Ripcord Arrow Rests
Need new tent stove
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Kodiak 19-Aug-18
cnelk 19-Aug-18
Bill Obeid 19-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 19-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 19-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 19-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 19-Aug-18
Ambush 19-Aug-18
Kodiak 19-Aug-18
Heat 19-Aug-18
WV Mountaineer 19-Aug-18
LKH 20-Aug-18
Kodiak 20-Aug-18
Kodiak 20-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 20-Aug-18
Kodiak 20-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 20-Aug-18
huntabsarokee 20-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 20-Aug-18
WV Mountaineer 20-Aug-18
huntabsarokee 20-Aug-18
uteangler 21-Aug-18
Mule Power 22-Aug-18
PECO 22-Aug-18
cubdrvr 22-Aug-18
Kodiak 29-Aug-18
Kodiak 29-Aug-18
flyingbrass 29-Aug-18
jfish 29-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 29-Aug-18
Kodiak 30-Aug-18
huntabsarokee 30-Aug-18
Kodiak 30-Aug-18
Dirk Diggler 30-Aug-18
Kodiak 30-Aug-18
huntabsarokee 30-Aug-18
Kodiak 30-Aug-18
Keith in colorado 30-Aug-18
trackman 30-Aug-18
Mindrasect 02-Jan-19
Mule Power 02-Jan-19
Cbfromnd 02-Jan-19
bad karma 02-Jan-19
Kodiak 02-Jan-19
stykshooter 06-Jan-19
GF 07-Jan-19
From: Kodiak
19-Aug-18
Need a stove that'll retain some heat most of the night in a 14x17 wall tent.

Any recommendations?

From: cnelk
19-Aug-18

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
I made my own. 12”x12”x18” from 14ga metal.

Last year in Wyoming I had fire going in it for 5 days straight. I tried something new and that was stoke it with a couple ‘DuraFlame’ logs along with firewood for the night.

It would last 6-7 hours and have coals in the morning.

When I left to go hunting I’d stoke it with more firewood and after the morning hunt, 3-4 hrs later there was still embers.

From: Bill Obeid
19-Aug-18
I just sleep arms distance from the stove door. Throw a stick in when I get cold.

If you have the means , you could try dampening the fire with a few small shovels of coal.

From: Dirk Diggler
19-Aug-18
Bring a couple old guys with ya and feed em a few beers before bed. Trust me, it works!

From: Dirk Diggler
19-Aug-18
I've got the bigger cylinder stove. I load it plumb full and damp it down a bit before turnin in. Then, said old guys do occassionally throw a few logs in at 2am or so.

From: Dirk Diggler
19-Aug-18

Dirk Diggler's embedded Photo
Dirk Diggler's embedded Photo
Or you could get creative like a horse shoein buddy of mine. He built this one out of a 30lb propane bottle and a bunch of used rasps.

From: Dirk Diggler
19-Aug-18

Dirk Diggler's embedded Photo
Dirk Diggler's embedded Photo

From: Ambush
19-Aug-18

Ambush's embedded Photo
Ambush's embedded Photo
I build them out of propane bottles. One thirty and one twenty pounder gets you almost every thing you.

From: Kodiak
19-Aug-18
Yeah I can't make one, I ain't got the skills.

Any of those Camp Chef stoves any good? Right now I'm running the cheap Cabelas basic model but it just doesn't cut it.

A big Cylinder would be nice but I'm not sure I want to lay out $500 for one.

From: Heat
19-Aug-18
I have a 3 Dog by 4 Dog Stoves I'm happy with but it looks like they are only making titanium stoves at the moment. Their's is baffled which makes a lot of sense to me compared to one without a baffle.

19-Aug-18
I use a warm morning coal stove. Glad I have access to coal. Keeps fire all night. Long night too. Not 6 hours. 10-12 hours. If you have access to it, buy a coal stove and use it. You'll love it. Coal stoves have fire brick and are air fed from below the fire. Not through the door level with the fire. It makes a huge difference. If you can't find a coal and a coal stove, get a wood burner with a large firebox. A coal stove doesn't need to be nearly as big. Good luck and God bless

From: LKH
20-Aug-18
I just gave away the medium priced one offered by Canvas Cabins. Used it when nights got down to minus 18 (-18F) in central Idaho during a December archery hunt. Stuffed it full, closed it down and only had to refill once.

