Moultrie Products
I stuck a broad head in my leg
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Inshart 27-Nov-18
Trial153 27-Nov-18
1boonr 27-Nov-18
elkmtngear 27-Nov-18
GF 27-Nov-18
RJ Hunt 28-Nov-18
Shiras42 28-Nov-18
Old School 28-Nov-18
wraith8 28-Nov-18
smarba 28-Nov-18
deerhunter72 28-Nov-18
Treeline 28-Nov-18
mrelite 28-Nov-18
mrelite 28-Nov-18
Beendare 28-Nov-18
t-roy 28-Nov-18
Scar Finga 28-Nov-18
Treeline 28-Nov-18
smarba 28-Nov-18
deerhunter72 28-Nov-18
fawn 29-Nov-18
Jaquomo 29-Nov-18
Thornton 29-Nov-18
COHOYTHUNTER 29-Nov-18
deserthunter 29-Nov-18
drycreek 29-Nov-18
jstephens61 29-Nov-18
crankn101 29-Nov-18
snapcrackpop 29-Nov-18
deerslayer 29-Nov-18
KSflatlander 29-Nov-18
WV Mountaineer 29-Nov-18
deerslayer 29-Nov-18
t-roy 29-Nov-18
Treeline 29-Nov-18
Ucsdryder 30-Nov-18
bghunter 30-Nov-18
jstephens61 30-Nov-18
Surfbow 30-Nov-18
GregE 02-Dec-18
jstephens61 02-Dec-18
ground hunter 02-Dec-18
JL 03-Dec-18
IdyllwildArcher 03-Dec-18
JL 03-Dec-18
Dirk Diggler 03-Dec-18
cnelk 03-Dec-18
fawn 03-Dec-18
Dirk Diggler 03-Dec-18
From: Inshart
27-Nov-18
I Stuck a Broadhead in my Leg! Destination Elk - Episode 04 Cory Jacobsen

Every bow hunter should watch this, especially if you hunt alone. This is just plain scary and sent chills through me. I will definitely be adding items to my pack.

Can someone please post a link to this?

From: Trial153
27-Nov-18
A simple commercially Available tourniquet and dressing with a clotting argent is worth the weight

From: 1boonr
27-Nov-18
If he was using expandables it would never happen

From: elkmtngear
27-Nov-18

From: GF
27-Nov-18
Wow. Those guys were AWESOME for keeping their cool so completely.

I don’t know why we don’t all hunt with 18” of stout, Latex tubing worn around our necks. Clotting compound in the pack but right handy, and yeah.... Super Glue.

Any Airborne/Rangers/SEALs care to share what you wear & carry?

From: RJ Hunt
28-Nov-18
In light of that video I ordered Celox and clotting pads for my med kit.

From: Shiras42
28-Nov-18
Always good to be prepared. I will be adding a tourniquet and more tape to my pack. Already carry qwik clot and super glue (and other small stuff).

From: Old School
28-Nov-18
Quick clot, super glue, gauze and duct tape is what I carry. Need to add a tourniquet as well though.

Glad they posted that incident and also what the Dr. stated in the comments below on YouTube. Tourniquet the leg and then check out the wound, dress it and then take off the tourniquet to see if your packing/dressing job will hold up or not. Very good info there.

--Mitch

From: wraith8
28-Nov-18
I was in Bass Pro over the weekend and after seeing the video, I noticed two or three different clotting products in the camping/first aid section. I'm sure if I hadn't seen that episode, I may have noticed those items but certainly would not have spent much, if any, time looking them over like I did now. Planning to make my first trip elk hunting next year, I'm really starting to think about and re-evaluate what I should have for items like that, and what I currently carry.

From: smarba
28-Nov-18
Note that during the prep/wrapping process they are flinging a Havalon around like it's a butter knife. Need to take extreme caution to not cut someone else with that knife! Cutting the game bag and then tearing it while still holding the knife in hand is just asking for a slip up that creates anther major wound...

I may need to add a clotting pack to my emergency kit.

From: deerhunter72
28-Nov-18
Calm, cool, and collected! This is makes me think because I'm taking quite a bit of blood thinning agents now. My daughter cut my finger the other night while we were skinning out a deer and I could barely get it to stop bleeding. It probably should've been stitched. A broadhead would have me pumping blood out at an alarming rate. Don't think I'd be that cool about it.

