Moultrie Products
They Said It Couldn't Be Accomplished
Wild Sheep
Contributors to this thread:
Ward's Outfitters 05-Dec-18
IdyllwildArcher 05-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
Treeline 06-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
Medicinemann 06-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
molsonarcher 06-Dec-18
Charlie Rehor 06-Dec-18
kota-man 06-Dec-18
njbuck 06-Dec-18
Mark Watkins 06-Dec-18
Bowfreak 06-Dec-18
Scoot 06-Dec-18
Beav 06-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
Paul@thefort 06-Dec-18
IdyllwildArcher 06-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
Bowboy 06-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 06-Dec-18
bigswivle 06-Dec-18
HUNT MAN 06-Dec-18
bowhunter24 06-Dec-18
Billyvanness 07-Dec-18
Stekewood 07-Dec-18
ELKMAN 07-Dec-18
BOWUNTR 07-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 07-Dec-18
APauls 07-Dec-18
BOWNBIRDHNTR 07-Dec-18
Mark Watkins 07-Dec-18
axle2axle 07-Dec-18
Charlie Rehor 07-Dec-18
Marty 07-Dec-18
Treeline 07-Dec-18
Beav 07-Dec-18
bigswivle 07-Dec-18
W8N4RUT 07-Dec-18
Treeline 08-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 08-Dec-18
ELKMAN 08-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 08-Dec-18
Will 08-Dec-18
Bowboy 08-Dec-18
Bou'bound 08-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 08-Dec-18
Rancher 08-Dec-18
Treeline 08-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 08-Dec-18
2 Points 08-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 08-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 08-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 08-Dec-18
t-roy 08-Dec-18
otcWill 08-Dec-18
HUNT MAN 08-Dec-18
Whocares 08-Dec-18
Treeline 08-Dec-18
Kurt 08-Dec-18
Heat 08-Dec-18
sticksender 08-Dec-18
molsonarcher 08-Dec-18
TD 08-Dec-18
Bowboy 08-Dec-18
AZ~Rich 08-Dec-18
Tilzbow 08-Dec-18
Stekewood 08-Dec-18
ki-ke 08-Dec-18
Beav 08-Dec-18
Charlie Rehor 08-Dec-18
StickFlicker 08-Dec-18
Bowfreak 08-Dec-18
JRABQ 08-Dec-18
steff 08-Dec-18
Paul@thefort 08-Dec-18
BC173 08-Dec-18
Fauntleroy 08-Dec-18
trkyslr 08-Dec-18
JL 08-Dec-18
Rancher 08-Dec-18
Medicinemann 08-Dec-18
Marty 08-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 09-Dec-18
IdyllwildArcher 09-Dec-18
WV Mountaineer 09-Dec-18
ELKMAN 09-Dec-18
Lone Eagle 09-Dec-18
SDHNTR(home) 09-Dec-18
hunting dad 09-Dec-18
BOWUNTR 09-Dec-18
Ward's Outfitters 09-Dec-18
LWood 09-Dec-18
loesshillsarcher 10-Dec-18
Genesis 10-Dec-18
Mad Trapper 10-Dec-18
njbuck 10-Dec-18
OFFHNTN 10-Dec-18
Ken 10-Dec-18
Drnaln 10-Dec-18
Gus 10-Dec-18
bowana 711 10-Dec-18
bowana 711 10-Dec-18
Chasin Bugles 11-Dec-18
05-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
16 years in the making Waiting every year for that $300.00 credit card hit from the Arizona Game and Fish Department and It finally happened, But we didn’t know who drew the tag. One week later the final results were posted, and I had in fact drawn my Desert sheep tag. The hunt would take place in unit 46b west on the Cabeza Prieta Wildlife refuge which is a wilderness area. Description Cabeza Prieta Wilderness has the distinction of being Arizona's largest Wilderness Area, encompassing nearly 93 percent of the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge. Cabeza Prieta Wilderness spans across isolated and rugged, Sonoran desert landscapes including both the Arizona Uplands and Lower Colorado components which range from 700 to 2,800 feet. Rugged mountains and broad desert valleys, dotted with sand dunes and lava flows, dominate the region. This is a land of solitude, shattered only by the occasional summer monsoon or military overflight. To ensure you are aware of the dangers of unexploded military ordnance, a permit and your signature on a Holdharmless Agreement is required to enter the Wilderness.

