Moultrie Products
2019 Food Plot Seed Review!
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Pat Lefemine 07-Mar-19
great white 07-Mar-19
dm/wolfskin 07-Mar-19
BOHUNTER09 07-Mar-19
shorty 07-Mar-19
Charlie Rehor 08-Mar-19
BullBuster 08-Mar-19
Butternut40 08-Mar-19
Grey Ghost 08-Mar-19
t-roy 08-Mar-19
JTV 08-Mar-19
happygolucky 08-Mar-19
BullBuster 08-Mar-19
Hiker 08-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 08-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 08-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 08-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 08-Mar-19
Mark Watkins 08-Mar-19
t-roy 08-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 08-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 08-Mar-19
JSW 09-Mar-19
JSW 09-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 10-Mar-19
Mark Watkins 10-Mar-19
sagittarius 11-Mar-19
JSW 11-Mar-19
Grey Ghost 11-Mar-19
GeeJDubya 14-Mar-19
kam0327 15-Mar-19
APauls 15-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 15-Mar-19
BullBuster 24-Mar-19
Deerplotter 24-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 24-Mar-19
Pat Lefemine 24-Mar-19
Deerplotter 24-Mar-19
BullBuster 24-Mar-19
PopPop 10-Apr-19
PopPop 10-Apr-19
t-roy 10-Apr-19
Pat Lefemine 11-Apr-19
BOHUNTER09 13-Apr-19
BullBuster 13-Apr-19
DIY 14-Apr-19
Missouribreaks 14-Apr-19
Missouribreaks 14-Apr-19
Missouribreaks 14-Apr-19
BullBuster 15-Apr-19
bighorn 18-Apr-19
Pat Lefemine 19-Apr-19
From: Pat Lefemine
07-Mar-19

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Check out our 2019 Results!
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Check out our 2019 Results!

Pat Lefemine's Link
Check out our 2019 Annual Food Plot seed review! We had some very interesting results this year including some real surprises.

From: great white
07-Mar-19
Your deer should all be fat and happy.

From: dm/wolfskin
07-Mar-19
Pat, a few years back while working in research at University of Georgia I would get some silver queen corn off the stalks and just field corn and take down to where I hunted. The deer didn't eat the sweet corn but liked the field corn. The pigs eventually eat all of it which the pigs was what I was after.

From: BOHUNTER09
07-Mar-19
I really enjoyed reading this review of various plots. Gave me a few ideas for mine

From: shorty
07-Mar-19
Thanks for the review. I know now what I will be planting this spring.

08-Mar-19
Incredible amount of work. Passion comes threw big time!

Hope you kill a giant New York Bear!!

From: BullBuster
08-Mar-19
Interesting about the B trefoil. Much better early deer activity than I expected.

From: Butternut40
08-Mar-19
Great review. Good to know the trefoil did well in moist soil. I may give that a try this year.

From: Grey Ghost
08-Mar-19
Has anyone successfully grown the Alfagraze 300 on non-irrigated dry land in Colorado? I've tried 2 different alfalfa strains with limited results. Growth was spotty at best, and the native grasses and weeds quickly took over. I'm certainly no farmer, so my results could easily be from lack of know-how.

I have apporx. 10 acres to plant in central Colorado. It's mostly native grasses, with sparse patches of cactus and yucca plants. I've tried alfalfa, corn. winter wheat, and oats in past years. The oats grew the best, the deer loved it early on, and turkeys were all over it after it seeded out. But I'm looking for a perennial solution for my plot, since I don't wish to plant every year.

Any advice is welcomed.

Matt

From: t-roy
08-Mar-19
Great info, Pat.

Curious about the Blackhawk clover. You stated it is an annual, but they said something about it reseeding itself. Do they think it will reestablish itself, or, will you possibly have to go in and frost seed into the plot to try and thicken it up, or replant it each year?

