QuietKat all-terrain e-bikes
Hunting a deep valley
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
pointingdogs 26-Oct-18
JohnMC 26-Oct-18
midwest 26-Oct-18
Brotsky 26-Oct-18
Bake 26-Oct-18
Franzen 26-Oct-18
Bowriter 26-Oct-18
pointingdogs 26-Oct-18
DMTJAGER 26-Oct-18
sitO 26-Oct-18
Highcountrystykbow 27-Oct-18
Bowriter 27-Oct-18
Hawkeye 27-Oct-18
Outside 27-Oct-18
From: pointingdogs
26-Oct-18
This my have been discussed before. I have not had any luck placing a stand in a deep valley in the past. I just got a farm with a deep valley. 100 yards wide.... very steep on both sides. It goes northeast to southwest. We do get southwest winds here in Iowa in late fall. There are scrapes on either sides of the valley (up top) that I will hunt at this time. I have not ventured into the bottom as I kicked out some bedded deer. Any thoughts on hunting the bottom of the valley (too many swirling winds? Just don't do it :) ) Thanks

From: JohnMC
26-Oct-18
You better have a good game cart or a plan to get the a deer out of deep valley.

From: midwest
26-Oct-18
I've never had good luck hunting the bottom of those types of valleys. Wind is too fickle. I'd much rather be up the side where a perpendicular deep cut creates a funnel.

From: Brotsky
26-Oct-18
Don't do it! Hunt the tops and if the terrain allows any benches you might find on the slopes are pure gold.

From: Bake
26-Oct-18
I'm with you fellers. Can't do it. Wind will kill you every time

From: Franzen
26-Oct-18
100 yds is very questionable when talking about being steep on both sides. Get around a quarter mile wide or so and let's talk.

From: Bowriter
26-Oct-18
Basic rule of thumb is this: Hunt high in the mornings and low in the afternoon. Understand that deer, just as you and I, tend to take the path of least resistance when going up and down. Look for sloping points, especially ones with finger ridges and place stands at the juncture. They are easier to kill hunting travel patterns and they don't get to the scrapes by helicopter. Probably, I would not put much faith in hunting low unless the bottom is thick as all getout. Hard to hunt, no matter how you do it. Great place to rattle, though. Is there any kind of old road on top or up the points? Deer love old logging roads in "ridge and holler" terrain. That is about all we have around here.

From: pointingdogs
26-Oct-18
Thanks guys. Just as I thought. I will hunt the scrapes at the top of the valley that borders cornfields.

From: DMTJAGER
26-Oct-18
Nope never again. None were more bitter than the tears they caused me to shed, learned my lesson though. Heed the advice given here or wish you had.

From: sitO
26-Oct-18
I've been stuck in deep valleys many times, what you want to look for is a shallow valley...she will love you forever

27-Oct-18
Yeah like others have said stay as high as possible.... I shot a big doe in Wisconsin several years ago that tumbled down into this crazy deep valley about 5 minutes into my hunt..... herdbull was with me and I didn't want to mess his hunt up so I went down there and i've had some pack outs living in Colorado but that one was unreal! Man I left all my gear and pulled and drug her up and a couple hours later he came by and I don't know if I ever told you Mike but that drag about killed me and I was in my prime!! Lol.... left my gear and went in the next day I didn't even care I was so beat! However hunting wise the wind is too fickle and the drag sucks! So hunt up high and hope they don't cartwheel to the bottom!

From: Bowriter
27-Oct-18
LOL Rule: No matter where you shoot a deer,it is going to run to worst place it can find to die. Fortunately, they come apart.

From: Hawkeye
27-Oct-18
"I've never had good luck hunting the bottom of those types of valleys. Wind is too fickle. I'd much rather be up the side where a perpendicular deep cut creates a funnel."

+1 Midwest:)

From: Outside
27-Oct-18
High risk but very high reward. I love hunting slopes, it’s such a chess match that I lose more often than not. Deer have such the advantage on those step slopes, they can see danger coming from below and smell danger coming from above. And the thermals let them smell from almost all directions. Find the beds 1/3 of the way down on the leeward side. Then try to find the trail going to the bed. Then get between the bed and a food source or bed and doe beds. I usually get most incounters last light as the buck finally stands and starts he’s way out. You have to be super slow and super quiet going in and setting up. And MOST important is playing the wind. If it’s not in your favor you have to wait or that spot is done. Mr. buck is there because he feels he has the advantage, that’s why he beds there. The best wind is the just off wind where it’s in his face but carring my scent just off his direct direction. And I can guarantee you he will run straight down the steepest slope into the nastiest briar patch in the bottom to take his last breath!

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