Due to illegal border crossings by both people looking for work and drug smugglers, the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol actively patrol the wilderness area.

Management efforts in the area emphasize the preservation of Sonoran Desert ecosystem and an at risk desert bighorn sheep population. More recently, emphasis has been placed on the endangered Sonoran pronghorn. Their numbers in the U.S. crashed to approximately 20 individuals in 2002 but since have increased to well over 200 animals thanks to an active captive breeding program. During your visit, walk carefully among the cryptogamic soils and watch for desert bighorn sheep, Sonoran pronghorn, mule deer, rabbits, kangaroo rats, pocket gophers, and cactus wrens living among the chollas, creosote bushes, mesquite, ocotillo, and even the occasional elephant tree. Hot and dry, conditions at the refuge are ideal for the Saguaro forest and the many reptiles such as side-blotched lizards, desert horned lizards, Great Basin whiptails, and six species of rattlesnakes. Among these are the sidewinders, Mojave, and western diamondback rattlers.

Bordered by Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument to the south and east, and the Barry M. Goldwater Range to the west and north, the Wilderness Area offers brilliant night skies, unmatched desert scenery, and a deafening desert silence. Rare experiences include a walk on a prehistoric trail, a glimpse of an endangered Sonoran pronghorn sprinting across playa lakes, and the opportunity to see wildlife and desert fauna indicative of Southwest Arizona.

Across the southern half of the refuge runs an active 4-wheel-drive trail (a non-wilderness corridor), and the remains of El Camino del Diablo (The Devil's Highway), a trail first blazed in 1540. This infamous trail once connected Sonora, Mexico to California and now provides access to the Wilderness.

At the Refuge visitor center, you can sign the required military hold harmless agreement. The greatest obstacles to your safety include possible encounters with old mine shafts, unexploded military ordnance, illegal border activity, and a rugged, unforgiving landscape where summer temperatures routinely range above 105 degrees F during the day and remain above 90 degrees F at night between May and October. Water is scarce everywhere out here (as little as 3 inches of annual precipitation on the west side), even for the wildlife. Hikers will find no maintained trails. You must bring your own water, at least 1 to 1 ½ gallons per person per day on cool days of 100 degrees or lower. In addition, Cabeza Prieta shares 56 miles of border with Mexico. Illegal smuggling activities are common and visitors should take all necessary safety precautions. Illegal activities can occur anywhere within the refuge.

The best time to visit is during the winter months, especially following a wet year, by desert standards, when the desert wildflowers are in bloom. In the winter, carry extra clothing for cold nights. Dress in layers and be prepared for temperatures which may drop down into the 30 degree range. Lightweight rain gear and sturdy hiking shoes may add comfort to your trip during sudden thunderstorms or cross country hikes through cactus and cholla bajadas.

05-Dec-18
Nice. I've been putting in there for the past 5 years. It'll be cool to see a hunt there. Glad to see you get to do some hunting for yourself Steven.

06-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The Green Line indicates the roads you could Drive.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The Green Line indicates the roads you could Drive.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Russ Richardson with his Great Cabeza Ram
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Russ Richardson with his Great Cabeza Ram
The Cabeza has two roads that Cross the unit one being the El Diablo which is on the south side and the other being Christmas pass road that is on the east end and is partially the border of the unit. When I verified, I had drawn the Cabeza my first call was to Russ Richardson a good friend of mine who had harvested a great ram in 2017 on the cabeza with his bow. Russ was quick to send me maps he had made with locations he had hunted and seen rams. I wanted so bad to go explore the unit and learn the area, but it was July and the temps in the unit reach well over 115 degrees daily and I knew it was just too dangerous.