I’m a fan of the Real World beans as well. Planted some of the Northern blend and the Gen2 variety, side by side last year. I couldn’t see any preference by the deer for one vs the other, however, the Gen2 beans do hold the matured beans in the pods much better than the northern blend (which is the main selling point of the Gen2 beans). Frankly, I’m not all that concerned about having the shatter resistance factor due to the fact the deer have all my beans eaten by early January anyway. Have you tried the Gen2 beans in your plots yet?

From: JTV
08-Mar-19
Pat, you mention the Birdsfoot Trefoil, back when I had my private land lease and was doing plots, I found a few bags of a clover/Trefoil mix by an over the counter company, which I cant remember the name... for the few years I had that particular mix, it was one of the best performing plots I had ... those doing plantings should look at the Trefoil ..

From: happygolucky
08-Mar-19
Great stuff Pat. Very interesting on the trefoil. When I first started plotting, many people told me to stay away from it because once it got going, it was hard to kill. I have a spot that gets wet spring and fall and the trefoil would have wet feet. I think I will give it a whirl this year.

From: BullBuster
08-Mar-19
I’m definitely doing a mix of BT with Alsike clover in my wet areas this year. Very helpful

From: Hiker
08-Mar-19
I was wondering if you have active food plots from previous years on the property and what type of activity you saw in comparison to location and plant type for 2019. For example if you have another type of clover how did it compare to the Blackhawk and if the Blackhawk was near some other older plot what was the usage of both? Thank you for doing these reviews it is very interesting to see the different types of plots. I wished mine looked as good these.

From: Pat Lefemine
08-Mar-19
Hiker, no. I burned down all of my perennial plots this year. It was time. I got 7 years out of my durana plot, 4 years on my ladino. But it was becoming a battle.

From: Pat Lefemine
08-Mar-19
T-roy. On your blackhawk question...no idea. I am purposely not going to frost seed it. Partially because we have 3' of snow up there right now. But I also want to see if it actually does reseed itself. It was very impressive growth with good utilization. It's pretty stemy, like mammoth red clover is.

I have tried Gen2 beans. I honestly could not tell the difference.

From: Pat Lefemine
08-Mar-19
Grey Ghost, 10 acres of Alfagraze is not going to be cheap. Likely north of $2500. It's good stuff but hard to justify if your just planting for deer.

From: Pat Lefemine
08-Mar-19
If you guys haven't seen it yet, check out the photo page. Some really cool photos in there from my drone, and other shots. I shot a video of me liming that is just awesome.

From: Mark Watkins
08-Mar-19
Pat, Great information passed on...lots of work!

I'm very interested in the ongoing followup on the Blackhawk Clover as well..Keep us posted.

I've had great results (west central MN) with Real World Beans - Northern Variety as well!! Pod production, shatter resistance, grazing pressure and growth rate to achieve canopy have all been fantastic.

The bad news is an Invasive...water hemp in particular that is roundup resistant. This year I am "forced" to go with Liberty beans and Liberty link chemical to mix up my chemical makeup to deal with this issue.

Maybe I missed it...Pat, what type of seeder are you currently using to plant your plots (and what kind of soil prep..disking, fertilizing, row spacing)?

Mark

From: t-roy
08-Mar-19
Did you mow the Blackhawk clover any over the course of the summer?

From: Pat Lefemine
08-Mar-19
Mark, For my corns, sorghum, and beans I used a JD-71 4-row planter with the appropriate plate. For my trefoil, clover, brassicas, and alfalfa I used my Woods precision seeder.

From: Pat Lefemine
08-Mar-19
T-roy. No, I never mowed the blackhawk. I really didn't need to as it was lush, relatively weed free and had good activity.

From: JSW
09-Mar-19
Great information. Thanks Pat.

Now if you would just replicate this experiment in central Kansas where we only get about 30" of rain, that would be great.

I've gotten tons of good advice from people on this forum.

