Professional Bowhunters Society
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
ground hunter 25-Dec-18
grizzley21 25-Dec-18
grizzley21 25-Dec-18
Ucsdryder 25-Dec-18
Franklin 25-Dec-18
Glunker 26-Dec-18
Bowriter 26-Dec-18
Bou'bound 26-Dec-18
Preston Lay 26-Dec-18
Thunderflight 26-Dec-18
Preston Lay 26-Dec-18
Buffalo1 26-Dec-18
ground hunter 26-Dec-18
arlone 26-Dec-18
Ken Taylor 26-Dec-18
BC173 26-Dec-18
Jaquomo 26-Dec-18
Ollie 26-Dec-18
Bowriter 26-Dec-18
Jaquomo 26-Dec-18
Ollie 26-Dec-18
Boreal 26-Dec-18
Jaquomo 26-Dec-18
JTV 26-Dec-18
Starfire 26-Dec-18
Preston Lay 26-Dec-18
Scar Finga 26-Dec-18
Preston Lay 26-Dec-18
ryanrc 26-Dec-18
Scar Finga 26-Dec-18
steff 26-Dec-18
Bou'bound 26-Dec-18
Preston Lay 26-Dec-18
Jaquomo 26-Dec-18
Spookinelk 26-Dec-18
Pat Lefemine 26-Dec-18
Kurt 26-Dec-18
Charlie Rehor 26-Dec-18
EIStone 26-Dec-18
Altizer 26-Dec-18
Jaquomo 26-Dec-18
Altizer 26-Dec-18
Kevin Dill 26-Dec-18
keepemsharp 27-Dec-18
Missouribreaks 27-Dec-18
ground hunter 27-Dec-18
hawkeye in PA 27-Dec-18
PECO 27-Dec-18
Missouribreaks 27-Dec-18
JusPassin 27-Dec-18
Missouribreaks 27-Dec-18
Jeff Holchin 27-Dec-18
harmonypbs 27-Dec-18
Missouribreaks 27-Dec-18
cnelk 27-Dec-18
Hookedspur 27-Dec-18
Michael Schwister 27-Dec-18
Boreal 27-Dec-18
Jeff Holchin 27-Dec-18
PECO 27-Dec-18
Ollie 27-Dec-18
Whip 27-Dec-18
matt schuster 27-Dec-18
Ambush 27-Dec-18
Missouribreaks 27-Dec-18
The Night Stalker 27-Dec-18
JulianT 27-Dec-18
Jaquomo 27-Dec-18
midwest 27-Dec-18
PA-R 27-Dec-18
NY Bowman 27-Dec-18
Whip 27-Dec-18
Bou'bound 27-Dec-18
Phil Magistro 27-Dec-18
ryanrc 27-Dec-18
Jon Simoneau 27-Dec-18
Brotsky 27-Dec-18
SJR Bows 27-Dec-18
Single bevel 27-Dec-18
Ucsdryder 27-Dec-18
Whip 27-Dec-18
Kevin Dill 27-Dec-18
Altizer 27-Dec-18
Hookedspur 27-Dec-18
EIStone 27-Dec-18
stagetek 27-Dec-18
Myke 28-Dec-18
Photoman 28-Dec-18
Photoman 28-Dec-18
Michael Schwister 28-Dec-18
Photoman 28-Dec-18
Missouribreaks 28-Dec-18
midwest 28-Dec-18
matt schuster 28-Dec-18
Missouribreaks 28-Dec-18
Robear 28-Dec-18
Kevin Dill 28-Dec-18
GVS 28-Dec-18
Ambush 28-Dec-18
skipmaster1 28-Dec-18
ryanrc 28-Dec-18
BenP 28-Dec-18
Dave Lay 28-Dec-18
Charlie Rehor 29-Dec-18
Forester 30-Dec-18
stykshooter 30-Dec-18
Cyclic-Rivers 10-Jan-19
COHOYTHUNTER 10-Jan-19
primitve 12-Jan-19
Thumper-tx 12-Jan-19
lawdy 12-Jan-19
ground hunter 12-Jan-19
25-Dec-18
looks like you need to shoot a few animals to meet regular membership in this group. I might be wrong, but seems to lean towards traditional hunting, which is great, but was wondering about compound shooters, like Chuck Adams, Tom Miranda, Frank Noska, Dr Jack Frost, Dwight Schuh, etc, I was wondering if they were also members.....

think of joining but I am on the fence, just curious, making no judgements, I am sure they are all fine people, just the feeling I get from my inquiries

From: grizzley21
25-Dec-18
\

From: grizzley21
25-Dec-18
compound bowhunters are welcome at PBS. it is not the bow, but the type of person that joins the PBS,

From: Ucsdryder
25-Dec-18
Looks like 95% are trad guys. Is that the average age too? ;)

From: Franklin
25-Dec-18
What exactly is a "Professional Bowhunter"?

From: Glunker
26-Dec-18
PBS is a great organization, with great members. The name might have to go though.

From: Bowriter
26-Dec-18
Been around along time. Been around a long time, mostly trad with a few big names.

From: Bou'bound
26-Dec-18
What the heck ........join .....how can you go wrong for 40 bucks.

From: Preston Lay
26-Dec-18
Professional is in the way you conduct yourself bowhunting, not as in being in the archery business. The membership is two tier and anyone can join as an associate and there is no requirement on the number of animals you have taken. After being an associate member you can apply for regular membership and that requires a detailed application that's reviewed by the elected council. Part of that requires some kills only to confirm that the hunter is experienced. There are many members that prefer to be associates and that is fine, regulars can vote on council members and by law changes. There are many memership hunts available across the country. The quarterly magazine is worth the price of admission. Where else can you get regular articles by Gene & Barry Wensel, The late Roger Rothhaar, Monty Browning, Don Thomas, Ect.... Many here remember the Alaskan adventures posted by Kevin Dill. Kevin is a PBS member and portrays the attitude of the membership, Its the package of preparation, the journey and the hunt. PBS is purely bowhunting at its finest. Plus there is a gathering every two years at different locations around the US. Its a great opportunity to make new friends and plan new trips. The next will be in Springfield, MO in March of 2020.

26-Dec-18
I thought PBS only allowed tradition archers?

From: Preston Lay
26-Dec-18
PBS is not traditional only. Its just so happens that many members are traditional shooters.

From: Buffalo1
26-Dec-18
A well established, long time, reputable organization. Never heard a negative comment about them.

26-Dec-18
I think its a fine group, I did attend their spring get together in Madison Wis this year, and enjoyed it... However, I shoot both long bow, for early season deer, the compound for late season, and use the cross bow for turkey,,,,,,, so I do not think, I could join, because you must be honest, with what you hunt with, and I think the xbow for anything is not accepted......

I would like to read their magazine though, lots of good writers in it...... thanks for the replies,,, the guys I met there were all top notch,,,,,,,,,,,,,

From: arlone
26-Dec-18
Well said Preston Lay!

From: Ken Taylor
26-Dec-18
I was a member for many years, but I assume because I'm from Canada, it felt like I was connected to a "ghost" organization. I received the magazine regularly, which at the time (I don't know about now) was mostly internal functioning and club politics. When I didn't renew, I never heard a peep from them. I think that it's most likely a great organization if you live in the U.S.A.

From: BC173
26-Dec-18
How does a person join? I always thought it was by invitation only. And what is the difference between a Regular member and Associate member?

From: Jaquomo
26-Dec-18
What does the PBS actually do, besides publish a magazine and hold a biennial convention?