06-Dec-18
If you all know me, you know I’m a bit of a fitness freak during the off season from Outfitting. I know that this hunt was going to be very physical and I better be in the best shape of my life in order to make the most of this once in a lifetime hunt. During training in the off season I typically don’t do much Cardio I mainly work on putting on as much muscle mass as possible. With that said I knew my endurance needed to be my top priority because 10 plus mile days were going to be the norm on this hunt. I began training twice a day focusing on cardio and endurance in the morning and building muscle in the evenings. Three days of the week I would go out and shoot 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 3 arrows at each distance and jog to and from the target, If I missed my cardboard sheep’s vitals any one of the 3 shots I had to do that jog and shot distance again. I knew this would really make me concentrate and focus on form while being winded at the longer distances. I will admit the first week it was brutal when I got to the longer distances, I kept missing one of the three shots and I was getting really pissed to say the least. Well after a week of this I was conditioned to this and had overcome the misses. The other three days I would climb a mountain 2.2 miles round trip. I began with a typically loaded pack with optics, tripod, 60 oz of water, glassing stool and bow. The pack weighed approximately 38 pounds. The hike was relatively easy at first, I was only having to take a few breaks before reaching the top. After a few weeks of this training I decided to load the pack with 90 pounds and make the trip to the top. On the first trip up, I noticed I wasn’t feeling right and had to stop, I was having weird chest pains and felt nauseous. I contributed it to drinking my coffee to fast, so I took a short break and began the climb again. I made it about half way and again chest pains and I felt dizzy. Now I was getting concerned but I continued. I had to stop 5 times before reaching the top and I felt really bad . When I reached the top I rested and unloaded the weights from my pack and returned home. I was wasted and felt super tired and sleepy, It took me 2 days to recover and I knew something wasn’t right.

From: Treeline
06-Dec-18
Sweet! Got 24 years applying for sheep in AZ... Still just maybes. Looking forward to your recap!

06-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
I thought I might Die falling off this
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
I thought I might Die falling off this
Sorry Guys I have coues deer Clients in camp . I will get you caught up in the evening .

From: Medicinemann
06-Dec-18
It will be worth the wait....

06-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Squeekee Clean Arteries
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Squeekee Clean Arteries
Fast forward a few weeks I’m in the ER with chest pains and have to stay overnight. The Dr. contributed it to training to hard. Fast forward again to November 11th and Not a single day of training since August and After seeing 3 different Dr.s they found that I had damage to my left ventricle they think caused by an infection and my aortic valve was regurgitating, but I was cleared to go on this hunt !!!!

From: molsonarcher
06-Dec-18
Waiting not so patiently Steve!

06-Dec-18
I’m sure He’s busy getting hunters their deer. Congrats Steven!

From: kota-man
06-Dec-18
Congrats again Steven... Awesome accomplishment.

From: njbuck
06-Dec-18
I knew it was only a matter of time before you put a Ram down for the count. Congrats again Steven.

Now hurry up with the story!!!

From: Mark Watkins
06-Dec-18
Bring it on!!!

Mark

From: Bowfreak
06-Dec-18
I'm tuned in. Most importantly though, glad your health issues worked out.

From: Scoot
06-Dec-18
Great stuff! Looking forward to this story. I hope your health stuff is no biggie.

From: Beav
06-Dec-18
Can't wait for the rest of this one!

06-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
two rams at a distance of 2 miles, one dink and another good ram.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
two rams at a distance of 2 miles, one dink and another good ram.
Ok now for the hunt report I arrived in the unit on Wednesday night 11-30 and set up a small tent in the border of the wilderness. The hunt Starts December 1st this gave us a few days of learning the area, My plan was to glass basically from the road until about 11 am and then I had to go meet my compadres Joe Jeff and Delbert to show them where we would camp. I will say we weren’t roughing it , Delbert brought his son in laws toy hauler for a place to shower and sleep. We were also prepared to spend a few nights on the wilderness if needed. Friday morning we drove every road we were authorized too travel, stopping occasionally to glass what looked like great habitat. At about 1130 I finally spotted two rams at about 2 miles away.

06-Dec-18
Friday Night we were in camp contemplating on where we should start hunting the following morning I was having a hard time making a decision, I kept thinking ok we have two shooter rams found but they are a 2 hour drive away, Or should I just hike into the canyon south of camp and hunt that area even though we haven’t been in there. Well the Decision was made to hike into the canyons south of camp , it was 2 miles to the head of one of the main canyons and to get into quality sheep country. But from this area we could glass the west facing slopes. The morning started out great, I glassed up a small ram on the very top of a giant hill. While in the big canyon we would glass for about an hour then move quarter to half mile and glass again hoping to find a ram we couldn’t see from the previous glassing point. The Cabeza Prieta mountains are really cut up, with rock bluffs and small canyons everywhere. At around 11am we decided to head east into a basin to glass the rest of the afternoon. It didn’t take Joe long with his Swarovski btx to glass up a ran ¾ up bedded, We really couldn’t tell what he was from where we were so we made a move closer. The ram ended up being a dink 140 class.

