until done thru, drain grease, place in jars witrhin 1 and 1/2" of rim, cover with beef bullion, clean rims and place lids on jars. Place hot-pack jars in boiling water in canner, and return to a boil, place lid on canner, and process (quarts) at least 90 minutes at 10 psi at up to 2,000 feet; 15 psi 2,000 to 4,000 feet *** (0ver 4,000 feet, up to 6,500 feet process 110 minutes at 15 PSI)

From: Steve H.
03-Aug-18
I canned a lot of muskox when I killed a big old bull in 2009. Still have one jar left--ten years no problem! Days of plenty help smooth out times of famine. Tough meat becomes tender as a fawn.

03-Aug-18
Great info! Thanks fuzzy

From: Aubs8
03-Aug-18
Thanks again, Fuzzy!

From: Fuzzy
06-Aug-18
Steve H I remember when you did the musk ox hunt, wow! Still have some left?

From: jmiller
06-Aug-18
I can at least a deer every year, as well as geese if the hunting is good.

From: grape
06-Aug-18
If you have canned venison and enjoyed it, you will enjoy bear canned . I’ve been doing it for years. It’s awesome. Follow the venison guidelines.

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