From: Ollie
26-Dec-18
If you have questions about PBS, I suggest that you first visit their website and then ask specific questions should you have any (www.professionalbowhunters.org). Anyone can join as an associate member. A few years back PBS initiated a member-hunt program. This consists of a member sponsoring a hunt and coming up with the logistics of where, when, for what, and how many the hunt can support. We have had quite a few whitetail deer hunts in Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia. Elk hunts in Utah. Wild hog hunts in Georgia and Texas. Javelina hunts in New Mexico and Texas. This is a great opportunity to hunt a new area and make some new friends. Many guys want to do hunts like this but don't know where to go or have anyone to go with them on the hunt. Canada - communications with the membership have greatly improved. We have a new home office that is very computer/social media savvy. If you can't make it down to the states for one of our hunts or gatherings please consider sponsoring a hunt in Canada and we'll drive up north to visit and hunt with you!

From: Bowriter
26-Dec-18
"What does the PBS actually do, besides publish a magazine and hold a biennial convention?"

Now there is a great question. Way back...I mean in the first few months they were formed, I thought about joining. I was told by one of the first members, a super good friend, not to bother because I promoted compound bows. I have not one thing against the PBS. In fact, I did not even know they were still around.

From: Jaquomo
26-Dec-18
Thanks, Ollie. I've spent time on the website, which is what prompted my question. Sounds more like a trad version of North American Hunting Club. I didn't know they were still around, either.

Good to see that they aren't overtly anti-modern anymore, although any organization that is admittedly "95% traditional" is bound to have more than a few outspoken bigots. I'd be interested in hearing about the value and inclusiveness of the society from some members who shoot modern equipment, even though I'm 95% traditional. From reading the website, it sounds as if modern bowhunters are only grudgingly accepted.

From: Ollie
26-Dec-18
PBS is about 95% traditional users. At one time it was more like 80%. Some of our members are quite outspoken regarding hunting equipment. This creates problems as these individuals are very vocal and give the mistaken impression that all members feel the same as they do. Any organization will have a few bigots. Look at the infighting that takes place within P&Y over equipment/accessory issues. I really wish that the PBS members that shoot modern equipment would be more visable and show the membership that it is more about attitudes and ethics and less so for the bow in your hand. Give us a try, you may find some of the stuff your read about us online is way off target.

From: Boreal
26-Dec-18
Ollie, Are there any regular members that aren't trad only?

From: Jaquomo
26-Dec-18
Thanks, Ollie. Still trying to figure out what the society actually does, and what value does it offer?

From: JTV
26-Dec-18
pro·fes·sion·al /pr??feSH(?)n(?)l/Submit adjective 1. relating to or connected with a profession. "young professional people" synonyms: white-collar, nonmanual "people in professional occupations" 2. (of a person) engaged in a specified activity as one's main paid occupation rather than as a pastime. "a professional boxer" synonyms: paid, salaried "a professional rugby player" noun 1. a person engaged or qualified in a profession. "professionals such as lawyers and surveyors" synonyms: white-collar worker, office worker "affluent young professionals"

From: Starfire
26-Dec-18
I never really cared much for PBS because the only question they asked on their application was what weight bow you used? I would be more interested in joining a group that asks whether you have been convicted of any game law violation, like my local archery club does.

From: Preston Lay
26-Dec-18
A few more comments. PBS was formed before the compound bow (early 60's) It was formed because, back then organizations were about target archers and the founders wanted a group for bowhunters. That's the reason bow poundage was found on the application. You will notice no bow poundage now. PBS council is made up of unpaid regular members that volunteer to run for the position. These people are usually involved in their respective state organization(s).No group is perfect as we all know. I've been a member for more than 20 years and I have experienced PBS helping states preserve bowhunting seasons. They have always offered assistance and many will attest to this. They have given youth scholarships and hosted youth hunts which provided one on one mentors. I might add some of these youths have became high profile PBS members and it all started when they were kids. PBS members usually are the type of person that eat, sleep and breath bowhunting. No it's not for everyone.

From: Scar Finga
26-Dec-18
Mr. Lay and or Ollie,

I am not being flippant, nor am I bashing the organization in any way. But I am with Jaquomo on this, I am still trying to figure out what they do... It appears to be more of bowhunting club and not a bowhunting organization that fights for and supports bow hunters as a whole.

I got this off the website

"Our Mission

It is the purpose of the Professional Bowhunters Society® to be an organization dedicated to the preservation of bowhunting’s traditional values and to attract members who vow:•That by choice, they have selected bowhunting as their primary archery interest •To share experiences, knowledge and shooting skills •To set a good example and to serve as a role model for youth and others in the hunting fraternity •To abide by game laws and support sound scientific management of our outdoor resource".

I feel that is a great mission statement for a bowhunting club! I just want to make sure I am understanding the big picture and I am not missing something.

Thank You.

Respectfully,

Mark Williams

From: Preston Lay
26-Dec-18
Mark, you are well taken and the comments are appreciated. I don't take anything you stated as bashing. I will try to convey what we do. We provide member only hunts all across the states including Alaska. We provide help ,to state organizations to stop intrusions of air bows and shortening bow hunting seasons. This comes in the way of how to approach legislators and methods such as flooding emails and phone calls, basically rallying the troops of state bowhunting groups. We provide a one of a kind magazine with articles from the membership. We have bi-annual gatherings at neat places that are four day events. Seminars of all kinds from many bowhunters. It's family friendly and my wife (non-hunter) greatly has enjoyed several she attended. We provide knowledge from experience to up and coming bowhunters, shooting, arrow building, how to advice such as planning a Africa or Alaskan adventure,ect. Through the gatherings and member hunts many solid forever friendships are forged. I think Kevin Dill had said his Alaskan adventures stated with PBS and he has inspired many of us to plan our own trips. Many years ago I was inspired by Gene, Barry Wensel, Roger Rothhaar, Paul Brunner, Fred Asbell, Don Thomas, Dick Robertson, Jay Massey and many more. These were the pioneers when archery was not respected as a efficient hunting weapon. These people felt the need to get organized and share ideas, lend a helping hand from around the country. Although they lived miles apart they all share the love of bowhunting and want to see doing things the hard way preserved. We happen to call it a organization because it's not local, we have members from Canada and over seas. Above all I think we are a group of like minded bowhunters that share a passion. I hope this helps

From: ryanrc
26-Dec-18
I know multiple people who are part of a chapter in Illinois. All are anti-compound. The way it was explained to me was that no one would ever "sponsor " someone who hunted with a compound.....so it is a fair question to ask how many regular members are compound hunters.

I don't care one way or the other personally, but it is what it is.

From: Scar Finga
26-Dec-18
Mr. Lay,

Thank you for your detailed and honest answer.

Have a wonderful day sir!

From: steff
26-Dec-18
Have been a member ( and still am) since '85.Have always been a compound guy. Applied once for regular membership. My app was like 18 -19 pages. Didn't make it. Won't try again.Still support the 'club', as it is another 'voice' for us out there .

From: Bou'bound
26-Dec-18
Is pope and young a club or an organization

From: Preston Lay
26-Dec-18
I might add that I'm not the PBS spokesman....I just happened to be viewing threads and came across this one and added my two cents from a members perspective. We have way more qualified members than I, to send out our message.

From: Jaquomo
26-Dec-18
I think it would be good for PBS to articulate and promote a positive message if it intends to survive and grow. Until this thread, my perception of PBS was of a bunch of grumpy old elitist trad snobs flying a self-congratulatory "professional" banner because they have chosen trad bows for hunting, which then gives them a like-minded audience to complain about compounds and whatever else they consider as unfair "technology" that doesn't fit their world view.

I'm sure I'm not the only one with this perception. BTW, I'm no newcomer to bowhunting or trad. Started shooting trad bows 55 years ago, have been bowhunting big game 47 years. So I didn't just fall off a beet truck in front of a bow shop.

From: Spookinelk
26-Dec-18
I've met a few PBS members over the years, all I encountered were accomplished hunters and quality people .

The values they seem to be promoting sound like Pope and Young before standards were liberalized to allow almost anything.....