From: Treeline
28-Nov-18
Reminds me of an incident that happened many years ago on a wilderness elk hunt in New Mexico. Before cell or sat phones.

About 5 miles in and had a hunter shoot an elk. I was 19 or 20 at the time.

He wanted to help skinning and I let him. I was skinning out the front shoulder for the cape and he was working on the hind leg. I heard him yelp and then start cussing. I looked up as he went down.

I asked what happened and he didn’t respond - just sat there looking down. I set my knife down and went around back of the elk to see what was going on. His face was white as a sheet and it really spooked me.

I looked down and saw his knife sticking out of his thigh. Talk about an “Oh Shit” moment!

I was surprised at the lack of massive amounts of blood. It looked to be stuck in about 3” deep in the upper part of his thigh and toward the inside.

I looked at the hunter and told him we were going to have to get that knife out and deal with the wound. He started going a little nuts on me and kept telling me that we couldn’t take it out or he would bleed to death. I assessed the wound and since blood was not squirting out, I hoped that the femoral wasn’t cut but if we moved him with the knife in there, it might do just that. I pulled off my shirt and cut it to use for a bandage and laid it out next to his leg. I had to talk him down and eventually he agreed and looked the other way as I very carefully pulled the knife out. Again, I was surprised that blood didn’t spray out everywhere - just very dark blood and it kind of poured out of the wound. I took some wadded up cloth and pushed down on the wound. He passed out. I grabbed a strip of shirt and pushed it under his leg then up and over. It was really tough to get that around his leg while holding pressure on the wound and him totally out. I was able to get it around and tied so I could free up my hands. The blood soaked up the cloth pretty quick but it appeared to be holding.

I was very shaken up and could not stay on my feet when I stood up and had to sit right back down. After a few minutes, my head cleared and I was able to get up. The hunter started stirring and I went and got him some water. I put another strip around his leg and found a branch to twist and maintain pressure.

He seemed to be better so I started gathering stuff up into our packs. I moved all our gear away from the elk and pulled everything out of my pack except the water and put on my jacket.

He was looking better after some water and rest and I told him we were going to have to walk out. We went very slowly with him leaning on me the whole way out and stopped a lot. That wrap with the stick certainly helped to keep the bleeding down but his whole leg was blood soaked and down int his boot when we finally got back to the truck after 2 in the morning. We were both pretty covered in blood and probably looked like something out of a horror movie. He was in pretty bad shape and I thought he might not make it.

Drove like a madman to the nearest hospital - another 2 hours away. He was out when I got there so I ran in and got help. Not sure how much blood and fluids they put back into him but they got him fixed back up.

I slept a few hours on a couch in the ER and called my boss to let him know what what had happened. He showed up with horses about 10 and we went back in to get the elk and gear we left behind. Ended up having to run a bear off the elk and lost quite a bit of it. We got as much meat and the head pulled together. Loaded it all up on horses and walked the loaded horses out.

The doctors fixed up the hunter and he had a full recovery. They told me he was super lucky that he missed the femoral by about an 1/8”.

That was a very bad situation that I never want to go through again!

There are great products out there now for first aid that should be in everyone’s pack - bandages, clotting agents, and tape. Pretty amazing how good cell coverage is in some pretty remote places but those Spots are another amazing tool to get help in the middle of nowhere.

From: mrelite
28-Nov-18
Smarba, that is exactly what I was thinking as I watched the video, all the Havalon needed was a split second mistake to cut something and from my own experience's it doesn't take much to slice human skin wide open. I am just glad my worst experience with a Havalon was at home and not in the field and for what it is worth I was doing the same thing as those guys with my knife when I cut myself, best thing to do is set the knife down until you need it again.

From: mrelite
28-Nov-18

mrelite's embedded Photo
mrelite's embedded Photo
Figured I'd show what a Havalon can do in a split second, I didn't even feel it and it cut all the way to the bone.

From: Beendare
28-Nov-18
Its worth noting that a roll of good tape and bandage [the clotting bandages with Celox or quick clot] is an important part of your kit.

A buddies dad was leaving for a Bowhunting trip many years ago and while carelessly carrying his arrows out the front door one of the nok ends caught on the door jamb and he walked right into his arrow, burying it in his abdomen. Some pretty obvious lessons here.....

