Sitka Mountain Gear
Repairing Ruts on Trails
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
ironmike 13-Feb-19
Shortstop 13-Feb-19
Bake 13-Feb-19
WV Mountaineer 13-Feb-19
ironmike 13-Feb-19
ironmike 13-Feb-19
Hans 1 13-Feb-19
Franklin 13-Feb-19
Mark Watkins 13-Feb-19
ironmike 13-Feb-19
Buff 13-Feb-19
Windmill 13-Feb-19
Deerplotter 13-Feb-19
LKH 13-Feb-19
Mad Trapper 14-Feb-19
ironmike 14-Feb-19
ironmike 26-Feb-19
WV Mountaineer 26-Feb-19
ironmike 26-Feb-19
Dennis Razza 26-Feb-19
LKH 26-Feb-19
From: ironmike
13-Feb-19
My side by side has created deep ruts on the trails to my plots. I'm an idiot for running those trails in the winter and when it's wet, but that's water under the bridge. Any suggestions for repairing those other than paying a fortune to bring in stones? I have a tractor with a bucket if that's useful. Because the trails are in the woods, I don't have perpendicular access to the ruts. I'm new to this, and appreciate any advice.

From: Shortstop
13-Feb-19
Tip the bucket down, lower to the depth you want, and back up.

From: Bake
13-Feb-19
Box blade on the tractor will do the trick. We fixed some pretty heavy tractor ruts with box blade at times

13-Feb-19
If there’s elevation there, then a dozer to drain the road is the answer. If not, your bucket loaded with shale is the next best thing. However, leaving the water in the ruts will see maintinence nessecary forever. So, be smart when you use it. Wet equals more sinking if you use it.

From: ironmike
13-Feb-19
Thanks guys. The trails aren't wide enough to get a dozer in, so I guess I need a box blade.

From: ironmike
13-Feb-19
Do I need a box blade with the cutters, etc., or will a blade itself do?

From: Hans 1
13-Feb-19
A small box blade and loader should do the trick. Teeth or scarifiers would help.if the area is small in length you could fill with dirt/clay to bring up the grade. Or if is real wet and you need this trail cut small 6-8 inch trees and lay perpendicular to the trail cover this with landscape fabric or old carpet and then dirt on top of that many areas were logged this way in the old days.

From: Franklin
13-Feb-19
If you do not grind up those ruts they will never go away. As mentioned....drainage and maintenance is the key. Driving on muddy trails is just creating work for yourself and possibly big $$$$ to fix.

From: Mark Watkins
13-Feb-19
cut and lay some small green logs down to stabilize your lowest areas....

Mark

From: ironmike
13-Feb-19
thanks guys

From: Buff
13-Feb-19
If you have access to wood chips, just fill the ruts with them. They are not heavy, so you can haul a bunch at a time, and a side by side is light enough, to not just push them in the ground.

From: Windmill
13-Feb-19
3” rock get a load with front tractor bucket, ask a hunting partner or two to help ya and throw the stone into the ruts only and it will last for years. Also straddle the ruts and this might every smooth or flatten out your trails as well.

From: Deerplotter
13-Feb-19
Get some thick rough cut oak slabs from a mill. Bury them in the ruts one on top the other. Use the tractor tires to push them down.

From: LKH
13-Feb-19
Before you put chips or other wood in the ruts, remember they fill with water and wood floats, even oak after a dry summer.

How long are these ruts???

From: Mad Trapper
14-Feb-19
Mike we have been dealing with this issue for years. It is all about water management. You need to get the water to drain from the rutted area. If you don't, absent filling with rock, you will never improve it. Find the low spot and cut a drain path for the water to go. We have had to actually dig a low spot beside the trail to form a low area for the water to go. We have used our tractor buckets to dig in some places, but I have generally found that using a shovel and mattock works just as well to form a drain path. Once you give the water a path to drain, the rutted areas will dry and you can smooth them out with the bucket. Then it is just a matter of keeping the drain paths open and free of leaves and debris. You can use a box blade to level out the ruts, but unless you deal with the water issue, you will never get the problem solved.

From: ironmike
14-Feb-19
OH, they are long, because I have teenage daughters who abuse the crap out of the quads!

From: ironmike
26-Feb-19
Again, apologies for the dumb question, but do I wait until the trails are completely dry to hit them with the blade, or should I do that while they are still semi-soft from the snow?

26-Feb-19
Do what Mad Trapper said. If it’s wet, you can rough it in with the blade. But, there will have to be a little handwork to get it draining well. But, get the water out. Everything else will be easy after that.

From: ironmike
26-Feb-19
Again, apologies for the dumb question, but do I wait until the trails are completely dry to hit them with the blade, or should I do that while they are still semi-soft from the snow?

From: Dennis Razza
26-Feb-19
Mike, Wait for the ground to dry a bit so you don't create more ditches. Like Mad Trapper said you need to put drain ditches in or every spring you'll be fixing the road again. Good luck.

From: LKH
26-Feb-19
I think the first problem you must deal with is the girls on the quads. Oh that should be easy!!!!!

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