From: Pat Lefemine
26-Dec-18
I was an associate member for years then I applied for regular membership, was sponsored and accepted. Stayed in the PBS a few years but drifted away and let my membership lapse.

The best way to describe the PBS is a fraternal organization of guys who live and breath bowhunting. It is very much controlled by traditional bowhunters but if you're an ethical and responsible compound guy have a home there too. I have nothing bad to say about them. Yes, there are a few guys who I describe as the 'Traditional Taliban,' but they are the exception - not the rule.

From: Kurt
26-Dec-18
I was an associate member for a few years and a compound shooter. I finally let my membership lapse....don’t really remember why as that was about 30 years ago. I did win a nice custom recurve in the photo contest at the Grand Junction, CO PBS banquet back then.

26-Dec-18
I went to the 1996 gathering (I think it was in Charlotte). The Woman’s NCAA basketball tournament players were staying at the same hotel. What a culture shock for the college age, 6 foot 5 inch woman athletes riding up and down the elevators with some ole guys carrying stick bows.

From: EIStone
26-Dec-18
Yes they are open to the compound shooter for their dues money, but you won't see any stories or advertising in the magazine that has anything to do with compounds or any pictures of compound shooters unless they are well known celebrities. Was a member for years.

From: Altizer
26-Dec-18
PBS is a great organization that supports bowhunting both on a state and national level. Earlier this year they provided ongoing correspondence from numerous members while we were battling the legalization of the “Arrow guns” here in Tennessee. They provided contact information for each of the Wildlife Commisioners as well as proposed legislation. I was heavily involved The commission received numerous correspondence from various members including Barry and Gene Wensel. The “Arrow Gun” was legalized for disabled veterans certified thru the VA but was not legalized across the board. The commission advised this would be limited only to the vets with no future plans to expand the usage. We reminded them was the same thing we were told when the crossbows were legalized. PBS continues to attempt to keep their members abreast of upcoming legislative actions which will not only impact bowhunting but hunting at large. They encourage involvement of their members. True many of us are traditional archers, but we support bowhunting. Bottom line is they are not setting on the couch complaining about us losing privileges, they are out there fighting for everyone one of us that love bowhunting. If we want to keep hunting everyone of us need to do our part to assure bowhunting’s future. Whether it is teaching a kid, talking to state legislators, or providing financial support to those that are fighting the legal battles, we all need to do our part. PBS is doing all the above.

From: Jaquomo
26-Dec-18
Altizer, that's what I wanted to hear. Sounds like our Colorado Bowhunters Association, except on a broader scale. How many associate and regular members do you have now?

From: Altizer
26-Dec-18
Jaquomo, I don’t know the numbers. I’m ashamed to say that I joined way to late. I watched them for years and knew of the impacts that members have made over the years like Gene, Barry, and Roger R. The truth is I joined to do my part in preserving bowhunting. I joined to assure my little boy has the opportunities I’ve had for the last 50 years. PBS, as well as many other organizations, are activily working for the next generation.

From: Kevin Dill
26-Dec-18
There’s been a longstanding (and not unwarranted) rumor that PBS is trad-exclusive or at least compound-negative. The truth is that PBS is neither of these in terms of its bylaws or policies. However, there are individuals who have those tendencies and they are free to express them....but we members all know that an individual’s views don’t represent the organization as a whole. PBS has been known to have some pretty radical trad people with sharp tongues and unfortunately that behavior gets associated with the overall membership. NOT TRUE, as a majority of members are live-and-let-hunt kinds of guys. It pains me when people see the negative rhetoric and interpret it to be PBS speaking....and then they avoid the organization. It’s a small organization of dedicated hunters and can ill afford to have its waterhole poisoned by divisive rhetoric.

.

Remarkably, PBS is one reason I completely endorse the inclusion of compound-shooting hunters. I learned decades ago that a dedicated bow hunter is just that, and he belongs in PBS if he so wishes....wheels or stick...so long as the bow is his primary weapon of interest and use. To quash another rumor: PBS doesn’t care AT ALL if you choose to also use a shotgun, rifle, BB gun, blow darts, atlatl or whatever else is legal. I know a number of members who are excellent hunters and DO use some of the above weapons. I’ve got no problem shotgunning turkeys or squirrels; predator hunting with a long-range rifle; whatever the heck I want. I made that extremely clear decades ago when I applied for Regular membership and the society had no issues with it. There might be individuals who scorn that, but it matters nothing to me.

PBS has a perception issue for sure. I think it has more than its share of misunderstanding and confusion. The term Professional is a good example, as there is nothing about PBS which caters to bowhunting professionals, or otherwise favors them. To me, we are brothers. We bowhunt. We may quarrel occasionally. Those who would divide us for our differences are entitled to that thought. I just want people to know that PBS doesn’t have a divisive policy or agenda. If you’re a hardcore bowhunter you won’t get snubbed by this guy, or by PBS.

From: keepemsharp
27-Dec-18
We would sure have liked some support from PBS when we were battling the crossguns here but don't think they ever showed interest.

27-Dec-18
Sounds like PBS has no issue with scoped crossbows, is that true?

27-Dec-18
Altizer and Dill - thanks for the posts,,,,,,,,,,,,

27-Dec-18
PBS fought the crossbows acceptance from the beginning. Back when it wasn't a concern because it couldn't happen.

From: PECO
27-Dec-18
So, the club lets a a few hard core trad bullies ruin the reputation of the entire group?

27-Dec-18
How many current members do they have, are they growing?

From: JusPassin
27-Dec-18
I joined years back, and donated a number of custom gear, arrows, etc. for the gathering raffle. Never so much as a thank you from anyone. That did it for me.

27-Dec-18
Hard core bullies, what does that mean? Who are they, and are they still there?

27-Dec-18
I have been a long time member and started out as a compound shooter, than changed to recurves, longbows and selfbows for a greater challenge. Somebody mentioned that you'll never see a story or pic in the magazine or website or FB page of a compound kill - not true! My son (an associate member) and I attended a Membership hunt for deer in SD this fall and he killed a nice mulie buck with his compound. I posted that pic on the web site and FB page, and my son has submitted a sort for the magazine with the buck and his compound - not a single negative comment yet!

Don't know the current member numbers but we are growing, after several recent membership drives and structural improvements to the organization.

From: harmonypbs
27-Dec-18

27-Dec-18
Sounds like good growth, especially in the face of declining overall hunter numbers and the loss of bow hunters to become scoped crossbow hunters. Keep up the good work.

From: cnelk
27-Dec-18
I just looked up PBS on FB and perused thru all the photos posted.

Not one compound pic in the bunch

'Perception is Reality' is the first thing that comes to mind

From: Hookedspur
27-Dec-18
I read a lot of the posts and I don't think that I can add to much more than what Kevin, Preston and Olle posted earlier. I will however post what it means to me to be a member. Ive been bowhunting for close to 40 years starting out with a compound, then picking up a recurve in 1990. I hunted with both until I totally gave up the compound about 10 or 12 years ago. I have nothing against the compound, I just enjoyed hunting with my recurve more and didn't want to drop the money on a new compound that was going to be obsolete in three years.

I joined the PBS in the late 90s early 2000s. I let my membership lapse until I renewed in '11 or '12 and became a regular member in '14. I've made some great friends and gone on some unbelievable hunts that I would have never been able to do otherwise. I have a two week DIY Alaska moose hunt with a fellow PBS member set up for this September. At one time they were a force in bowhunting rights and hopefully with a growing membership we will have a voice again.