From: JSW
09-Mar-19
Pat, I have a question about the Alfagraze. When Round up ready alfalfa first came out you weren't allowed to use it in food plots. They didn't want any of it to mature enough to go to seed. I have some RR alfalfa that we bail regularly, which works great. It comes back quickly and I don't bale it very late in the season so it goes into winter about 3/4 grown. I've never dealt with grazing alfalfa. Do you have to mow it or do you just rely on the deer to keep it down so it's not too mature and stemmy? Can you give us a little more info on this? Thanks

From: Pat Lefemine
10-Mar-19
I mowed it once last season. The deer couldn’t keep up.

From: Mark Watkins
10-Mar-19
Pat, 10-4 on the planting equipment.

The Alphagraze alfalfa results were very positive! I've got a little .8 acre piece that it would work well in to take the pressure of the beans.

Mark

From: sagittarius
11-Mar-19

sagittarius's Link
JSW, "When Round up ready alfalfa first came out you weren't allowed to use it in food plots. They didn't want any of it to mature enough to go to seed."

Nothing has changed. The Technology Use Guide still says ... "Planting Limitation: Grower must not plant Roundup Ready Alfalfa in any wildlife feed plots,". Same for RR Canola, and RR Sugarbeets. The question is, will Monsanto or Bayer ever attempt to enforce it?

http://tug.monsanto.com/

From: JSW
11-Mar-19
Thanks guys. Very informative.

When the RR beans first came out Monsanto sued farmers into bankruptcy over breach of contract. It was a big deal 6 or 8 years ago but you don't hear about it so much anymore. I certainly don't want to be the food plot guy that they make an example out of.

I have some planted but it's a large enough field to warrant bailing. I'm planning to plant 12 acres on another property this fall. If I only planted one thing, it would be alfalfa. It is about as good year round as you can get and you can make some money off of it.

From: Grey Ghost
11-Mar-19
Pat,

The price of the Alfagraze doesn't concern me, as long as I'd get 2-3 good years out of one planting. I'm just not sure I have the proper soil/water conditions for alfalfa. All of the alfalfa around here is grown in creek bottoms that are either sprinkled or sub-irrigated. My plot relies on rain only.

I'll probably just plant oats, again, and call it good enough.

Matt

From: GeeJDubya
14-Mar-19
Excellent presentation and analysis!

From: kam0327
15-Mar-19
Question for you, Pat. Regarding the Real World beans, do you have any agricultural fields within close proximity of your food plots? I have planted forage beans in my plots in the past (Whitetail Institute) and sometimes it seems that I'm losing out when competing with the farmer's soybean fields a couple of hundred yards away. I guess my bottom line question is whether you have nearby bean fields as well? Thanks.

From: APauls
15-Mar-19
That's not farming. Those plots are works of art.

From: Pat Lefemine
15-Mar-19

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Sorghum. Sprayed pre-emergent and tilled, and planted with JD 71 planter. Top dressed at 12" with Urea.
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Sorghum. Sprayed pre-emergent and tilled, and planted with JD 71 planter. Top dressed at 12" with Urea.
Kam0327, There are no soybeans, corn, brassicas or virtually anything else within miles of my property. The nearest cornfield is probably 10 miles away.

What we do have is hay fields everywhere. My neighbors have hundreds of acres of hay fields that consist mainly of Timothy Grass and some clover mixed in. That's basically it for miles. One neighbor plants deer plots but they are pretty small and he has limited time to tend to them - plus he never sprays. So there's no comparison.

I spray, mow, fertilize, lime, and spend a good deal of time and money on my plots.

From: BullBuster
24-Mar-19
Pat, here is a suggestion for future plots. I’m planting some this year. Sainfoin. Compared to alfalfa it is non-bloating, even more attractive, grows earlier, stays green later, more drought tolerant and excellent pollinator. Disadvantages are slightly less tonnage over the growing season and doesn’t tolerate lower pH. It is glycoside resistant naturally. This is info I’ve read, not from experience, so take with a grain of salt.