06-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
70 yards 145-150 class ram First Stalk
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
70 yards 145-150 class ram First Stalk
Not long after Joe glassed up the small ram Jeff calls us over, he has a ram located really low on the mountain. When I looked at him, I knew he wasn’t a giant but looked to be close to 150 class. I decided to make a stalk. With the wind in my face I traveled down a dry creek bed and had the plan to approach up a small canyon to the northwest of him, I figured if he stayed in the same little canyon, I should be able to get to his level and peek over. It took about one hour, and I was on top of the ridge and was using a saguaro as a reference as to where he should be. I was sure to catch my breath about 10 yards below the crest, I knocked an arrow and slowly peeked over the ridge. To my surprise he was right there standing on a rock ledge at 70 yards. I looked him over pretty good and snapped a photo of him with my phone after I decided he wasn’t what I wanted to harvest on the first day of a 31-day long season. while I was deciding weather or not to shoot him, he fed to 40 yards, and then turned and fed away. I had officially passed on my first Desert Bighorn Sheep.

From: Paul@thefort
06-Dec-18
Passing on any legal Desert Ram has to be hard especially at 40 yards. Good luck Steven as I know there has to be something bigger in the near future. my best, Paul

06-Dec-18
Steven, what's with the white stuff in the vessels coming off of your heart? Is that ice?

06-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The ram bedded just prior to the helicopter scaring him
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The ram bedded just prior to the helicopter scaring him
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Day 2

After hiking 10 miles on day 1 we decided to top that with a trip into a long canyon that eventually became a basin. It was 2 miles to the head of the canyon in which we arrived at gray light. We again began glassing and Moving into the canyon much the same as the day before. It was 11 am and we hadn’t seen a single sheep, we all were scratching our heads like what the freak this canyon looks so promising. Again, we moved deeper into the canyon hoping to find a ram in a stalkable position or even just a sheep. This time the move was to a small knoll in the middle of the canyon about 1 mile from our last vantage point, it wasn’t 5 min later and Joe said I got a sheep!! It’s a big Ram !!! The ram had just come out of a cut and was feeding to the north around the ridge he was on, 5 min later he disappeared but we knew we should be able to hike farther into the canyon to get an angle on the canyon he went into. It took us about 20 min to get into position and we found him right away bedded in a spot where he could see the valley we were in, I knew it was going to be a major issue and challenge just getting to the base of the hills was bedded in. My plan was to move slowly directly toward him and try to get below him enough, so he couldn’t see me. I started moving and when I got to 300 yards, he nailed me and stood. I knelt and deployed my ultimate predator Sheep decoy and showed it to him to my surprise he stared at it and then bedded. I then had to move to his right about 200 yards at about 150 he nailed me again. I again showed the decoy and he again bedded. At this point he was facing away from me, so I made a quick move into the small wash that would lead me to the ridge I would climb. I again had a small saguaro as a reference I knew if I got to that saguaro that was above him I would have a 40-60 yard shot. I had finally made it to where he couldn’t see me and I began climbing the treterious Cabeza Mountains. I was thinking the entire time while climbing this ram is toast . Wind is perfect and I am now on solid granite rock that is super quiet to stalk on. When I was about 90 yards from reaching the saguaro I decided to take a 1 min break to catch my wind. That when it all when to hell. I heard the chopping of the wind at a distance of a helicopter and it was getting closer. It wasn’t 30 seconds later and that Homeland Security blue and white bird was flying 100 feet at 230 mph right over mine and the sheep’s head. That’s when it I got the call Abort , Abort , Abort the sheep is gone. Yes I was carrying a radio but it was only utilized for this type of situation , at no time was it used to help me to harvest a ram.

From: Bowboy
06-Dec-18
Congrats and waiting for the rest of the story

06-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
I started to figure out The Rams would move up in the evenings at a minimum of 300 yards from the floor
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
I started to figure out The Rams would move up in the evenings at a minimum of 300 yards from the floor
Too say the least I was disappointed, but oh well it was only day 2 and I had plenty of time left. As I was walking back to join up with the guys, I was thinking It’s going to happen Day Two and Two quality stalks already and I was confident that if it hadn’t had been for the helicopter, I would have at least got a shot. We decide that it was time to start the long walk out and we should stop and glass as we go, well what do you know at about 1 mile down the canyon two rams, One looked like a shooter and we took off because they were pretty low. By the time we got there they had already worked their way to the very top and were feeding. Dang it I thought I was going to get two stalks, we ended the day seeing 3 rams and totaled just over 13 miles of hiking.