A trick to better burn and heat retention is to put about 3/4" sand or small gravel in the bottom of the stove. That hot rock really gets the wood to burn completely.

You're from Minnesnotah and deal with high humidity. For winter hunts, keep a couple banana boxes of wood in your furnace room. The definition of dry firewood.

From: Kodiak
20-Aug-18
I only use it out west. With the stove I have now I only get 3 hours of heat from it.

The camp chef looks good for the money, $200 on Amazon. I'm sure it's Chinese but I couldn't care less.

From: Kodiak
20-Aug-18

Kodiak  's embedded Photo
Kodiak  's embedded Photo
Camp Chef

From: Dirk Diggler
20-Aug-18
Kodiak duration has a lot to do with the wood yer burnin as I'm sure you know. I'm usually wishin for some of that good old Minnesota red oak while I'm in the hills of Colorado. If a guy had a couple pieces of that to throw on before turnin in it'd go a lot farther than our pine and Aspen. Guys that used to camp next to me from Wisconsin would haul a few armloads out every season. Probably against the law these days

From: Kodiak
20-Aug-18
Anybody ever use charcoal?...or is that a big no-no.

Not sure about the CO effect from charcoal.

From: Dirk Diggler
20-Aug-18
I tried coal once. Maybe I had some bad coal, or damped it to low, never did burn very well. Sooted up my pipe pretty good, stunck a bit.

20-Aug-18
With the stage 1 fire restrictions in place in CO can you use a stove like this?

I also looked at the Camp Chef on Amazon and it seems like the best deal for $200. Its $250 at Cabelas. At the last minute a buddy is loaning me his stove. Its on the small side though but for the price I will give it a try.

From: Dirk Diggler
20-Aug-18
Yes these are allowed. Open fires are what usually get nixed.

20-Aug-18
Coal won’t burn anywhere near right unless you are burning a COAL stove.

20-Aug-18
Yeah I burn anthracite in a whole house water boiler and doubt you will get coal to burn in a wood stove at least not hard coal. It need lots of air coming from under the coal. I did think about trying wood pellets in a wood stove. I did see some place for sale a square cage you load up with pellets and then you place that inside the wood stove.

From: uteangler
21-Aug-18
I have a 3 dog stove made by 4 dog stoves. I love it. Close it way down at night, and gave me about 6 to 7 hours of nice heat. Usually 1 of us is up somewhere between 1 and 3 so we throw a couple logs in.

From: Mule Power
22-Aug-18
Camp Chef is a good one. Cylinder Stove company is the old go to. The Outfitter model will serve your purpose. The Hunter is too small. The Yukon is big but if you drive right to your camp and really don’t want to get up at all during the night that’s the one.

From: PECO
22-Aug-18
"Bring a couple old guys with ya and feed em a few beers before bed." Sounds like the best option so far LOL.

From: cubdrvr
22-Aug-18
Wouldn’t work with this old fart, I’ve learned how to use a pee bottle LOL.

From: Kodiak
29-Aug-18

Kodiak  's embedded Photo
Kodiak  's embedded Photo
Went with the Camp Chef. It's a great stove, highly recommend it. Doing the initial burn right now in the yard.

I'm loving it.

From: Kodiak
29-Aug-18
Btw cabelas matched the internet price so I got it for $200 instead of $250. Can't complain about that.

From: flyingbrass
29-Aug-18
http://fourdog.com I would like to see some bowsite reviews on this one.

From: jfish
29-Aug-18
Like mentioned the type of wood used is important. We use a military wood stove modified to reduce all air leaks with door gasket and sealed top. We’re lucky here on the east coast with Red Oaks. Even then with quality wood packed tightened choked down we get 6 hours. Coals remaining but not much heat. Throw in two good chunks and it time to get up about the time the tent is warmed up.

From: Dirk Diggler
29-Aug-18
Kodiak, is it the same size of the bigger cylinder stove? What does it weigh? TIA

From: Kodiak
30-Aug-18
I'm not sure to be honest. It's heavy steel, comes with nesting stove pipe, fire grate, dampener, two side shelves, adjustable legs, spark arrestor. Everything fits neatly inside for transport.

Amazon.com : Camp Chef Alpine CS14 Heavy Duty Cylinder Tent Cabin Stove with damper ... Product Dimensions: 24 x 20 x 22.5 inches ; 74 pounds; Shipping Weight: 74.2 pounds

It's more heavy duty than I thought it'd be. Very happy with it so far, we'll see how it does in Colorado. We're leaving on the 12th I think.