From: Deerplotter
24-Mar-19
Wow that’s a pretty dang good looking field of Sorghum. Is the Sorghum a late season food source and what I mean by that is after the first hard freeze and consistent low freezing temps? Will it last a bit like large leaf brassica will do?

From: Pat Lefemine
24-Mar-19
Bullbuster, I'll check that out. I don't know much about Sanfoin, I've heard of it but that's about it. I'll have to check it out.

From: Pat Lefemine
24-Mar-19

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Sorghum plot Sept. 9th.
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Sorghum plot Sept. 9th.
DeerPlotter,

I can't answer your question about late winter use of Sorghum. It was untouched until November and wiped out in two weeks. I would say it was more attractive than Brassicas but I get a month or more from my bulb brassicas so I feel it's a better crop than sorgum for winter use. Plus, there is no stalk or residue to clean up.

From: Deerplotter
24-Mar-19
Does the Birdsfoot Treefoil seed have to be inoculated before seeding?

From: BullBuster
24-Mar-19
Yes

From: PopPop
10-Apr-19
Looking to put a few food plots in this year. Area/woods are mostly shaded. What would be the correct seed for this type deer food plot. White cover? Any help or tips would be great.

From: PopPop
10-Apr-19
Looking to put a few food plots in this year. Area/woods are mostly shaded. What would be the correct seed for this type deer food plot. White cover? Any help or tips would be great.

From: t-roy
10-Apr-19
First, I would definitely recommend getting a soil sample first of all. Clover and/or rye would probably be your best bets.

Can you cut any trees down or, at least, trim some branches out to open up the canopy some? Clover does pretty good in partial shade, but several hours of sunlight will definitely help.

From: Pat Lefemine
11-Apr-19
t-Roy x2

From: BOHUNTER09
13-Apr-19
I did some research on Sanfoin It’s pretty slow to get established. Some say that it’s best to start with a cover crop to reduce weed competition. As for glyphosate resistance, it does show resistance to very low doses of glyphosate, but so does clover. Tonnage is also less than alfalfa or clover. If allowed to bloom, it’s better for pollinators. Overall, not enough positives for me.

From: BullBuster
13-Apr-19
I’m planting 2 ac Sainfoin and 2 ac of alfalfa within a couple hundred yards of each other If I can ever get any equipment into my property. I’ll let y’all know how they compare.

From: DIY
14-Apr-19
I'm struggling to understand how you got such great growth and utilization out of an annual clover during Sep and Oct. When in 2018 was the Blackhawk arrowleaf clover planted? Also, did it come inoculated from Hancock?

14-Apr-19
Sainfoin is an excellent deer attractor, better than alfalfa for sure. Prone to root rot in wet soils.

14-Apr-19
Alfalfa produces more tonnage, and is hardier than Sainfoin. In contiguous fields, virtually 99 % of the deer will be feeding on Sainfoin. And yes, Sainfoin is great for pollinators.

14-Apr-19
This is an excellent and informative thread.

From: BullBuster
15-Apr-19
Another couple things about Sainfoin. It starts up earlier and actually produces more in the first cutting than alfalfa, but does not recover from cuttings as fast, so yearly tonnage is less. The earliness is important for deer recovery from winter. It also requires less fertilizer, and is more resistant to disease; although not root rot as stated. Bales are safer to provide as supplemental feed in winters because it is non-bloating.

From: bighorn
18-Apr-19
Pat what do you believe would be a better plot Durana white clover, Hancocks killer clover mix, or the blackhawk clover. Thanks

From: Pat Lefemine
19-Apr-19
Depends what your objective is. Blackhawk is a reseeding annual and Durana is an aggressive perennial. Not sure what’s in the Hancock mix. I don’t consider durana as attractive as ladino but if you have high deer numbers and you want a perennial then durana gets the nod.

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