From: bigswivle
06-Dec-18
This awesome, keep it coming!!!!

From: HUNT MAN
06-Dec-18
Loving this. Thanks for taking the time. Hunt

From: bowhunter24
06-Dec-18
Thanks for the thread and glad your doing well.

07-Dec-18
Great stuff Steven!

From: Stekewood
07-Dec-18
Loving this hunt. Look forward to more.

From: ELKMAN
07-Dec-18
Awesome!

From: BOWUNTR
07-Dec-18
Outstanding... following this... Ed F

07-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The ram when I glassed him.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The ram when I glassed him.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The vIew to where the sheep was , you can see the huge Desert floor
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The vIew to where the sheep was , you can see the huge Desert floor
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The arrow indicates where the ram is
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The arrow indicates where the ram is
Day 3 We decided to take a short drive to the west to glass a basin we had scouted 3 rams, I knew two of the rams were dinks but because we were so far away, I wanted to get a better look at the third. We arrived at first light and honestly, we were welcoming the fact that we only had to hike a mile to be where we wanted to glass from. We hadn’t sat down for 10 min and We were already seeing the sheep we were looking for we found all three rams and started sizing them up with the BTX , well to say the least not one of them were shooters. We all were pretty excited on the other hand because from our vantage we could see a ton of country we weren’t able to while scouting from the road. Over the past few days of glassing we had become accustom to hours of scanning the chopped up canyons without seeing a single sheep So, we were prepared to sit on our glassing stools for hours glassing this basin. During this hunt I had learned a few things already. One being that it’s a lot like coues deer hunting glassing for hours on end were the norm. Sheep go where ever the hell sheep want to go. The bigger rams seemed to be on the lower portions of the mountains and they almost always head straight up when spoked or headed out. Today was also a bit different the sun was out in full force and that good and bad . Good because the white sheep butts will be bright but bad because we were already getting fried. During this period of time I was glassing the sunny slopes first pretty fast the slowing down on the shadowed areas. I was scanning the bottom third of the mountain when I slowed down in a shadowed canyon and bam a sheep, 200 yards from the basin floor, I stared at it for about 30 seconds and it lifted its head , I said Ram!! Looks like a stud !! Joe was already glassing with his BTX so I double checked where the ram was in my glass and shifted to his and when I put the 35 power BTX on the ram I didn’t hesitate , I said shooter and came out of the glass and went straight for my Sitka Stalking pack and bow. I told the boys I can kill that ram. In order to get to the ram I had to cross a big flat that was about a mile wide, I was concerned the ram would catch me in the flats because they often just stand and stare across this huge desert bottoms. I moved swiftly and tried to keep as much cover as possible occasionally stopping to glass the ram to be sure he wasn’t watching me.

From: APauls
07-Dec-18
It's go time!! Thakns for bringing us with

From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
07-Dec-18
Can't wait to keep following along....grab a handful of Chicharonnes and keep typing!

From: Mark Watkins
07-Dec-18
Awesome!!!

Mark

From: axle2axle
07-Dec-18
Cool hunt...keep it coming! Kevin

07-Dec-18
I love reading about archery sheep hunts!

From: Marty
07-Dec-18
Only one problem with this story...you aren't typing fast enough!

From: Treeline
07-Dec-18
What Marty said....

From: Beav
07-Dec-18
Tell your clients they are in charge of themselves until this story is complete! Lol

From: bigswivle
07-Dec-18
My patience is running thin!!!!!!

From: W8N4RUT
07-Dec-18
Cmon Steve!

Scott

From: Treeline
08-Dec-18
Figured Steve must have lost the thread to be able to complete his hunt recap so bumping it up!