From: t-roy
28-Nov-18
Crazy story, Tavis! That guy was certainly lucky that you were there and you kept your wits about you!

Video was definitely an eye opener. Very fortunate that they had cell reception. I’ll be adding, at least a couple of items in my whitetail pack for sure. It’s not very far back to the house or vehicle, but better safe than sorry.

From: Scar Finga
28-Nov-18
One item to consider is a body stapler, I have used one and they are super easy to use, even on yourself! Ask me how I know:/ They are light weight and pretty small. I also have used them on my hunting dogs for bad injuries in the field.

Be safe!

From: Treeline
28-Nov-18
I almost lost it myself a few times, t-Roy. Certainly would have loved to have at least one more person there. It was a very scary situation.

From: smarba
28-Nov-18
Little bit of a sidetrack but when butchering I wear a cut-resistant glove on my left hand to save me from nicks when holding the knife in right hand. Well worth it and it's saved my hand from looking like mrelite's on more than one occasion despite always trying to be careful. When our daughter is hunting with me I have her wear them on both hands because she's often the one holding while I butcher.

They are only about $10/pair on Amazon and part of my butchering kit, along with disposable rubber gloves, meat bags etc.

From: deerhunter72
28-Nov-18
Based mrelite's pic I did need stitches, but I've spent a lot of time in hospitals this year and refused another trip. It's finally healing.

From: fawn
29-Nov-18
I had the same thing happen to me except I was by myself! I had killed a 4 pt bull and was dragging it a short distance downhill to prop open in the shade for the night, bow slung across my back. Somehow a branch snagged an arrow out of the quiver on my bow, landed nock end down, Zwickey end up, and I backed into it. I didn't feel the cut as it went through dead center on my right calf, but when the broadhead hit the bone, I felt the stop. Looking down, I saw the arrow, which pulled out when I stopped, dark red blood dripping off the heel of my boot. As an ER RN, I assessed the wound, no squirting blood, so no artery hit. I wrapped a bandana tight around my calf which stopped the bleeding, mostly. Since this was my first solo bull, I was alone, worked hard to get the elk and didn't want to lose any meat, and over a mile from the closest road, I skinned, quartered, and hanged the quarters as I wanted to cool it and didn't know when I would be able to return. By staying moving, I was able to keep the calf working. Once I got off the mountain and stopped walking, the calf tightened to the point of immobility. An hour visit to my ER, they cleaned the wound, put a drain in, stitched the rest, put me on antibiotics, and sent me home.

The elk retrieval was a whole other story. I have a friend with horses, so we were able to ride all the way in. Our plan was to tie the quarters over the riding saddles so they would sit evenly like a rider and lead the horses out. We had no problems getting the meat on each horse and tied down. As we headed downhill, my horse and I were about a hundred or so yards ahead of my friend and his horse. We were on a short, downhill course when I noticed the saddle and load on my horse moving forward quickly, pinning the front legs causing my horse to fall. He wasn't hurt, so I started to unload the meat and take the saddle off. My horse just laid there, nice and calm. Suddenly, the other horse came running down the slope, saddle and meat hanging under the horse, my friend running to catch up. I stopped the horse. Apparently his horse had the same thing happen as mine, saddle riding up, horse falling. While he was trying to untangle his horse, he got kicked in the ribs. We ended up hanging the meat up again. My saddle was intact, his was broken. He was having a tough time breathing so I saddled my horse so he could ride it out while I led the other one (riding bareback, downhill was not in this girl's best interest). When we got down, he ended up in the ER, ribs broken and separated from the sternum. Why did the saddles slip? We didn't have the butt straps on the saddles to keep them from moving up! Lesson learned!

BTW, I did recruit another friend who, along with a wheeled cart, managed to get the elk out without incident.

29-Nov-18
I know someone who did it......had to push the arrow through and pull it out. Then drive himself to the hospital. He was lucky it was a meaty part of his leg.

From: Jaquomo
29-Nov-18
The filet glove in my kill kit saved me from a nasty cut two nights ago. Cheap insurance, as is 18" of surgical tubing and Quik Clot.

My survival/first aid kit is always with me in a pack, even when scouting, fishing, biking, whatever. Surprising how many folks think its only needed when "hunting".

From: Thornton
29-Nov-18
I sewed up a similar accident when I worked urgent care. The guy's arrow fell out of his quiver and skewered his thigh.