27-Dec-18
I think there is a lot misunderstood about the PBS and its members. Most are indeed getting "long in the tooth". Just Gene and Barry alone account for almost 120 years of big game bowhunting experience between them. As a "whipper snapper" with only 43 big game seasons under my belt I am starting to realize I have some well established opinions as to what works for me and what does not. On another forum I recently posted and opinion that I had developed over 30 years of trial and error. The entire group turned on me and one fellow who was younger than my youngest daughter called me "a troll and a whineass". If one came to a gathering with an open mind they would find the members to be lifelong friends you just have not met yet. The collective experience of the group creates an opportunity to learn things exponentially greater than any other forum. Most of the most experienced members no longer post anywhere online because of the type of backlash in the above example. Does the PBS have warts? Yes, as does any group of people. And to go with the massive levels experience comes folks pretty set in their ways and opinions. But, with any group of old folks at the nursing home, if you can get past the front door and odor, you will find a national treasure of knowledge and understanding. I for one, am a member because any get together is full of people who share an intense passion and joy of life. If you are serious bowhunter and you sat down for a spell and talked with these folks, you will find your life enriched and you will look forward to the next gathering. Under current leadership the PBS has sought and brought in many new, next generation hunters, that are very serious and bring a lot of knowledge in their own right. Councilman Ethan Rodriguez is kind of the face getting involved in the new fangled "podcast" thing (I still do not know where to find those things) . For anyone who is serious about bow hunting, I recommend they stop at a PBS booth at a shoot, and just talk bow hunting. You may find 1000 new lifelong friends you have not met yet.

From: Boreal
27-Dec-18
So, are there any regular members that aren't trad only?

27-Dec-18
cnelk, you make a good point. The vast majority of PBSers (including me) are trad hunters, so most stories, pics, posts, etc will show that perspective. But as others have pointed out, we are not "anti-compound bow".

I am positive that I posted pics of my son's compound SD mulie (and OH whitetail) on PBS's FB page, and the website too for at least the mulie buck.

From: PECO
27-Dec-18
Missouribreaks, to answer your question about who the bullies are, here is one example of what I am talking about. "V\PBS has been known to have some pretty radical trad people with sharp tongues and unfortunately that behavior gets associated with the overall membership." There are many more examples in this thread. My point, and I think you got it, is that the club lets a few people ruin it's reputation.

From: Ollie
27-Dec-18
We do have some members that shoot compound bows. M. R. James is a life member who joined shortly after PBS was formed in the 1960's. Until he sold Bowhunter magazine, MR was very supportive of PBS give us a free full page of advertising in each issue of the magazine. Dave Samuel was a long time member and was elected as a councilman back in the 1970's. There have been others like Jim Daughtery, Russell Hull, Dick Sage. Some of these guys drifted away from PBS for one reason or another. Starfire, we voted out the minimum bow weight requirements two years ago. We recognized that rule was outdated and that bow weight alone was not a good predictor for the effectiveness of a bow to kill a certain animal. Steff, please give it another try. Councils and attitudes change. The atmosphere today is much more positive for members that shoot compounds than it was 5-10 years ago. We are trying but we need your help. EIStone, you commented on the lack of stories and pictures in our magazine from members shooting compound bows. How many stories/pictures did you submit as a member? We can't print stories or pictures that do not get submitted. Justpassin, no excuse for you not receiving appropriate recognition for your generous donation. We are doing better not to let stuff like this fall through the cracks. With the exception of our home office, all positions are on a volunteer basis so sometimes things get overlooked that should not. Members like myself and Kevin Dill are pushing back against the "trad bullies". The organization is finally realizing the damage that some of these people have caused. Many of the biggest offenders have quit or are no longer active in the organization. Bullying is no longer permitted on our website. Offenders have their accounts closed.

PBS believes that bowhunting is supposed to be difficult and challenging. We embrace those challenges, although we do not all agree where lines should be drawn. We want to show other bowhunters the joy we find in embracing those challenges.

PBS is first and foremost, a fraternal organization where ethical bowhunters can gather for fellowship. We were not formed to be the NRA for bowhunters. Some people mistakenly thinking that is or should be our primary role. We do get involved in bowhunting related issues from time to time. PBS led the fight to opposed drugged arrows (pods) in the 1960-1970's. PBS led the fight to keep crossbows out of archery only hunting seasons. We began this back in the early 1980's. We funded the Marlow study that refuted many of the claims of the crossbow lobby. Yes, the fight has now been lost but most of you fellows would have been seeing crossbows in your local woods 20+ years ago if not for the efforts of the PBS.

From: Whip
27-Dec-18
It has pretty much all been said by other PBS members above, so I won't try to rehash their opinions. But they do hit the nail on the head.

I have been a PBS member along with a variety of other groups both national and state. PBS is far and away my favorite organization. I consider myself pretty passionate about my bowhunting, and PBS members tend to be just like me. I've not met a finer group of people anywhere. I have made friends all over the country and shared hunting camps with many of them in places that I would have never have seen otherwise. When I am looking at new places to hunt and asking for information PBS friends and members are always there with advice and detailed information that I don't think I would get anywhere else.

Yes, the vast majority of PBS members tend to be trad shooters. That being said, my most frequent hunting partner shoots a compound and is also a PBS member. Makes no difference at all to me - he is one of the best and most ethical hunters I know. Some other people might prefer to hunt only with other trad shooters and I guess that is their choice. But they are missing out on some good people in my opinion.

As has been said, PBS is not for everyone, and does not pretend to try to be. If you are a serious ethical bowhunter and want to meet more people like yourself you won't find a better place to do it. In making your decision I would encourage you to take the word of people that are currently members. Someone's opinion that has never belonged or that hasn't been a member for 30 years really can't tell you much about the organization today.

27-Dec-18
I am the current Vice-President of PBS and can't add much more than some of the guys above said so well. As any group of hard-core bowhunters, we have guys with strong opinions. We have guys who bait bears and guys who think baiting bears is unethical, guys who lion hunt over dogs, and guys who think that is unethical, guys who are pro-trial camera and against. We are a club if individuals so you get a big variety. Are their anti-compound guys in PBS? Sure, but the vast majority are not anti-compound, but it is true that we are 97% made up of traditional guys. And it is the love of close range, woodsmanship-based bowhunting that bonds us all together. The plain truth is that a super modern bowhunter who wants the ability to shoot animals at 100 yards and uses every bit of the most modern technology to solve his hunting challenges will not find much in common with our membership - that is not elitism talking, it is simply the personality of our organization. A modern bowhunter who relies on woodsmanship, patience, and experience to get close to animals might well enjoy it. We do cater to traditional guys because they make up most of our organization and most of us love it so much we try to promote it as much as we can. Many of us, myself included, regularly hunt with modern bowhunters. What we do: We have the Bi-enniel Gathering, and several Odd-Year Gatherings, we put on numerous membership hunts, send out email blasts on club and political issues, have a great magazine and website, and offer a serious bowhunter a chance to network with a lot of experienced guys. For me, the best part has always been the friends I have made. I have hunted all over the world with guys I met through PBS. Are we perfect? No, but what organization is? We strive to be a positive organization that is for things, not against things (except crossbows and Airbows..lol), and we are doing well now, growing and attracting younger bowhunters too.

From: Ambush
27-Dec-18
I wonder what this thread would look like on the Leather Wall?

I have no problem with private clubs/orgs that are exclusive to people or actions that are contrary to that clubs purpose. It's all too common now for people to go looking for something to be offended by and then make a stink about it. If my local fly tying club has an open evening, I certainly would not expect to have my gang troll accepted into the mix. P&Y doesn't accept crossbows and actively fights against them and that's cheered.

Personally, I just wouldn't try to join a club that wasn't substantially aligned with my believes. And I certainly wouldn't seek one out and join to try and change it. And as far as "gruff, opinionated" members; well you don't have to join PBS to find those.

Keep in mind that PBS, as an org, didn't come on BS recruiting and promoting. They were dragged here by a none member's initial post and the ensuing discussion.

Any club that becomes irrelevant will slowly die. If staying the same keeps you relevant, then that's the course to take. If it's change, then so be it, but expect resistance in either case.