08-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
I knew the wind was going to be shifty for the next hour or so as the sunny slopes and shadows caused different thermals. I finally was out of view of the ram around the corner from his canyon and I decided to work up the ridge to the east of him I was sure to work up the shoot as careful as possible, I didn’t want to make too much noise and was trying my best to not roll any big rocks. At one point I had the plan to work toward him but I couldn’t because the rock bluffs I was also thinking there is no possible way I can come down the mountain the same way I was going up. I looked up above and knew if I could make it to that bench above me 200 yards I would for sure be above him and it looked like I could maneuver toward him. It seemed like it took me an hour or more to get to the 5-foot-wide saddle leading into the canyon I knew he was in just before committing I knocked an arrow and slowly crept over glassing and ranging at the same time. I also knew he must still be in the canyon somewhere because I haven’t received the dreaded Abort radio call. I finally was confident enough that he wasn’t where I could see him. I decided to commit myself to the flat area in the saddle that was 4 feet wide I was sure to watch my shadow, I didn't want it cast across the canyon where he could see it. I stood motionless for about 15 min waiting to catch movement, every bird and even a rock squirrel caught my attention and made my heart rate raise.

From: ELKMAN
08-Dec-18
Love it!

08-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
On top of the bluff That little cactus was a pain in the ass
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
On top of the bluff That little cactus was a pain in the ass
As I stood in the saddle , to my right I was contemplating climbing the razorback ridge that ran to the bottom of the mountain. Only one problem how do I get on top of it. I felt as though it would be the perfect place to sit and wait for the ram to feed up to my position. I was very confident the ram was more than 150 yards away because i could see down the canyon at least that far. After about 5 min of mustering enough confidence to climb the bluff I went for it.

From: Will
08-Dec-18
This is the best thing on Bowsite in a long time - AWESOME to read!

From: Bowboy
08-Dec-18
Reading this post is like I'm right there with Steve. Please keep it coming!

From: Bou'bound
08-Dec-18
Girls to show the “they’s“ are normally fairly uninformed and Unaccountable

08-Dec-18
As you can see from the picture above, I could only go about 15 feet because that razorback dropped off into a 25-foot-deep cut. I say that cactus was a pain in the ass because I had to sit on my backside in order to get down a 6-foot ledge just beyond the cactus. Man, it was scary I slide on the left side of it and had no choice but to brush up against the spiny SOB. When I finally got past and to the bottom of the ditch, I felt relieved, I hadn’t fallen and still no Abort call. From this vantage I could see really well in the canyon, I renocked and started scanning the canyon, after about 5 min of staring and glassing into the bottom I decided for some reason to check my radio, i looked down and tilted the screen so I could see it and SOB it was off!!!! I hit the power button and it immediately turned off again, the freaking batteries were dead. I instantly turned my attention to Joe and Delbert 2 miles away and glassed them, to my relief they were buried in their glass still looking in my direction. During those few brief seconds so many thoughts crossed my mind, was he still there, did he bust me, how long has he been gone, I climbed this mother freaker for nothing. Man, I was really relieved to see the boys still looking into the canyon, I knew he had to be in their just below me somewhere. It wasn’t seconds after all this went through my mind, I caught movement just below me, There he was he just walked out from a big boulder feeding to the left and up the canyon. I instantly pulled out my el range and started targeting him. 108 adjusted to 92 yards, 88 adjusted to 62 but no shot. He fed in this paloverde tree for about 5 min then started working up even more, He was feeding in the absolute middle of the canyon which was brushy, and I was having a hard time getting a clear shooting lane. I was contemplating trying to squeeze one into him but thought why he’s coming right toward me. If he continues, he’s going to walk within 30 yards from me. The ram fed between 52 and 60 for about 10 min then he stopped and stared directly away from me motionless. Oh crap I knew this wasn’t good, he was fixing to make a move, a move away from me. I started ranging different paths he might exit, he’s standing at 62 yards but no shot, I’m ready release on the string. What seemed like an eternity might have only been 5 minuets but the ram begins to walk and he walks directly away from me and goes up a cliff that I didn’t range , I didn’t figure he would go up that steep cliff, well I was wrong and I had no idea the range, he was walking adding distance every step. I grunted at him and he stopped and quartered slightly to his right. I guessed the yardage at 75, but who the freak knows with the angle, I guessed 55 and placed the 50-yard pin on his back and loosed the arrow! Oh, Crap I missed. I couldn’t believe it. The ram ran down the hill and stopped looking back toward where the arrow had shot right over his back and smashed the rocks. I nocked another arrow and watched the ram disappear behind the bluffs below me but on my ridge. I thought to my self if he does what spooked sheep do, he might come right to me. I shifted my position to the right and moved about 10 feet to where I could see the canyon I had climbed to get to my vantage, Ag I was climbing up that canyon I noticed Sheep beds and benches that they had been traveling for years.