From: COHOYTHUNTER
29-Nov-18
Duck tape and maxi pads always in my first aid kit.. In my experience work better than gauze to stop bleeding.. Surgical tubing would be a good idea to add..

From: deserthunter
29-Nov-18
Something else to consider and yes I know some of you will have smart comments is tampons and kotex. You would be amazed at how much blood the will soak up. Yes I have first hand experience. Also +2 on the skinstapler.

From: drycreek
29-Nov-18
I have been carrying the clotting gauze in my fanny pack for a couple years now, ever since I've been on coumadin. I'd rather not bleed out in the woods and get et by yotes.

From: jstephens61
29-Nov-18
Remembering my training, you should not pull a knife from a wound, unless absolutely necessary. If may not cut a artery on the way in but could on the way out. Definitely not with a chest wound. Pack with the wound and wrap tightly.

From: crankn101
29-Nov-18
Look into Israeli bandages

From: snapcrackpop
29-Nov-18
And check out the episode where Tim Wells speared/ impaled himself.

From: deerslayer
29-Nov-18

deerslayer's embedded Photo
deerslayer's embedded Photo
I had an incident myself 2 years ago.

After shooting a buck in the morning, I decided to bone him out before crossing the river. I had tagged him on the front leg with a zip tie before dragging him to the spot I wanted to bone him out. Before beginning I decided to cut the zip tie in order to keep the tag from getting covered in blood and to put it in my pack along with the meat when I finished. I have used a Havalon for years, boned out multiple elk, deer, antelope, and always say to people "It's an awesome knife. You just can't make a mistake"!

Well.... I made a mistake... I know the rules of knife safety, but a momentary lapse cost me. While trying to get the zip tie off I slipped, stabbing length ways into my left ring finger. The pain was unreal. I had severed the nerve, and I could instantly feel the tendon retracting into the lower part of my finger. I ended up gutting the buck with one and half hands, dragged him across the river, somehow got him into my truck, dunked the finger in the river to clean it off (major ouch) , and drove to the hospital. A few days later I had surgery and went under to get the tendon and nerve re-attached. I'm super thankful I wasn't in the back country on an elk hunt, but I learned a valuable lesson. I have been pretty fortunate as far as injuries my whole life, but it really can happen to anybody. After my injury I have really made a point to be a lot more purposed when using my knife, especially when solo in the back country. Scary stuff for sure.

From: KSflatlander
29-Nov-18
Don’t use maxi pads or tampons. U don’t want it to soak up blood. U want something as like medical gauze that help clot the blood. That’s why they use gauze in hospitals and why it’s in first aid kits. I guess it feminine products work if u have nothing else.

29-Nov-18
Dang Justin, that looked worse this time then the first time I saw it.

From: deerslayer
29-Nov-18
It hurt like crazy, I can tell you that brother. It's still tingly and slightly numb to this day. Sharp metal objects are no joke. That Havalon is a great tool, but can bite you in a hurry.

From: t-roy
29-Nov-18
Good thing you’ve got ten of em, Justin!

From: Treeline
29-Nov-18
Deerslayer:

Yeeeow! That’s a bad one! Crazy what a really sharp knife can do and how fast it happens!

Jim:

I really had no other option at the time. If I had tried to move him any distance, I think that knife would have cut more and likely cut his femoral. I did push it away from the edge - to the back - when I pulled it out. Almost passed out myself right then! I was one freaked out kid for sure through that whole incident.

Fawn:

funny thing, and I would be surprised if you remember, but you fixed me up a couple of times in Leadville. Once was a broad head incident and another was a knife cut. I gotta say, after that broad head cut, I would never want to actually be shot with one! Amazing how much a guy can bleed from a 3-blade puncture wound and how hard it is to stop that bleeding. Ended up re-opening that wound breaking down a mule deer buck the next day up on the hill and had to glue it back up with fletching cement. Super glue type glues work really well and I actually put that tube in my pack on your suggestion! Thank you!

From: Ucsdryder
30-Nov-18
Treeline cool story! I bet that hunter was thankful to have you around!

I always threaten to get a cut proof glove but I never do. Maybe next year! Those Havalons are scary. The way they cut through that meat like it’s not there....that’s what they’ll do to you too!