27-Dec-18
I have enjoyed this thread, all the best to the PBS.

27-Dec-18
I was a PBS member back in the 80’s when I was young, I let my membership lapse and was unaware that they were still around until I went on a elk hunt back in 2010. My hunting partner was a member so I rejoined. I am an associate member and I hunt with longbows ranging from 42 to 58 lbs depending on the animal I am hunting. I have met many Bowhunters through the PBS and had the opportunity to hunt several different places through the organization. Jeff And I host the GA hog hunt. Another PBS and myself went to Alaska together after meeting through another PBS members and several PBS members helped with logistics. All my bow hunting friends are PBS members and I look forward to new adventures so that sums it up to what the PBS is for me.

From: JulianT
27-Dec-18
As an associate member with too much of an opinion on the way of things sometimes, I can say that on paper, the PBS is probably not for me either. However, I made the mistake of attending a gathering about 10 years ago and my life has been nothing but further enriched because of it. I've come to realize over the years that many of the details of the organization are a product of time and place. Not everything is personal, judgmental or meant to create division. Though changing times do have a way of changing good intentions into poor optics. For many of us, the journey of an adventurous bow hunting life is the only thing that doesn't rise to the importance of family, faith or friendships. It's hard to comprehend the fraternal bonds you develop with guys and gals who share in that journey until you get to know them, authentically. The PBS picks up where the printed word lets off. It's pretty low risk to give it a whirl. If it doesn't feel like family, you won't need anyone else's confirmation to realize it. Just be careful what you get yourself into, though. You might end up hunting with your heroes.

From: Jaquomo
27-Dec-18
Agree, and thanks to the PBS folks who posted on here. It sounds like a nice little fraternity.

Personally, I don't see anything offered by PBS I don't already get from other organizations to which I belong and, frankly, from the Bowsite. Legislative updates, annual and biennial gatherings, tremendous collective knowledge base of successful ethical bowhunters, "members" willing to help, "member" hunts, fellowship with like-minded new friends, etc..., along with some judgmentalism, ethics policing, and even anti-compound/trail cam/technology with the click of an icon.

But I do wish you luck, and hope you can continue to grow.

From: midwest
27-Dec-18
Well done, PBS members!

From: PA-R
27-Dec-18
X-2 Midwest.

From: NY Bowman
27-Dec-18
I too have been a PBS member for many years. Thank you to Kevin, Preston, Jeff, Joe, Matt, John, Julian, Sean, and the many others who have taken the time to help others understand what PBS is about. Like Julian stated, it's not about the tangibles. It's the intangibles the PBS offers that make it a wonderful organization. The intangibles don't arrive in a manila envelope in the mail. They grow over time. I know without hesitation that if I were in need there would be dozens of PBS guys stepping up to offer help. It's just the kind of people who call PBS home. Like any big family there are squabbles and almost all families have a "Cousin Eddie", but it's still family. The PBS has helped me develop into a better bowhunter by sharing camps with some of the most accomplished bowhunters in the world. Being an accomplished bowhunter has absolutely nothing to do with how many inches of bone you have on the wall. My kids have benefitted by attending Youth Hunts and receiving college scholarships. PBS helps recruit young hunters into the sport in many ways. Most of it happens without much fanfare. I can't even begin to guess how many bows or other equipment have been provided. I know I was able to provide many bows to Church youth camps thanks to PBS and Nick Dedaker of Compton.

Most of my best friends are because of PBS.

If you are only interested in what you get from PBS instead of what you have to offer, then it likely isn't a place for you.

I too invite you to attend a gathering, go on a membership hunt, or just join for the magazine. If you love the hunt and not just the kill, I bet you'll find more friends than you can imagine.

Thank you PBS!

From: Whip
27-Dec-18
It seems that one of my comments above might have not been the best choice of words. I said that PBS is not for everyone. It was pointed out to me that might come off as condescending or dismissive. I am sorry if it was taken that way, and not at all what I meant. To me it simply means that PBS is by its very definition an organization that was not set up to appeal to the masses. It tends to attract those for which bowhunting has become a huge part of who they are - more of a lifestyle than a hobby. That kind of defines me, and I enjoy getting to know, hanging around, and sharing trips with people that share my passion as deeply as I do.

No, PBS is not for everyone. But that doesn't mean that there are many many excellent people who don't join for one reason or another. I also believe that there are certainly a bunch of people who would really enjoy being a part of PBS but just have not been exposed to it or don't know enough about it. If you think it might appeal to you, give it a try.

One thing I do personally believe is that all bowhunters should find some hunting related organization that they can support. There are plenty to chose from, and no way can we all belong to each of them. Choose those that align closest to your own personal beliefs and at least support a couple with a membership whether you intend to become active in it or not. Our voices carry more weight with numbers, and every organization could use more of you. And no matter who you choose to support, keep in mind that they will never represent your own opinions 100% of the time. If you only would join an organization that always agrees with you 100% of the time you will probably end up with a membership of one. ;0)

From: Bou'bound
27-Dec-18
Come on guys for the price of two bottles of doe pee you can test drive them for a year

27-Dec-18
I was an associate member for many years. I let it lapse when it was clear to me that I wasn't able to give more of my time to help the organization and others. PBS is a great organization with many dedicated bowhunters. It's a fantastic place to meet like-minded bowhunters and to learn but, to me, it isn't a one-sided relationship. It's not just about what I could get from the organization, it was more what could I offer the organization and, by extension, other bowhunters. I met a lot of great guys that are PBS members that are totally unselfish with their time. That is the strength of the organization.

From: ryanrc
27-Dec-18
I can't imagine why people mistakenly think the PBS is traditional only.......

PROFESSIONAL BOWHUNTERS SOCIETY

ABOUT US

THE PROFESSIONAL BOWHUNTERS SOCIETY — WHO ARE WE?

?There is no feeling on earth like using your skill to work ten yards from a big game animal, then picking a spot, drawing back a simple longbow and sending a successful arrow on its way. Our members live for that feeling, and recognize that the satisfaction in a successful hunt is directly related to the effort put forth. For more than fifty years, the members of the Professional Bowhunters Society have been dedicated to the protection and promotion of bowhunting’s traditional values as a sport where success is based on skill, woodsmanship, and patience. Our members are passionate bowhunters who spend a tremendous amount of their time roaming wild places with a simple stick and string. Our motto is KNOWLEDGE THROUGH EXPERIENCE. Why? Because we don’t look to technology to solve all of our bowhunting challenges - we strive to become better, more knowledgeable bowhunters. The Professional Bowhunters Society is not for all everyone. We attract those who live to hunt with a simple bow and arrow, not the casual bowhunter or the foam puncher who hunts a couple of weekends a year. Most of our members, 95% of whom shoot traditional equipment, tend to be the movers and shakers who are involved in their state bowhunting organization, in youth and church archery programs, and support other mentoring activities because in this day and age many folks never get exposed to the concepts we believe in - short-range bowhunting based on skill and woodsmanship. And we mentor each other too. If a southern member wants to increase his knowledge about elk for an upcoming trip, he has a network of experienced members who will be happy to help. PBS is a big family, we hunt together all over the country, share our experiences, and sometimes even fight a little like all passionate folks. Our members are our most valuable asset.

 Should you join the PBS family?  

?If you are a dedicated traditional bowhunter, or want to learn about a simpler, more satisfying way to hunt, there is no better resource than the PBS.    We have an outstanding magazine with articles by some of the biggest names in the traditional bowhunting community, a Biennial Gathering featuring speakers and seminars (see link for information, and numerous Regional Membership Hunts offering a great chance to not only chase critters, but to make some new friends.    And finally, the best reason to join is simply to get to know and network with some of the best, most knowledgeable people in bowhunting.              ??