Like I said, I think it's a good piece of gear for only $200. I'll give a review when I get back.

30-Aug-18
Kodiak I see Cabelas has that stove on their website now for $200 as well. Thinking about picking one up. Would it be possible for you to measure just the stove pipe length or from ground to top of stove pipe when assembled. Website says stove pipe is 10' which would be perfect for my tent but hoping that doesn't mean 10' to top of stove pipe from ground. My tent peak is almost 10' so hoping it would be closer to 12' total.

From: Kodiak
30-Aug-18
Sure, I'll measure it right now.

From: Dirk Diggler
30-Aug-18
I think the only thing different than the cylinder stove package is the side mounted water tank, which I never use, and the cylinder stove warming rack is a solid piece of steel. Lookin forward to your review. At that price I could always use another!

From: Kodiak
30-Aug-18
It's 129" from the ground to the top of the stove pipe. There's five 2' sections of stove pipe but you lose some height when they slide together.

30-Aug-18
That should work. Thank you!

From: Kodiak
30-Aug-18

Kodiak  's embedded Photo
Kodiak  's embedded Photo
You could always add another 2' section if you wanted to.

It'll probably work fine as is.

30-Aug-18
Cabelas has the Camp chef stove on sale for 199

From: trackman
30-Aug-18
If you are coming to south Colorado i will give you one.

From: Mindrasect
02-Jan-19

Mindrasect's Link
My friend has a 12x14 Davis and their medium size stove. That thing will run you out of the tent if you run it wide open, despite when it's down amid the 30's. It shows signs of improvement than normal expend times, around 4/5 hrs. I'd propose their little size stove for your tent.

From: Mule Power
02-Jan-19
If it runs you out of the tent you aren’t using it properly and it won’t last all night.

Come back to camp.... only fill it half way with smaller logs and give it lots of air. Eat your dinner and talk about the day and plans for tomorrow. By the time you’re ready for bed that smal stuff will have burnt down to a nice bed of hot coals. Stuff it with bigger logs and give it air for 5 minutes then shut the damer down and close the lower air vent to less than 1/8 inch opening and it’ll simmer nicely through the night. If you wake up to gonto the bathroom restuff it and you’ll really be set to wake up to a warm tent.

From: Cbfromnd
02-Jan-19
Flyingbrass.... we have the 3 dog version from FourDog Stove company... We have been more than happy... Early season we have the 12x20 alaknak and we stay more than warm.... later in the season ( late November in ND ) we use our 12x12 Alaknak and it does a great job... I think the four dog version would be what's needed if we ran the 12x20 the whole season...

From: bad karma
02-Jan-19
During a stage 1 fire restriction, stoves of this type would not be allowed. Relying on legal advice from a discussion thread is unwise. https://gacc.nifc.gov/rmcc/dispatch_centers/r2ftc/documents/Fire_Restriction_Chart.pdf

From: Kodiak
02-Jan-19
I started this thread. It was so hot and dry in Colorado last fall we never even used it.

From: stykshooter
06-Jan-19
I have a 14 X 16 Davis wall tent and heat it with a three dog stove. Probably going on 100 nights in the tent now over the past several years. It has been an outstanding addition. I started out with a cylinder stove but it wouldn't keep a fire long enough, especially when out west burning soft wood. I agree with the above comments, I think the baffles make a big difference.

From: GF
07-Jan-19
I built mine from a .50 Cal ammo can. Took it to a muffler shop and had a guy weld in a collar that fit the stovepipe.

Screwed on legs made from steel like you’d use to reinforce a corner or build a shelving unit.

Cut in the door with a hacksaw and drilled a half-dozen holes below the door. Plugged ‘em with wads of tin-foil as a damper. Smoked like a mother due to a too-small chimney, but a length of fiberglass rope gasket under the lid fixed that just fine. Just need a grate in the bottom to get air under the fuel. I had read about something similar in Sea Kayaker magazine and they recommended a layer of gravel to prevent hot-spots burning through, so I always went that way. Gravel and a few liters of water were great for scrubbing out the inside of the box so I could use it up pack up lanterns, kerosene, white gas, etc.

Next time around....

4” pipe, rather than 3”; put the collar on the back to free up more top surface for cooking area.

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