Summit Treestands
Elk hunt with outfitter that pushes you
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
WiElkslayer 30-Nov-18
ElkNut1 30-Nov-18
midwest 30-Nov-18
Ucsdryder 30-Nov-18
Old School 30-Nov-18
Kodiak 30-Nov-18
Brotsky 30-Nov-18
Jaquomo 30-Nov-18
WV Mountaineer 30-Nov-18
Bloodtrail 30-Nov-18
TD 01-Dec-18
Glunt@work 01-Dec-18
Yellowjacket 01-Dec-18
Aspen Ghost 02-Dec-18
Franklin 02-Dec-18
BigRed 02-Dec-18
Bowsiteguy 03-Dec-18
BigRed 03-Dec-18
Jaquomo 03-Dec-18
Smtn10PT 03-Dec-18
bonehead 03-Dec-18
From: WiElkslayer
30-Nov-18
Hi everyone my hunting partner and I are looking into our second archery Elk hunt. We would like to use an outfitter again to learn some more before we eventually go diy. Our first trip was a success and we had a great time. This time around we would like an outfitter that’s gonna push us physically everyday to get on the elk. We are both in great shape and can handle the load trust me. I want the hunt that you search for the elk and put on the miles. Any suggestions thanks

From: ElkNut1
30-Nov-18
With that persistent type attitude I think you're already ready for a DIY OTC elk hunt! That's half the battle right there! Go for it!

ElkNut/Paul

From: midwest
30-Nov-18
"I want the hunt that you search for the elk and put on the miles."

That sounds exactly like a DIY hunt. You don't need an outfitter.

From: Ucsdryder
30-Nov-18
You’re describing the exact opposite of what an outfitter wants...

From: Old School
30-Nov-18
Go DIY now. With the money you'll save, you've already paid for your next 4 years of elk hunting.

--Mitch

From: Kodiak
30-Nov-18
Agree with the others, forget the outfitters. Just go do it.

From: Brotsky
30-Nov-18
You've got the right attitude for DIY! The reason you use an outfitter is to NOT have to put on the miles finding elk. Get an OTC tag in CO or ID and get in the point game in the other states and go chase some bugles this fall.

From: Jaquomo
30-Nov-18
When I guided for an outfitter I hoped my guys would kill one the first day, with as short a pack out as possible.

Think about it - a guide grinds every day for months. After you leave and go home to recover from the beating, his job keeps going. He gets paid the same whether you push him for miles every day or kill one right by the trailhead.

Agree with the others. Go DIY, go to the CO OTC area where the Born and Raised guys go, and you can push yourself as hard as you want.

30-Nov-18
Lou x 2. An outfitters job is to make it as easy as they can for their clients. Not as hard as they can. If not, there would be no demand for their services.

From: Bloodtrail
30-Nov-18
Haha. You need to instill that into your guide. Push THEM. You will have a great hunt if you do that. They will know you're serious and they will work harder for you. Just get in great shape.

From: TD
01-Dec-18
Sounds more like you'd be dragging a guide around with you..... what they said above. Go DIY, it's not rocket surgery. There's a reason good archery guides are few and far between...... they much prefer glassing off a point and "shoot that one...." Human nature. Like folks said, they're grinding all archery season just to get to rifle season.....

If you've got some money burning a hole in your wallet, use it for trespass fees or landowner tags on some good private land.

From: Glunt@work
01-Dec-18
For elk, the only reason I would pay an outfitter would be to access a great spot that I can't access without him. Going for miles every day to find some elk to hunt is one of the biggest things folks are trying to avoid by hiring outfitters.

I get you want to hit it hard and that can be a great asset when elk hunting but talk it over clearly before booking. The car dealership isn't use to folks looking to buy a new F250 with no power steering, a warped rotor and the #7 injector going bad.

From: Yellowjacket
01-Dec-18
Maybe a drop camp would work for you. Pay an outfitter to pack you in. After that you can go as hard as you want.

From: Aspen Ghost
02-Dec-18
I think TD has a great idea about using your money for trespass fee or landowner tags. You may be disappointed in an outfitter unless you discuss your desires clearly up front and make sure they know you are in good shape and want a guide who is in shape and has the drive to not only keep up with you but push you.

From: Franklin
02-Dec-18
X3 on TD.....if you express these desires to an outfitter he just may drag you up and down..."Drag Ass Canyon" and not put that effort into hunting. Spend some dough and go on your own....you won`t regret it.

From: BigRed
02-Dec-18
Ok... What you're getting here is opinions from several guys who have the entire season usually to hunt, and a bunch of honey holes stashed on the GPS they're not about to let you in on. They're not in tune with the guy who's got 7, maybe 10 days if he really saved his PTO to head west and hope a bull falls in his lap...

Yes, some guides are not going to work as hard as others, that's why he's asking the question.

It's been quite some time since I hunted with him, so I'm hoping he's still getting it done. Look up Scott Limmer with Comanche Wilderness Outfitters. He's a sheep, elk and muley outfitter. He's never had a website that I'm aware of, but that dude works his butt off. And he's got lots of praise from the Colorado Outfitters Association to prove it. And his elk country is high and rugged. You'll want to be in shape.

From: Bowsiteguy
03-Dec-18
"What you're getting here is (sic) opinions from several guys who have the entire season usually to hunt, and a bunch of honey holes stashed on the GPS they're not about to let you in on." There you go. Go for it. If you enjoyed hunting last year with an outfitter, maybe you could just stay with outfitters. That way there's no danger of you stumbling in on one of the honey holes. (grin) What you are actually getting here are recommendations from DIY hunters who know that there's more information on the internet than you are going to be able to absorb, and they feel that you are going to enjoy applying it a heckuva lot more out there on your own, rather than sitting in a camp, getting a dry teat because you want more challenge. There's nothing wrong with hunting with an outfitter, but apparently they feel it sounds like you are the type of new elk hunter who is better served DIY next year. That's all: but, hey, it's still a free country.

From: BigRed
03-Dec-18
Scott does have a website. http://www.comanchewildernessoutfitters.com/

From: Jaquomo
03-Dec-18
Scott is a good guy and runs a quality outfit. It's a horseback-wall tent wilderness hunt in rugged country with some good bulls and a LOT of deadfall in some areas. Scott has asked me to guide for him in the past but I enjoy hunting too much to guide anymore.

If you tell him what you want he can hook you up with a suitable guide. Then spend time on the phone with that guide so he totally understands your expectations. Be prepared to tip him REALLY well whether you score or not, because he won't get paid any more to take you on a forced march than if he were guiding hunters with normal expectations.

Another option would be one of Scott's wilderness drop camps. You'll be in elk country, can push yourself as hard as you want, and will have horses to get you in and you and your elk out.

From: Smtn10PT
03-Dec-18
Look to NW Montana or Idaho if you want a difficult, rugged hunt. I hunted with Wayne Hill in that region, if you kill an elk there you've earned it.

From: bonehead
03-Dec-18
my son and I went with flying b ranch in Idaho this year,booked through Family Expeditions. Rugged terrain, very thick, but a first class outfit, was reasonably priced. Great guides who are fun to be around and will go as hard as you can. great experience . did not get a bull but was 20 yds from 2 nice bulls and did not get a shot as was very thick

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