OUR MISSION

It is the purpose of the Professional Bowhunters Society® to be an organization dedicated to the preservation of bowhunting’s traditional values and to attract members who vow:That by choice, they have selected bowhunting as their primary archery interestTo share experiences, knowledge and shooting skillsTo set a good example and to serve as a role model for youth and others in the hunting fraternityTo abide by game laws and support sound scientific management of our outdoor resources

BECOME A ?PBS MEMBER

JOIN NOW

RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP

RENEW MEMBERSHIP

Professional Bowhunters Society P.O. Box 22631 Indianapolis, IN 46222 Phone 801-888-3802

HOMEABOUT US CONTACT US GATHERINGSREGIONAL MEMBER HUNTSJOIN PBSQUALIFIED REGULAR MEMBERPOLITICAL ACTIONMEMBERSHIP DRIVEPBS GEARPBS FORUMPODCASTSSTICKBOW CHRONICLES PODCAST2019 PBS ONLINE AUCTION

From: Jon Simoneau
27-Dec-18
I’ve been an associate member for many years now. Believe it or not, I’m 40 years old and am one of the younger members. This surprises me as there is a major resurgence of traditional bowhunting happening right now that rivals that of the 1990s. We’ve got some opinionated members. So does the bowsite. Why be a member of the P.B.S.? Well I can tell you why I joined. I joined because when I was younger I wanted to have access to some hardcore bowhunters who could teach me a lot along the way. Guys who had been bowhunting for longer than I was alive. The membership hunts are a great thing. Last year I hunted on Kodiak Island with some of the guys who have already posted above. If I am looking for information about a particular hunt or area to hunt will get excellent information from a P.B.S. guy who has been there and done that, if not an actual invitation for a hunt. We certainly are not a large organization, but I think we are a good one.

From: Brotsky
27-Dec-18
Very impressed that the membership took so much time to comment on this thread answering so many questions. Speaks a lot about the organization to me. I don't personally see myself aligning with some of the comments/values above but overall very impressed with the membership's dedication and how much they care about the club! Well done gentlemen!

From: SJR Bows
27-Dec-18

SJR Bows's Link
I joined in 2010 and can no imagine not being a member and being involved with so many great bowhunters and just great people, We regularly get email blasts now of area that have political issues and challanges to hunting seasons so we are informed and can contact the state of concern. If you are into podcasts listen to this one with Norm Johnson the current President of the PBS as he explains many of the questions you have asked about .

https://tradquest.blubrry.com/2017/07/21/norm-johnson-episode-009/

From: Single bevel
27-Dec-18
Been an associate member for many years. I'd like to be a regular but I haven't applied. Its a fine organization. I put them in my will. I hope to give back to bowhunting even from the grave.

From: Ucsdryder
27-Dec-18
Single bevel, welcome to bowsite. Feel free to give back by including us too!

From: Whip
27-Dec-18
ryanrc - Thanks for looking at that. Somebody actually reads our website! I agree with you that the wording is less than welcoming to compound hunters. I'm not on council, so really don't know the answer. Maybe it needs to be looked at and refreshed. I keep in mind that the organization is run by volunteers, and sometimes the wheels turn slower than we like.

That being said, it really isn't all that far from the truth. We've been very open about the fact that the vast majority of members shoot traditional gear. That doesn't say that compounds aren't welcome - just is what it is. Most of us would love to have more ethical compound hunters join us. They would get a chance to be introduced to traditional gear, and the crusty old guys that would like all bows to be sticks and strings would get a chance to see that the weapon doesn't define the hunter that carries it. There are plenty of extremely hard working dedicated compound shooters that "get it" and would be a great compliment to our ranks. It is what goes on between his or her ears is what sets us apart.

Tradition is about more than equipment. It is learning to be a better hunter, becoming intimately familiar with our quarry. Seeing how close we can get, not how far we can shoot. Longbows and recurves lend themselves perfectly to that philosophy. While many of us, myself included, have gone on guided hunts, for most of us DIY hunts in far away places are what fill our dreams. Above all else, ethics and following game laws governs everything we do.

As I think someone else posted earlier, if the latest and greatest gadgets or excelling on the target range are what trips your trigger, you won't find much of that here. But if you are looking for new challenges enjoy meeting people that feel the same way, this could be for you. If not, that's OK too.

From: Kevin Dill
27-Dec-18
I want people to know that a member can put forth any views or opinions they wish. PBS isn't in the business of censoring its members. If someone thinks a few members disparaging something they dislike is an overall representation of PBS, that's simply not true.

From: Altizer
27-Dec-18

Altizer's embedded Photo
Altizer's embedded Photo
Here is another positive. This is a great publication.

From: Hookedspur
27-Dec-18
Yes Alan that is a great part of the PBS. And it's the membership who writes it. Anyone can submit an article.

From: EIStone
27-Dec-18
Ollie, I never submitted any stories but I have never written a story either, but I did submit photo's to Jack when it was advertised in the magazine that photos were needed for the members photo page and never saw one in the magazine. I noted below someone posted a cover of one of the magazines, I'll tell you what I'll do, you show me one cover that has a guy with a compound and an animal on the cover and I'll rejoin. Surely there has been one good quality photo in the 40+ yrs. since PBS excepted the compound bow into their ranks. Guys they are all smoke and mirrors, they want your dues money to help stay solvent but if you shoot a compound they don't want your equipment. And to show that this is not a grudge on my part, two of my best friends are members, one a life member and the other is presently running for V.P. I believe and we have talked about this very thing many times, Dale

From: stagetek
27-Dec-18
It's a great organization, and I am proud to be a member of it. I would say more, but it has already been very well explained.

From: Myke
28-Dec-18
I have been an Associate PBS member since 2010. I have met many good friends from states all over this country through this organization. I joined this organization because I wanted to expand my hunting opportunities beyond my states borders. And it is hard to find many national bowhunting organizations where members are willing to sponsor hunts on their home turf, but this organization fit that bill. (In fact, it's hard to find many national bowhunting organizations at all beyond the Pope & Young club.) I would rather actually experience a hunt, than read about it. So how does one go about learning the ropes of how to hunt Texas, or Utah, or Colorado, or Nebraska or Georgia or Virginia, etc; learn to hunt their terrain, and their animal species and learn different hunting tactics? To get a quality hunt from a like minded bowhunter without the hand holding and expense of a guide and outfitter? I found many quality opportunities within the PBS. I have been on 10 PBS hunts since 2010, sometimes more than one per year. None have been disappointments and I have learned much as a bowhunter. You can't beat boots on the ground experience. Even going on one of these hunts would be worth the price of the membership.

As far as the accusations of elitism, none of those hunts were traditional only hunts. None of the banquets have been traditional only events. Compound shooters were not excluded, nor banned, nor chastised. I as a new member was never refused if an open spot was available on a hunt. I commit, I go; they commit, it happens. Hunts were well organized, opportunities for animals were present. My fellow hunters were respectful and reliable. That has been my experience since 2010. I too have sponsored a WI hunt, and have assisted with other hunts. Did everything go perfectly? No - for if man could plan everything out perfectly, there would be no such thing as adventure. But adventure opportunities exist in the real world, not on your couch. The sponsored hunts are only one aspect of the PBS. What you put into it affects what you get out of it. But opportunity can be found here. Join, inquire, commit, hunt.

From: Photoman
28-Dec-18

Photoman's embedded Photo
Photoman's embedded Photo
Dale and anyone else interested. If you know someone that has all of the PBS Magazines do yourself a favor and see if they will let you borrow them. The reading is excellent and despite what I lot of you are saying without having the all of the facts, there has been compound bows on the cover as well as adds and stories in the magazine with compounds. I know because I took the cover photo attached and the guy in the picture is a friend and PBS member and he was using a compound on this elk hunt. I don't hunt with him because of what he does or does not hunt with, I hunt with him because HE IS THE PBS.

