Sitka Mountain Gear
Need help identifying this weed
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Pat Lefemine 07-Aug-18
jingalls 07-Aug-18
TrapperKayak 07-Aug-18
BOHUNTER09 07-Aug-18
Pat Lefemine 07-Aug-18
Beendare 07-Aug-18
TrapperKayak 07-Aug-18
Pat Lefemine 07-Aug-18
BOHUNTER09 07-Aug-18
BOHUNTER09 07-Aug-18
pointingdogs 07-Aug-18
APauls 07-Aug-18
dm/wolfskin 07-Aug-18
From: Pat Lefemine
07-Aug-18

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Appears to be some sort of invasive grass but I've not been able to positively identify it. Thanks.

From: jingalls
07-Aug-18
Greenis Sprigitus: Latin for weed. Easily killed by the cancer causing agent...round up!

From: TrapperKayak
07-Aug-18
Crabgrass.

From: BOHUNTER09
07-Aug-18
I think it’s fall pannicum. It’s common Illinois. Comes up later in my corn. Control with glyphosate if you have RR crops

From: Pat Lefemine
07-Aug-18
Bingo. Thanks Carl. I knew it wasn't crab grass. I can control it with RU but many of my plots are not RR and I'm having difficulty controlling it. It's extremely invasive.

From: Beendare
07-Aug-18
The problem with that stuff is the thousands of seeds in that head.

You can target kill with a monocot killer [monocotyledonous]

I dunno what you have in your area but something Like Fusilade, Poast, Poast plus or Vantage only targets grassy weeds and won't harm broadleaf.

From: TrapperKayak
07-Aug-18

TrapperKayak's embedded Photo
TrapperKayak's embedded Photo
Its close, but grows up instead of out...

From: Pat Lefemine
07-Aug-18
Mystery solved. Panicum is not controlled by Imox / Raptor. That’s why It’s popping up. Also not controlled post emergence with Atrazine.

From: BOHUNTER09
07-Aug-18
I’ve used Me 2 Lachor as a preplant and at about 4 week s post emerge on beans and corn. That holds it back until hopefully there is enough shading to overcome it. I have also used Armezon post emerge in corn. Pat is right regarding this aggressive weed.

From: BOHUNTER09
07-Aug-18
To clarify, Me2 Lachlor will not kill emerged weeds. It prevents germination of small seeds so can’t be used with clovers , turnips etc.

From: pointingdogs
07-Aug-18
Grows in my Iowa garden :(

From: APauls
07-Aug-18
Can’t tell exactly from the pic but looks almost identical to what we call foxtail up here

From: dm/wolfskin
07-Aug-18
HomePest MonitoringIPCM NewsletterMEG NewsletterMPG BulletinPublications Integrated Pest & Crop Management

IPCM articles AUTHOR Doug Spaunhorst University of Missouri Division of Plant Sciences Kevin Bradley University of Missouri Division of Plant Sciences (573) 882-4039 bradleyke@missouri.edu Weed of the Month: Fall Panicum PUBLISHED: SEPTEMBER 1, 2011 Fall panicum (Panicum dichotomiflorum Michx.) is a summer annual grass weed found throughout the United States in a variety of agronomic, non-crop, nursery, landscape, and turfgrass settings. Over the past several years, fall panicum has become an increasingly problematic weed of corn and soybean production in Missouri.

Figure 1. Fall panicum seedlings have hairs on the leaf undersides only, but these disappear with maturity. Fall panicum seedlings can appear much different than mature plants. Perhaps the most notable characteristic of fall panicum seedlings are the hairs that occur on the lower leaf surfaces (Figure 1). Seedlings also have hair-like ligules that typically measure 2 mm or less in length and are without auricles. Mature plants have leaves that are quite large at maturity, measuring 15-20 mm in width, are rolled in the bud, and are hairless on both surfaces. Leaves also have a distinct white midvein and are often glossy in appearance (Figures 2 and 3). With maturity, plants take on a "zigzagged" growth habit. Stems are relatively thick, hairless, and usually enlarged at the nodes. Fall panicum seedheads are wide, spreading panicles that develop a purplish tint when mature.

Fall panicum seed emergence occurs most readily at depths of 0 to 2 inches, with few seeds capable of germinating from soil depths greater than this. Other authors have observed extreme variability in the pattern of fall panicum emergence from one year to the next. However, most indications are that this species tends to be a later emerging weed that can germinate throughout the growing season.

Figure 2. As fall panicum plants mature, a white midvein becomes noticeable as well as glossy leaf undersides. In corn, atrazine usually will only provide fair pre-emergence, residual control of fall panicum, which may explain the higher incidence of this weed in our corn and soybean production systems over the past several years. Atrazine premixes that contain metolachlor (Bicep II Magnum, Charger Max, Lumax, Lexar, etc.), acetochlor (Degree Xtra, Harness Xtra, etc.), or dimethenamid (Guardsman Max) will increase control of fall panicum dramatically. Post-emergence control of fall panicum in corn is difficult and must be timely; applications must be made to small fall panicum plants in order to be effective. However, products that contain ALS-inhibiting herbicides like nicosulfuron (Accent), rimsulfuron (Resolve, Basis), thiencarbazone (Capreno) can provide good control of fall panicum as well as glyphosate (Roundup, etc.) and glufosinate (Ignite), in Roundup Ready and LibertyLink corn systems, respectively. Post-emergence applications of the HPPD-inhibiting herbicides Callisto, Impact, and Laudis generally only provide fair to poor control of fall panicum.

Figure 3. Mature fall panicum plants with seedheads. Many of the pre-emergence, residual herbicides that are relied upon for the control of fall panicum in corn can be utilized in soybean as well. For example, pre-emergence applications of products that contain metolachlor (Dual II Magnum, Prefix, Boundary), alachlor (IntRRo), dimethenamid (Outlook, Verdict), and pendimethalin (Prowl, Prowl H2O) will provide good control of fall panicum in soybean. Post-emergence options for the control of fall panicum in soybeans include the grass herbicides like quizalofop (Assure II, Targa, etc.), fluazifop (Fusilade), and clethodim (Select Max, Arrow, etc.), glyphosate (Roundup, Touchdown, etc.) in Roundup Ready soybeans, and glufosinate (Ignite) in LibertyLink soybeans.

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