Moultrie Products
Very, very dark meat
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
GAFFER1 05-Dec-18
greg simon 05-Dec-18
SteveB 05-Dec-18
GAFFER1 05-Dec-18
BowhuntKS 05-Dec-18
GAFFER1 05-Dec-18
SaltyB 05-Dec-18
Kilduff18 05-Dec-18
cubdrvr 05-Dec-18
sitO 05-Dec-18
Franklin 05-Dec-18
t-roy 06-Dec-18
Shawn 06-Dec-18
TrapperKayak 06-Dec-18
Fuzzy 06-Dec-18
cubdrvr 06-Dec-18
cubdrvr 06-Dec-18
deerslayer 08-Dec-18
From: GAFFER1
05-Dec-18
I took a doe yesterday, well placed shot, totally bled out. Something seemed odd with her but it what when I got her home and skinned that things got weird. No body fat at all even her back bone was sticking out. Checked her teeth and the front were worn down to the gun line, back teeth were not much better. She seemed healthy and moved/behaved normally before the shot. The meat was a very dark red, like nothing I've ever seen before. With no acorns this year and snow coming early I bet she was already loosing weight. Having some of her meat tonight, hope it is all right. Anyone else ever see very dark red meat from their deer?

From: greg simon
05-Dec-18
Sounds like a very old deer. As long as the meat does not smell bad it should be good. Probably a little tough!

From: SteveB
05-Dec-18
^^^^^ This.

From: GAFFER1
05-Dec-18
The meat smells fine, I can handle the tough part. No way she was going to make it though the winter

From: BowhuntKS
05-Dec-18
My dad killed a really old doe about 20 yrs ago. We had named her Bertha and left her alone for many years as she always had triplets. When she finally went dry and quit having fawns my dad shot her. Her meat was so dark it was almost purple. Worst eating deer we've ever had. We ate it, but it was pretty nasty.

From: GAFFER1
05-Dec-18
the tenderloins tasted okay but I would not use tender to describe them, lol

From: SaltyB
05-Dec-18
I killed an 8yo buck that had the same deep dark red meat. We ground most of it up into burger assuming it would be tough and gamey. Big mistake. The few steaks we kept were some of the best venison I've ever had. You never know.

From: Kilduff18
05-Dec-18
Old deer I killed a buck we watched for 7 years with a broken ear and the meat was purple when skinned off I’d rather chew on my boots

From: cubdrvr
05-Dec-18
Best deer I ever ate was a fawn just a few spots still showing. Toughest was Alaska moose.(there is a reason they make us non residents shoot the big bulls). I think a safe rule of thumb is young = tender, old =tough, realising there are always exceptions. Had a friend shoot a sleeping calf elk in the head with a rifle; said it wasn’t hardly edible.

From: sitO
05-Dec-18
25% of the folks here are willing to put balls in their mouth, consider the audience.

From: Franklin
05-Dec-18
Depends if they are still in the sack or not....those are most likely our west coast members....lol

From: t-roy
06-Dec-18
Gotta disagree with ya cubdrvr. The bull I killed in Alaska was definitely an older bull, and it was some of the best eating meat I’ve ever had.

From: Shawn
06-Dec-18
Age has little to do with how well meat tastes or even how tender it is. A lot has to do with how the animal died. Spine shot thrashing around having to walk up and shoot it again means stressful death, means tougher meat, double lung, not knowing it has been shot, tender meat. Also how well you take care if the meat and how quickly you get it cool helps a lot. Shawn

From: TrapperKayak
06-Dec-18
Meat darkness often has to do with mitochondria activity. As in flight muscle with ducks vs pheasants. Sustained and often-used muscle meat such as in duck, geese, turkey/pheasant leg muscle (dark meat) or tuna cruising/swimming muscles, tends to be darker, due to the oxygen binding capacity of the mitochondria during sustained activity, like turkeys walking or geese flying. Contrast that with pheasants or turkeys breast meat that is light in color, and used only during burst of use when flushed or perching to roost, or in tuna, burst swimming when feeding (solid white tuna meat). I don't know if this has anything to do with the darkness of your deer meat, but it could be that this deer was very active and trying to feed constantly and sustain body energy to make it through the winter in its old age. Or maybe running alot to escape hunters, bucks, or predators, and therefore lost its body fat, and overworked its muscles causing the mitochondrial activity to make it darker. Who knows, just a scientific theory I thought possible.

From: Fuzzy
06-Dec-18
older deer will be like that. I always can them.

From: cubdrvr
06-Dec-18
Yep Troy, that’s why I qualified and said there are always exceptions;-)

From: cubdrvr
06-Dec-18

From: deerslayer
08-Dec-18
I shot a muley doe this year like that, but I've noticed mulies seem to have darker meat overall. She has tasted good so far.

TrapperKayak, that seems like a very plausible theory.

  • Sitka Gear