From: Photoman
28-Dec-18

Photoman's embedded Photo
Photoman's embedded Photo
Here is the full cover:

28-Dec-18
Well said Myke, well said.

Many of the comments of non members certainly provides an opportunity for introspection. And that is probably long overdue and an opportunity for improvement. When thinking about how the PBS got this reputation, The name that keeps popping into my head is Jay Massey. For those who have never heard of him, do a google search as I cannot begin to do his story justice. IMHO Jay was one of if not THE most influential person on the thinking and positions of the PBS in the 80s and early 90s, and the perceptions of non members to this day. He was VERY opinionated and his writings were the very definition of the traditional archery bigot. He was the most extreme of extreme. For those who were serious bowhunters in the 80s his words resonated strongly with many, many people. He died from cancer in 94 I believe, yet his works and positions live on. Many of those who most fervently followed his doctrine have left for Comptons and BHA, or passed to the great hunting grounds. The ironic thing about his work, is how similar it is to the positions now held by so many serious compound bowhunters with regard to inclusion of xbows into general archery seasons. And these people came to these positions in an identical manner as Jay Massey in the development of his positions. I would imagine the serious Xbow shooter probably is thinking the same thing about the very serious compound bowhunters as the very serious compound hunters who are not members of PBS feel about PBS. Perhaps the PBS can play a central role is resolving the issues that divide us, while at the same time define and preserve bowhunting and its uniqueness. This may be the only way to stop the now inevitable loss of most separate bow-only seasons. I say come and Join the PBS, to improve your experiences, and to preserve what makes bowhunting special for future generations.

From: Photoman
28-Dec-18
So Dale I just looked though the issues I had out and located this issue with a compound and an animal. No elk were killed on this trip, but we sure did have a great time. I did take the picture of the elk in the inset on that trip.

I am currently the Senior Councilman and I can say without hesitation that PBS is an awesome Organization. Like any Organization or Club you will get out of it what you put into it. If you just pay your dues and read the magazine, it may seem like you are not getting your monies worth, but get involved, submit articles and photos, attend a Member Hunt, attend a Gathering and most of all meet and make some new friends and I will promise you that you will see the value of your membership and it won't be in dollars and cents. I joined in 1999 when I was hunting with a compound bow and have been a member since. My membership has been priceless and I know for a fact that had it not been for PBS I would not have been on many of the hunts that I have been fortunate enough to go on. I have life long friends that I now visit who live out of state thanks to the cost of my dues over the years. I can go on and on about how great PBS is, but in order to understand you not just join, but get involved. What has been said above from some of our members should give anyone thinking about joining enough encouragement to give PBS a try. I need to run, a good buddy and PBS member from Utah will be landing at the airport in an hour and we have some unfinished business chasing Virginia whitetails. :-)

If anyone has questions about PBS don't hesitate to contact a member directly and talk to them.

28-Dec-18
Great information. Other than the position and acceptance of compound bows by the PBS, what are the differences in the experience of the PBS vs Comptons. I ask because many will choose to be participants in only one organization.

From: midwest
28-Dec-18
Oh, sure, one token compound cover photo and it's mostly covered up. :):):):):)

I think they're probably a great organization. Personally, I wouldn't join unless I was shooting a stick bow again. I would feel like a leper showing up to one of their gatherings toting wheels.

28-Dec-18
Missouri, the personality of the two organizations is quite a bit different, but not in any negative way. Compton was borne after an attempt was made years ago to make PBS all traditional and the vote failed. Quite a few members left and started Compton. I am way more involved in PBS, but am a Charter Life Member of Compton too. Both do a lot of good and we share a lot of members. I will speak about PBS because I am not directly involved enough in Compton and don't want to say something that may not be correct. PBS tends to attract guys who live to bowhunt, travel to bowhunt, and to whom bowhunting is a huge part of their identity. I know that if I want to go hunt some place that i have never been, I can contact a PBS member and there is an extremely high chance that I will get dead-on advice from an experienced bowhunter. That is not to say a lot of Compton guys are not just as dedicated or experienced - like I said, we share a lot of members, and I hope both organizations do well in the future. Only good can come from that.

28-Dec-18
Thank you, great information.

From: Robear
28-Dec-18
I was a PBS Regular. I was a die hard traditional bowhunter for 13 years. Went to 3 gatherings and heard Pat give a speech at one of them about this whole internet thing! Been a while ago. Eventually, I wasn't comfortable hunting with traditional equipment any longer and went to a compound. I let my membership lapse. It is a great group of peolple, but the slant is defiantly not toward the compound bow, and I just didn't feel right being a member any longer. Nothing wrong with that, good on em'. I felt the same way at one time.

From: Kevin Dill
28-Dec-18
For those focused on the fact that PBS is mostly comprised of traditional equipment users, there may be little said which matters. Most members are by nature very conservative minded, and tilt away from trends or latest modern equipment styles. It's a preference thing and not an unspoken rule or policy within PBS. I'll be the first to stand and say that nobody who applies and joins PBS will be accorded lesser status for being a compound shooter. I've been a regular member for many years, and I will absolutely hunt with whatever type bow (compound, longbow, recurve) I decide and I assure you the organization isn't going to worry about it. Neither am I. I personally think most of our members are about hunting hard and not worrying what others think of them. I know for sure that's how I operate.

.

I tend to think we don't see many compound users because of two main things. The first is because of past negative behaviors and statements from members who publicly threw shade on compound users, while wrongly claiming to represent the majority view of members. The second is simply because birds of a feather flock together. A prospective member doesn't see lots of compound activity within PBS and therefore doesn't identify with the organization. That's sad to me because I know a lot of great potential members never make it in.

From: GVS
28-Dec-18
Many good points made here by guys that are much more articulate than I am. I absolutely treasure my membership in the PBS. The quality of people is second to none. I tell people, if you want to expand your bowhunting horizons with people that hold ethics and fair chase in the highest regard the PBS is for you.

I joined in the early 90's and was not able to make a gathering until 2000. My wife and I went not quite sure what we would experience. There were a couple people there that we knew but that was it. We left with many more friends and look forward to each contact that we have with them. There is no way I am going to one of them now without my wife. She has so much fun with all of the other ladies.

As for the equipment thing. I was just getting back into the trad world when I joined and never let that be a consideration. PBS is about hardcore ethical bowhunting. If bowhunting is your hobby I doubt it would be a fit, but if bowhunting is your lifestyle the PBS is where you will find like minded people.

From: Ambush
28-Dec-18
"....simply because birds of a feather flock together..."

And that, folks, is why we have clubs of various cultures. It's not only ok, it's good. You sometimes you may see a variety of different birds in the same feeder because of the commonality of the food, but they typically only roost with their own kind. I can't see any issue with that.

From: skipmaster1
28-Dec-18
I shoot both modern and traditional. I’ve never met a better group of folks than those at PBS. Lots of opportunity to get together for different hunts and great ambassadors for Bowhunting. It’s not for everyone but that’s just fine with me. Thanks for reminding me to renew my membership

From: ryanrc
28-Dec-18
I don't see anything wrong with being trad only. Nor do i see anything wrong with excluding crossbows from an organization of mostly compound shooters. Your club, your rules. I hate that people in clubs are forced to include for inclusion sake. It is forced and b.s.

From: BenP
28-Dec-18
Well said by many above including Pat. I’ve been a member for around 21 years ( joined when I was 16?) Probably still in the younger group of members at 37. PBS has brought value beyond words to my life via the lifelong friends I’ve developed. That said, I initially met some of those folks way back when right here on the Bowsite. It never hurts to join and try it out. You just never know who you’ll meet and how it will change your life.