From: Rancher
08-Dec-18
Awesome read

From: Treeline
08-Dec-18
Glad Steve was able to find the thread again! Got me on the edge of the seat hitting the little refresh arrow!

08-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The bench the ram walked on 18 yards below my location The black line indicates where he traveled, and the red x is where I shot him.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
The bench the ram walked on 18 yards below my location The black line indicates where he traveled, and the red x is where I shot him.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Where the ram Died
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Where the ram Died
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
As he lay expired. The arrow worked out.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
As he lay expired. The arrow worked out.
I felt confident the ram would head straight up somewhere in the canyon I had climbed so I began ranging what again looked like the most promising spots he might travel. The yardages I’m going to give are the corrected angles, directly across is 55, the farther bench on my ridge is 30 and the bench right below me is 18. As I sit, I’m watching the bottom of the mountain trying to see if he is going to make an exit around the bottom, just then I see just the mass of his horns, boom my heart rate instantly elevated. He’s about 50 yards from me, I only got a half second glimpse of him. Now I know he’s taking one of two benches, 30 or 18. I’m sitting and make a slight shift of my body to be sure I have the proper body angle to make the 18-yard shot that was a bit off to my right. I have the release on the string and have the bow up in the ready to draw position, I see the rams nose poke out and I draw I know he’s at 30 and he walks 3 steps and stops on a ledge, but a rock is covering his entire vitals. I’m thinking when he steps out I’m going to hammer him before he goes off that ledge, He stands for about 15 second and instead of going into the open he turns and walks directly toward me, no shot he walks 7 or 8 steps and disappears behind the bluff 15 feet in front of me his only option now is the 18 yard bench, I’m at full draw holding waiting, I see him stepping out and I’m already shifted and in position for the shot , he goes behind a small bush and when he steps out I follow him with my 30 yard pin on his heart and I punched the trigger, Yep I punched it and the arrow hammered him going in just behind the shoulder and poking out his guts on the opposite side. The ram ran across the bench and went to a bluff standing there, I was shaking so bad I couldn’t even glass him at 60 yards I thought he was going to for sure fall off the cliff , he turned toward me and died as he was bedding in a super tight little rock crack.

From: 2 Points
08-Dec-18

08-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
the ledge I had to traverse to get to him.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
the ledge I had to traverse to get to him.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
placing the only rope we had around his horns to try to get him to us.
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
placing the only rope we had around his horns to try to get him to us.
When I finally got to the ram I was disappointed that I couldn’t even get to him. I had just killed my ram and couldn’t lay hand on his him. I waited for my buddies to arrive and made calls to my family and advised them that I had killed my ram to say the least I was pretty emotional.

08-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
And finally the trophy photos.

08-Dec-18

Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo
Ward's Outfitters's embedded Photo

From: t-roy
08-Dec-18
Great recap of an incredible adventure! Congrats on a great ram, Steven!

From: otcWill
08-Dec-18
Wow! Fantastic recap! Thanks so much for taking the time to share something most will only experience through pictures and written word. Congrats!

From: HUNT MAN
08-Dec-18
Amazing all the way around

From: Whocares
08-Dec-18
Great story and congrats! I enjoy roaming Arizona desert and spotting the sheep but its only a dream hunt for me. Thanks for taking me along!

From: Treeline
08-Dec-18
Great hunt! Way to hold it together and get it done! Congratulations!

From: Kurt
08-Dec-18
Congrats! Nothing like a desert sheep hunt!

From: Heat
08-Dec-18
That is so cool man! Thanks for sharing your story with us. That is some unforgiving country right there. Way to get it done!

From: sticksender
08-Dec-18
Beautiful desert ram....congrats on getting it done with your bow. That is a difficult accomplishment which few will ever achieve. Love the looks of that country!

From: molsonarcher
08-Dec-18
Awesome ram Steve. Congrats on a great animal and your achievement.

From: TD
08-Dec-18
THAT is why I love bowsite. So well done, felt like I was there. Incredible.

Congrats Steven. A dream come true. And thanks for takin' us all along on it.

