Mathews Inc.
Antelope in red wine reduction sauce
Pronghorn
Contributors to this thread:
Jim Moore 26-Feb-19
Predeter 26-Feb-19
WV Mountaineer 26-Feb-19
dingo 26-Feb-19
Jaquomo 27-Feb-19
Jaquomo 27-Feb-19
Jim Moore 27-Feb-19
roseforyou 08-Aug-23
walking buffalo 08-Aug-23
bad karma 09-Aug-23
Zbone 09-Aug-23
RavenRidge 10-Aug-23
RavenRidge 10-Aug-23
From: Jim Moore
26-Feb-19
Made this up last night and it is fantastic and very easy. I would suggest taking the antelope out of the freezer a couple of days before cooking or at least defrost it so you can have at least one whole day to let it "bleed" out. Knocks out some of the gamey-ness in my opinion. I season it about an hour before cooking.

Antelope Sirloin with a Simple Red Wine Reduction

Who said butter is bad for you? There’s nothing better than cooking a steak in butter in a hot cast iron skillet. So to pay tribute to the last sirloin from my antelope, I wanted to fry it up with some fresh thyme, some butter and a quick and simple red wine reduction sauce.

INGREDIENTS

1 Antelope Sirloin (double the recipe if you are cooking 2) I used backstrap 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder Fresh thyme 3 tablespoons butter 1/2 cup red wine

DIRECTIONS

Season antelope with salt, pepper, garlic powder and fresh thyme. Cover with plastic wrap and marinade for 30 minutes to an hour. Remove from refrigerator and bring to room temperature for about 30 minutes.

Heat 2 tablespoons of butter in a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Make sure your skillet is hot. Add sirloin and cook on each side for 3-5 minutes. You want to be sure to thoroughly sear the outside of your sirloin. You can always us the finger test to check the doneness of your sirloin. I like my sirloin like I like my Tri-Tip, medium rare. Remove from skillet and set aside to rest.

Pour red wine into the skillet and turn the heat to high. Boil until it is reduced by 3/4, about 5-7 minutes. Turn off the heat and wait until the wine has stopped bubbling add the 1 tablespoon of butter. Season with salt and pepper if needed. Slice your antelope sirloin into small medallions and spoon red wine reduction on top. Enjoy.

From: Predeter
26-Feb-19
Sounds delicious, gonna have to try this!

26-Feb-19
How thick is the sirloin you are cooking? 3-5 minutes/side, letting it rest 8-10 minutes, and medium rare don't seem to compute. It has to be a lot thicker then I cut them. Just wandering.

Anyway, it sounds delicious!

From: dingo
26-Feb-19
Great recipe. You can tighten up your sauce with a little slurry made from cornstarch and water. (If you add the cornstarch straight, if will create lumps.)

A little dijon mustard in your marinade will also help with some of the gamey taste.

From: Jaquomo
27-Feb-19
Great recipe. I'm going to try it sous vide to get it true medium rare. Thanks for posting that.

From: Jaquomo
27-Feb-19

From: Jim Moore
27-Feb-19

Jim Moore's Link
Here is the link to the site I got it from. Nevada Foodies is a terrific site for most game meat. Nice pictures, recipes, comments and tweaks.

Justin, like most game meat I cook, antelope cooks pretty fast. I found the the best way to prepare game is to leave the thawed steak or backstrap or roasts that I cook covered and out for at least 4 hours and preferably longer if possible... say 8 hours or so. It bleeds out well and the meat seems to be more tender and flavorful. Thin cuts cook very fast so keep poking on them until you can feel them start to firm up a bit. I cook them on very high heat if possible to sear the outside quickly. On thicker cuts, sear them good and either use a thermometer on them or cook in the oven. I have had the soux vide style with venison and it is amazing. Those you cook to your taste then sear them. Would love to hear about Jaquomos try at it.

https://www.nevadafoodies.com/antelope-sirloin/

From: roseforyou
08-Aug-23
Wow, your antelope in red wine reduction sauce sounds absolutely amazing! I totally agree that the right sauce can elevate any dish, and it's awesome how you've put together such a flavorful recipe. Speaking of sauces, I recently discovered the best jar of alfredo sauce that's a total game-changer for pasta dishes. Creamy goodness all the way! If you're interested, you should check it out at beststorebought.com.

Keep experimenting with your cooking, and I'll definitely give your antelope recipe a try sometime. Thanks for sharing, and happy cooking!

08-Aug-23
This recipe almost does it.

Drink the wine, then use Port along with shallots for the reduction.

I've made many friends with this dish.

From: bad karma
09-Aug-23
Some cherries in the reduction can add quite a bit, too...

From: Zbone
09-Aug-23
I've only killed one Pronghorn and it tasted like sage, all of it... Worst tasting wild meat I ever ate and can't imagine anything could have made it taste good....

From: RavenRidge
10-Aug-23
It's true that marinating meat with mustard will help with the gamey flavor. Mustard and vinegar are oxidizers and will help break down the BCFA compounds in the meat( it works even better with lamb)

An easy variation on the red wine reduction is to sear off your meat, pull it and allow it to rest. While that's happening caramelized a good amount of sliced shallots or onion in the pan, then add your wine and thyme to deglaze and reduce by at least 1/2 being careful not to boil it...just let it simmer..boiling wine can make it bitter. Then add in the juices from the resting meat and butter( a little dijon works wonders here as well)...swirl the pan over the heat until the butter is melted. Then spoon the red wine/shallot redux over the meat.

Like Walking Buffalo said...Port is a good option as well. Even better is to have some good strong Demi made and stored in your freezer ;-)

From: RavenRidge
10-Aug-23

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