From: bghunter
30-Nov-18
How times have changed. Few years ago I mentioned people should carry tourquinets on here. wow did I get slammed for that suggestion. I am glad people are rethinking what a tourquine, good clotting agent and other first aid supplies can do to help. Cheap insurance to say the least. Stay safe out there.

From: jstephens61
30-Nov-18
Travis, each situation has to be assessed first. That’s were training comes in. In any critical situation, you HAVE to maintain your composure. It’s sometimes the difference between living and dieing. My worst was not a hunting accident, but was severe enough to have cost me my life. Obviously it didn’t. The wife will tell you living with me is not boring.

From: Surfbow
30-Nov-18
Based on someone's recommendation on here last year, I started carrying cut-proof gloves for field dressing. I wear one on my non-knife hand, and I haven't had a nick or cut since, plus a grippy gloves really helps hang on to slippery animal parts (which I believe also helps avoid blade accidents). They are cheap enough on Amazon, $7-10, that I don't even try bother to clean the fat and blood out of them, just toss it in the trash when I get home and reload with a clean one. Stay safe fellas, some pretty hairy stories on here!

From: GregE
02-Dec-18
Bump up for emphasis.

Sharp things cut- and don't care what

From: jstephens61
02-Dec-18

jstephens61's embedded Photo
jstephens61's embedded Photo
GregE, you are correct! This was a tape measure a couple weeks ago. Got the tendon.

02-Dec-18
emt gel and super glue and quick clot also should be in your pack

From: JL
03-Dec-18

JL's embedded Photo
JL's embedded Photo
I don't have any cut pics to add....just hook pics. This happened in March. While I was holding a ladyfish I just caught and while trying to unhook it, the fish flipped out of my hand and of course one of the trebles went into my thumb. The fish kept flopping and that hurt until I could put a full headlock on the fish to get it under control. Once we got the fish unhooked, it didn't hurt anymore....kinda went numb. I tried to pull it out with pliers...no luck. Tried to roll it thru and the hook wasn't big enough to push thru. Had to get it cut it out. Something I learned when I had a nasty compound fracture of my big toe...soak it in a warm beta-dine/water solution a couple of times a day for a few days. The doc's said that helps keep any infection from starting....it worked in both my cases. A couple of ounces of beta-dine would be something to carry in a pack if you're in the bush and you spring a small leak. A little humor....I dropped my pole to grab the fish and asked my buddy for some immediate help. He comes over and picks up the pole to move it away not realizing or forgetting the mono is still connected to the lure. He pulls the pole and lure one way while the fish is flopping the other way. I had to yell at him to stop pulling. We had a Three Stooges moment there for a couple of seconds.

03-Dec-18
I'm not sold on the clotting agents for back country use. I just don't think they're going to save anyone. The fact of the matter is, flesh wounds where a sizable artery hasn't been cut will not kill you, just like they don't kill deer. The bleeding is more an annoyance than an emergency, even if they appear to be bleeding quite a bit. When you have a sizable cut and start to lose a fair amount of blood, your body clamps down peripheral vessels when any sizable blood loss occurs, which stops/limits bleeding from becoming dangerous in most non-arterial lacerations.

And a clotting agent isn't going to stop the bleeding from an artery that will kill you. The only thing that stops that bleeding is direct pressure, tourniquets, and/or sewing/clamping off the artery.

We (people who work in an ER) often times have to bite our lips and hide our laughter from people who freak out from what may look like a lot of blood loss, but really is insignificant blood loss. Thorton and fawn will back me up on this as we so often hear from panicking patients/relatives, "I've lost a lot of blood!" or "He's bleeding to death!" while the patient plays the part feigning last seconds of life with a totally normal blood pressure. And they've lost a cup or two of blood, maybe more, but not even enough to even come close to death.

Seriously, you can lose a ton of blood and be just fine. You can suffer a pretty bad flesh wound and be just fine, just as fawn's story shows (so long as you don't panic). A few cups of blood loss looks like a ton of blood, but it's not even close to dangerous. Minor to moderate bleeding is more of an inconvenience than an emergency. In 23 years of medicine counting my nursing and medicine careers and education, besides non-traumatic gastrointestinal hemorrhages, I've never seen anyone bleed to death that didn't have a major artery cut except for the vena cava and femoral vein and in those cases, you will literally see handfuls of blood coming out quickly.