From: Bowboy
08-Dec-18
Congrats on a great ram!

From: AZ~Rich
08-Dec-18
Beautiful hunt! That’s some unforgiving country for sure. Trophy of a lifetime...Congrats to Steve and his crew!!

From: Tilzbow
08-Dec-18
Great read. Thanks for sharing and congratulations!

From: Stekewood
08-Dec-18
Excellent! Congratulations.

From: ki-ke
08-Dec-18
Incredible story!

Thanks for taking us along.

From: Beav
08-Dec-18
What an animal and what a hunt! Congrats and thank you for the recap!!

08-Dec-18
You did it well! Great to read/feel your humble appreciation. Good things happen to good people. Congrats!

From: StickFlicker
08-Dec-18
Congratulations Steven, and thanks for sharing all the details of the hunt. Brings back many of my own memories.

From: Bowfreak
08-Dec-18
Awesome story? I assume it was hard work reeling him in with that rope too? Must have been super satisfying to finally get your hands on him.

From: JRABQ
08-Dec-18
Wow, great story/adventure, congrats!

From: steff
08-Dec-18
Congrats Steven! Great ram and great story. Thanks for sharing

From: Paul@thefort
08-Dec-18
We knew you were a good outfitter, but how we know you as a hunter and story teller. Nicely done. my best, Paul

From: BC173
08-Dec-18
Man, the the stuff dreams are made of.

Congratulations on a great hunt.

From: Fauntleroy
08-Dec-18
Great write up! Incredible ram and even cooler that your buddies were there.

From: trkyslr
08-Dec-18
Awesome Steven!!! Well done!

From: JL
08-Dec-18
Congrats and thanks for taking the time to post up the pics and tell the story.

From: Rancher
08-Dec-18
Awesome post Steven,congrats on a hard earned trophy.

From: Medicinemann
08-Dec-18
So, your radio is dead, and your friends were watching from 1-2 miles away. I assume that they watched the whole thing unfold, so how long did it take them to get over to you and shake your hand? How long to recover the ram? Did you pull it up, or lower it down?

From: Marty
08-Dec-18
Great job!

09-Dec-18
The boys arrived in about 2 hours , leaving all of the optics and unnecessary gear on the desert floor for us to get on the way out, As for pulling the ram it was a sticky situation , If it falls where it is, it crashes 40 feet or more , We had to pull it over the top of itself and then a foot toward us to lower it onto a small bench with an elephant tree to stop it, We pulled on it for about 5 min and finally got it to where we wanted to lower it. We didn't have to lower it because the rope broke and it fell exactly where we wanted to fall

09-Dec-18
Grats! Great ram! What a dream tag. Thanks for posting.

09-Dec-18
Awesome stuff man!

From: ELKMAN
09-Dec-18
Truly a once in a lifetime experience. Congrats!

From: Lone Eagle
09-Dec-18
Congratulations, what an accomplishment!

From: SDHNTR(home)
09-Dec-18
Amazing! Great story and a fantastic ram.

From: hunting dad
09-Dec-18
Congrats, that is the last AZ animal I need to harvest. Which vortex did you use?

From: BOWUNTR
09-Dec-18
Bad ass.... Congrats. Ed F

09-Dec-18
I used the 100 grain 2.75

From: LWood
09-Dec-18
Congratulations, Steven. Thanks for sharing your adventure.

Lenny

10-Dec-18
Congrats!! Beautiful ram!!

From: Genesis
10-Dec-18
Beautiful Ram! Good job!

From: Mad Trapper
10-Dec-18
Outstanding!!! Congrats!

From: njbuck
10-Dec-18
Way to Go Steven! I knew it was only a matter of time. Great right up as well

From: OFFHNTN
10-Dec-18
GREAT story and ram! Congratulations!!!

From: Ken
10-Dec-18
Great ram. Thanks for taking the time to share the story with us.

From: Drnaln
10-Dec-18
Congratulations on a great ram! Thanks for the story.

From: Gus
10-Dec-18
Congratulations! Awesome ram!

From: bowana 711
10-Dec-18
Steve I know the feeling you with through. Great Job. may our paths cross one day. You Did Great.

From: bowana 711
10-Dec-18
Steve I know the feeling you with through. Great Job. may our paths cross one day. You Did Great.

11-Dec-18
Congratulations. Awesome ram. Thanks for sharing.

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