From: Dave Lay
28-Dec-18
Ive been a PBS regular for a lot of years, but one of the quiet majority I believe in that I rarely express my opinion on a public forum , and won’t get into it much here but this seems to be headed into a equipment debate. I can’t really add to what Matt, Preston, Alan and others have very well said in support of the PBS, but my own two cents is that I do shoot hunting weight Trad gear, sharpen my own broadheads and build my own arrows, but I do it because I get a lot of personal satisisfaction from it and this equipment works for me and has been proven over the years. I have encouraged more than one friend to possibly move from his trad gear to a sensible compound . These guys were shooting trad but really shouldn’t be hunting with it in my opinion. They didn’t desire to shoot long distance but could just never get acceptable hunting accuracy even at close ranges.I hunt with friends who shoot compounds and are some of the most ethical hunters I know. All shoot sensible modern equipment and hunting weight arrows at stickbow ranges. To me it’s the modern equipment bowhunters shooting all the bells and gadgets and shooting long yardage , is what can affect kill number percentages and possibly affect our seasons, that concerns me, among other things. We now have the scoped cross bow entered in the equation. All that said to say I’m a very proud PBS member but the day it goes full Traditional Is the day I will have to leave , it’s not why I joined the PBS and It’s just not what the PBS is about in my opinion. Compton , of which I am a charter member, and our state Trad club of which I’m a founding and life member is in place to support strictly the Trad guy. I’m also a life member of the Ar Bowhunters assn. which I believe represents all bowhunters in the state. There’s a place for all inclusive as well as trad organizations . The PBS is about a whole lot more than trad vs compounds

29-Dec-18
Dave Lay makes some great points. I too use a hunting weight compound, make my own arrows and sharpen my own broadheads.

I hunted many years with trad gear but I never was very good. A big part of being an ethical bow hunter is being deadly with your chosen weapon and that is why I use a compound. Confidence is most important. Some stick guys may call me lazy but I’ve seen too many stick guys (who like me) loved their gear but sux at proficiency in hunting situations. I hunt now with both trad guys and compound guys. We may kid around about our chosen gear but we hunt for the same reasons.

Very impressive to see so many PBS members addicted to Bowsite and posting. That tells me we all enjoy hearing about others success whether it’s us, our kids, wives or other people we engage in our passion.

There is one organization that represents the majority of us “serious ethical bow hunters” and that’s the P&Y Club. Many stickbow guys have left P&Y in the past and this thread tells me it’s time we all get together. Please consider rejoining if you’ve left and come to the convention in Omaha this April. If we interact with one another (beyond just forums) I believe we’ll find much in common and greater strength. See you all at the Convention and join us at the Bowsite “Meet & Greet” Friday from 3 to 5.

From: Forester
30-Dec-18
I first joined the PBS as an associate member in about 1980 after meeting various PBS members while hunting in Colorado on a trip I won from Bowhunter Magazine. They were some of the nicest and most ardent and passionate bowhunters you can imagine. After a few years I lapsed as college, marriage, family and career intervened. I rejoined in the mid-90's and always enjoyed the magazine but had no interaction with PBS members and again allowed membership to lapse. I rejoined again about three years ago and my only interactions with members has been in selling or trading gear but the new and improved website has afforded an opportunity to learn more about the members, the organization and its goals. It is a superb group of dedicated bowhunters who of course have strong opinions and heartfelt convictions. There is such a paucity of those type of convictions today that even though I might not share all of them or every particular degree of their application to bowhunting I very much admire their free articulation.

The PBS members I've met have been refreshingly helpful, friendly, encouraging and engaging folks. One PBS member interested in buying a tree stand I had mentioned in a PBS classified thread called me and in an extended conversation invited me to participate in a future hog hunt. He also gave me all kinds of seasoned and experienced advice on bowhunting strategies, bow building, tree saddles, shooting techniques.... This is apparently "par for the course" with PBS members.

I fully intend to participate in future PBS hunt (s) and to attend the next banquet. Give them a try and I am confident you will be glad you did.

From: stykshooter
30-Dec-18
I first joined the P.B.S. in 1983 and became a regular member in about 1989. Been a continuous member since and have no intentions of ever letting my membership lapse. I could go on about the benefits of the P.B.S. but it has all pretty much been stated above. I just want to make a comment from a different perspective... Giving back instead of asking what an organization can do for me.

I have always been active in my state and local archery organizations and have attended numerous P.B.S. members hunts in several states. This past season I decided to try and host a hunt myself on public land here in Virginia. It was one of the best hunting experiences that I have ever had! It was a bit of work planning the hunts and keeping all the guys fed but it was just a great time sharing a week with like minded, serious bowhunters. I think I had about 15 guys through camp that week, two of them shooting compounds. We shared campfires, meals, late night blood trails and celebratory toasts and no one shunned anyone for the equipment that they chose. While I think everyone had a good time, I am sure that I was the one who benefited from the experience the most. I have hunted those same mountains for 50 years now, but having that group of serious, experienced bowhunters in camp that week just added to the whole experience for me. I have done numerous "gang" hunts before but to have P.B.S. members from around the country in camp was a decidedly different experience. While on the face of it I was the one giving back, in reality I am sure I am the one who reaped the most enjoyment from the week. Something I wouldn't have had the opportunity to do if I wasn't a member of the P.B.S.

10-Jan-19
PBS has been a positive experience for me. I don't want to beat a dead horse and most of my sentiments have been stated previously. I've been an associate member since 2009. The members (complete strangers) have always reached out to help when hunting new areas.

I will say it's a n organization that is fluid and has made many changes for the better since my joining. Anyone that has a bad taste about something that happened a long time ago is only doing themselves a disservice not checking back in to see if the organization is a better fit these days.

From: COHOYTHUNTER
10-Jan-19
Maybe the PBS would be a good organization to provide some additional help with what is happening in Colorado right now.

From: primitve
12-Jan-19
I'm not one Bowsite much anymore, but enjoy it when I do get on. I have donated hunts to the PBS bi-annual banquets since the late 90's (Seattle), with the exception of the Madison banquet. I have also been at quite a few banquets, and have always enjoyed my time there. PBS is a group of dedicated bowhunters who are primarily trad shooters, and are proud of it. But the compound folks fit right in and have just as much say. Its a tight knit group, as a newcomer you need to be assertive at the banquets to meet people because its like a huge family reunion when you show up. One thing you won't see at the events is selfie sticks, people vlogging, Instagram "influencers" trying to be seen and heard, or podcasts being done in every spare room in the hotel. That is rare these days. This group of fine folks are old school bowhunters who love the sport not for notoriety from others, but because they love God's creation and bowhunting the critters that live in it. Those that wanted it to be trad only are good friends of mine, but they are from a different era. Some of them have never seen the various social media circus sites, and never will. But are good people. I haven't gone to a banquet in a few years, but will be from now on (and donating). Respecting the animal you hunt is critical with this organization. Our hunting world of "self promotion", sponsorships, notoriety, likes, and followers is out of control. PBS is different, its old school and its real people who love fair chase and community with like minded folks. For the price of an average bottle of bourbon you can join, money well spent!

From: Thumper-tx
12-Jan-19
I was a Regular member of PBS in the early 80's but dropped my membership by around 1990. The compound bashing was unrelenting. From some of the post above, perhaps there is a bit of movement toward tolerance. I see they dropped their bow weight requirement which shows some progress. I would be curious what their membership numbers are now as opposed to the past. If the present membership is, as stated, 97% Trad then I can safely say that recruitment of compound shooters is not a very high priority of PBS.If it was much of a priority at all, the percentages wound not be THAT lopsided. As for me, I shoot both and hunt with both.

From: lawdy
12-Jan-19
I am one of many, I bet, who has hunted with trad gear for over 50 years but never could afford to join an organization that has banquets and hunts in far off states. There has never been a traditional bow club within 100 miles of me. There are just a couple of us up here that hunt with longbows or recurves, so we just hunt. We gab when we run into each other and that is about it. We are loners when we hunt.

12-Jan-19
lawdy you would fit right in up here,,,, ha ha

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