It may be a different scenario for people who are on blood thinners, but there's not a lot of guys on Coumadin going into the back country for days at a time.

And that brings up another issue: I honestly believe that for a lot of guys, that the risk of blood thinners outweighs the potential benefits of taking them if you're on a back country trip. I take my dad off of his daily aspirin 5 days before elk hunts in grizz country because I know the risk of bleeding to death is much higher than the risk of him having an ischemic heart attack/stroke during those two weeks. I'd encourage guys that take aspirin or anticoagulant to ask their doctor, in their specific case, if taking their anticoagulants are actually more dangerous while on a back country hunt. I'd think that your average daily white tail hunting wouldn't make a difference, but I think that taking anticoagulants in the back country is just a bad idea.

From: JL
03-Dec-18
Interesting.....I was doing lovinox injections for a bunch of blood clots. Now I do a daily baby aspirin.....have been for the last 5 years. Not a bad thought to consider stopping the baby aspirin for long bush trips. In my case, I take it to help avoid blood clots again. When I had the infusaport removed from my chest I had to stop the lovinox 2 days ahead of time.

From: Dirk Diggler
03-Dec-18
Funny you say that idyllwildArcher. My dad, we'll call him Dr Diggler for this story, decided to start a daily baby aspirin regiment at 60. He was workin a metal gate latch on a wire gate one winter, a few years into his aspirin regiment. The cotton gloves and cold metal were a bad combination and the metal bar slipped out of his hand and caught him upside the head. Said he seen stars for a bit and sat down till it passed. Over the next couple months he'd get dizzy spells, light headedness and have to sit a bit till they'd pass. (I'm sure you probably already know where this is going, with your occupation idyllwildArcher) . Well one day he was a horseback and he started gettin light headed so he got off and walked it off. Climbed back on and walked the horse a few steps and was told he just fell off. His friends loaded him in the bed of a pickup and drove him to the hospital. Took pictures, he had bleeding on the brain. Drilled a hole, drained the blood, and waited to see if the bleeding stopped. Fortunately it had. The real doc figures that gate latch months earlier had broke a vessel on his brain, and his baby aspirin regiment wouldn't allow it to clot and heal. Dr Diggler has been off the aspirin ever since. Fawn I'm gonna take a stab at your story. You guys rode in, tied the horses up, and loaded the elk. On the ride in the horses lost a little water weight, the leather billets, cinch straps, and cinch stretched a bit cause that's just what they do in a couple miles. Do you remember if you retightened the cinch before loadin the elk? A tight cinch and a decent withers on a horse will keep a saddle from slidein, left, right, or over the top. The only saddles I have brichings on (that strap that goes around their hip from one back cinch D-ring to the other) are my cross buck pack saddles. We were riding out this fall and stopped at a creek to let em drink and I felt my saddle goin over the top. Hopped off quick and adjusted the saddle and retightened the cinch. About that time Dr. Diggler rode up and said "Didn't check yer cinch before we started back did ya?" Dr. Diggler knows horses. Medicine, not so much. I'm puttin a first aid kit together this winter, and takein a wilderness first-aide course before next fall. This is about the 3rd or 4th thread like this I've read recently. I'm takein it as a sign to change my ways. I've been lucky nothings happened over the last 30yrs hunting with a group of 3-10, several miles from the trucks, and having nothing serious happen in all that time. Good post Inshart, with some sound wisdom from others mishaps!

From: cnelk
03-Dec-18

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
Shit happens and it happens fast.

Its been 6 years [Thanksgiving] since my hand got cut - 8 tendons and 1 year of PT, but its functional

From: fawn
03-Dec-18
Dirk Diggler, Yes, we did readjust the straps. The issue was we chose to go pretty much straight down a not so gentle slope instead of zig zagging. A couple hundred yards of that was enough to have the saddles slip forward. I had relied on my friend's "expert" advice as he had owned horses all his life and my knowledge was which end goes forward. Had we put brichings on, we would have been golden. Lesson learned. BTW, a year or two down the road he helped me again. No problems, except when one of the quarters on his horse came loose and swung onto the horse's neck. RODEO!!! But he had a long lead rope, threw a loop around an aspen and snugged the horse up.

From: Dirk Diggler
03-Dec-18
Lol! Yep, no matter how hard we try, havein pack animals on a hunt adds a whole nother element!

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