Tight Spot Quivers
Bowhunting with a canoe
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Tonybear61 09-Sep-18
South Farm 10-Sep-18
Kodiak 10-Sep-18
Bill Obeid 10-Sep-18
wilbur 10-Sep-18
APauls 10-Sep-18
Tonybear61 10-Sep-18
NoWiser 11-Sep-18
South Farm 11-Sep-18
ground hunter 11-Sep-18
Russ Koon 11-Sep-18
GF 11-Sep-18
Basinboy 11-Sep-18
drycreek 11-Sep-18
Russell 11-Sep-18
dirtclod Az. 11-Sep-18
Russell 11-Sep-18
From: Tonybear61
09-Sep-18
HI all,

Wonder how many folks have bowhunted successfully out of or use canoe, kayak or similar watercraft to access hunting areas?

After 10 years taking it up again this year. Built a big balloon wheel cart to bring a canoe down to the points difficult to access (swamps, cattails, bridge crossing etc., with no official landings).

Scouted a few islands today, marked trails trees for stands and possible ground blinds. Afterwards fished the small stream and caught pike, lost some lures. Good sign everywhere as you can expect anyplace there is acorns.

So any stories, tips to to share?? I am currently using a big old 17 ft aluminum Grumman.

From: South Farm
10-Sep-18
Lived on the edge of the BWCA so I've spent A LOT of time in a canoe, and hauled my fair share of dead critters in one. They're great for silently slipping into and out of your hunting spot. If you can find a royalex (Old Town Camper) for cheap pick it up...best hunting canoe ever! Silent, indestructible, and not too heavy.

From: Kodiak
10-Sep-18

Kodiak  's embedded Photo
Kodiak  's embedded Photo

From: Bill Obeid
10-Sep-18

Bill Obeid's embedded Photo
Upper marsh fork, Canning River
Bill Obeid's embedded Photo
Upper marsh fork, Canning River
North Slope of the Brooks Range....along the Upper Marsh Fork of the Canning River.

From: wilbur
10-Sep-18
Love it, use my canoe frequently to access spots.

From: APauls
10-Sep-18
Yes, I would just suggest staying away from an aluminum canoe. Much too noisy.

From: Tonybear61
10-Sep-18
Carpet helps on the noise, don't currently have cash for a Kevlar canoe.

From: NoWiser
11-Sep-18
I haven't bow hunted from a canoe but have done plenty of gun hunting with a canoe. I also think that you cannot beat royalex. It is not the same as Kevlar and can be had fairly cheap if you watch for deals. I have bought an old beat up We-no-nah and love it.

From: South Farm
11-Sep-18
I used an aluminum for years and beat the heck out of it hauling dead bears and such. When I moved "up" to my Old Town Camper they were only $600 new, now they are twice that if you find one! Kevlar would be my last choice in a hunting rig, although for tripping or fishing trips they are definitely the cats meow.

11-Sep-18
I am in the UP, so use mine quite a bit...... my favorite is a 10 footer, light and easy to handle and can get down, and back up, very small creek areas

I have 2 kayaks, do not like them for hunting, except for ducks at times..........

My other canoe is a raddison out of Canada,,,13 foot square stern, wide in the middle, even has oar locks....... I can stand in it, nicely if needed, and packs well.... if I have some lake work needed, I have a 2hp internal, to use, on windy days,,,,,,

anything over 50lbs to me is useless, to hard to handle, but mine get pulled in and out all of the time,,,,, I do not have drive in lots I am going on, so weight is my concern.....

sometimes, in the fall, I take off with the 13 footer for several days, my wife will pick me up. I just enjoy the paddling, loafing, etc....... so many good water crossings I find, I set up usually on the ground, right off the water...... very few, hardly no one, unless private property, and even then seldom, does anyone hunt, by or in the water.........

I like this type of hunting, but hey, have have a lot of water to explore when I want

From: Russ Koon
11-Sep-18
My Old Reliable Coleman 17 was my third canoe, after an extremely light solid foam 12' one and a heavy, livery survivor 16' aluminum that weighed 96#. The Coleman is a formed plastic that seems to be pretty much indestructible. It has laid out in the weather for a couple of generations now, survived being bent into a horseshoe shape around a neighbors big maple by a windstorm, and numerous rough landings on river trips. Looks somewhat battle-scarred, but still has NO leaks. Not a canoe to win any beauty contests or any distance paddling races, but they were and still are as rugged as they come.

They are apparently no longer being made, but I still see one laying in a backyard or on a rack out next to a garage fairly often.

A couple of my favorite pics are the ones with my younger brother in the bow seat and a deer atop our tent and packs and ML's as we paddled out to my Jeep a mile or so down a slow little creek to our launch spot.

The wife's favorite moment to recall and retell was when we were loading back up at the end of a fun overnight camp with our son. He was about fifteen at the time, and we had been canoeing a few times and were, of course, pretty much "experts" with all that experience. So when we had emptied the canoe of all the stuff that needed to go inside the vehicle and walked back to the landing to swing the canoe smoothly up and over our heads for the carry up the slight slope to the truck, she was watching her guys and admiring the smooth expertise we had developed. Until we swung the canoe up settled it down over our heads with each of us facing in opposite directions! We had always had the canoe on a slope before with the uphill lead end being obvious by its position, so had never needed to agree beforehand on which end was to be the lead, and we had both assumed it to be our end. And of course neither of us could see the other to see our error until we both tried to step towards the truck. That 3-stooges moment was too much for her, and she couldn't even retell it for couple years without stopping to catch her breath from laughing.

One caveat about using one for gun hunting. The recoil of two twelve gauge shotguns firing a simultaneous broadside at a rising duck, is enough to put a 17' canoe with a couple of 180# hunters completely upside down about as fast as a mousetrap closes.

From: GF
11-Sep-18
A Grumman 17 is a real workhorse, isn’t it? We have the “lightweight” model lying under a big Spruce in my mom’s back yard.

That one will do what you need!

11-Sep-18
always wanted to.....I'll be catching some smallmouth and drinking beerout of a 16' 5" old town this weekend.

From: Basinboy
11-Sep-18

Basinboy's embedded Photo
Basinboy's embedded Photo
Here in Louisiana Cajuns use wooden boats called Pirogues The paddle easily and are quiet I took this buck last season by getting to a place others without a boat couldn’t get to

Corey

From: drycreek
11-Sep-18
I used to do a lot of duck and squirrel hunting out of a flat bottomed boat. We could get way down the river to places that you'd have to walk two or three miles to without the boat. Drifted some and used a trolling motor some, but when we were through hunting, fire up the outboard and go back to the truck. Finally graduated to deer hunting after there were enough to hunt. I can't imagine a canoe not being useful in the right places.

From: Russell
11-Sep-18
Here's my one-man canoe I use occasionally. Very light.

From: dirtclod Az.
11-Sep-18
Went from flat bottom to a V-hull.Big difference,same weight.

From: Russell
11-Sep-18

Russell's embedded Photo
Russell's embedded Photo

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