KUIU
Must have gear for Alaska moose
Moose
Contributors to this thread:
Hessticles 28-Mar-19
altitude sick 28-Mar-19
t-roy 28-Mar-19
Adak Caribou 28-Mar-19
MQQSE 28-Mar-19
cnelk 28-Mar-19
cnelk 28-Mar-19
Buskill 28-Mar-19
Kevin Dill 28-Mar-19
LKH 28-Mar-19
elkmo 28-Mar-19
TEmbry 29-Mar-19
altitude sick 29-Mar-19
altitude sick 29-Mar-19
altitude sick 29-Mar-19
altitude sick 29-Mar-19
cnelk 29-Mar-19
altitude sick 29-Mar-19
APauls 29-Mar-19
Hessticles 29-Mar-19
M.Pauls 29-Mar-19
BIGHORN 29-Mar-19
Mule Power 29-Mar-19
Tdvorak 29-Mar-19
TEmbry 30-Mar-19
Tdvorak 30-Mar-19
Tdvorak 30-Mar-19
M.Pauls 30-Mar-19
Tdvorak 30-Mar-19
cnelk 30-Mar-19
Kevin Dill 30-Mar-19
JDECK 30-Mar-19
Tdvorak 30-Mar-19
JayZ 30-Mar-19
cnelk 31-Mar-19
Scar Finga 31-Mar-19
LKH 31-Mar-19
carcus 31-Mar-19
Hawkeye 31-Mar-19
From: Hessticles
28-Mar-19
I elk hunt every year so have a lot of gear, but looking for must haves for Alaska moose. It will be a drop camp so we don’t have to worry about tent, stove etc. I have a kuiu chugach nx rain coat not sure if it’ will do or not… hip boots or knee high? Brands?

28-Mar-19

altitude sick's embedded Photo
Pants with knee pads are nice around camp when out of the waders and not wanting to kneel on a wet sponge
altitude sick's embedded Photo
Pants with knee pads are nice around camp when out of the waders and not wanting to kneel on a wet sponge
We were glad we took a quality Siltarp with trekking poles. A basic blue tarp won’t keep you dry and are noisy. Take your own quality pack frame.

From: t-roy
28-Mar-19
Are you going to be based on a river or lake with access to a boat or raft? If so, I’d recommend bringing a pair of easy to slip on and off rubber coated gloves. We were on a river with a boat and every time we would tie up, our good hunting gloves would get gritty, grimey and slimey from the rope. We brought a pair with us, and they worked great, but they disappeared on the second day of the hunt :-(

EDIT: I’d definitely recommend getting them in blaze orange, too!

From: Adak Caribou
28-Mar-19
I foresee you getting many opinions on gear/gadgets. :) I hunt in mountains where I can really see and not much for swamps and the streams are knee deep - For boots I use tall waterproof leather boots, Wyoming saw, heavy duty x-large game bags, bug dope, Kuiu Chugach will work great, spotting scope, bino's, heavy duty pack, knife sharpener or many replaceable blades, usually very cold mornings and then warmer during day so good insulation while glassing early, moose call of some sort............basically what you use for elk hunting. Have a great time.

From: MQQSE
28-Mar-19
I love a lightweight screened in gazebo for sitting around camp when bugs are bad. It can keep a person sane when in camp.

From: cnelk
28-Mar-19

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
You’ll use a couple of these more than you can imagine

From: cnelk
28-Mar-19

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo

From: Buskill
28-Mar-19
A small come along can be a lifesaver. Obviously need a quality rope to go with it . I hunted mostly in waist high waders. I agreed with cnelk in the pully wheels.

From: Kevin Dill
28-Mar-19
Ibuprofen. Plastic ratchet pruner. Z-Seat. Smoke in a Bottle. Mousetraps.

From: LKH
28-Mar-19
Crocs or something similar.

From: elkmo
28-Mar-19
Bug suit top or net for your head or your face will look like a Naked and Afraid contestants bitten arse. Benadryl cream for the bites.

From: TEmbry
29-Mar-19
Too many variables based on landscape of hunting area and type of trip planned.

29-Mar-19
If your going to mess with the weight of pulleys, look up how to build a “Z DRAG” system used for cravasse rescue. They sell cheat sheets with a diagram. Build a 5-1 with 3 blocks or 6-1 with 4 blocks. Or buy lightweight 2-3 sheave blocks for more mechanical advantage. If you use 2 blocks incorrectly it’s Not worth the weight.

29-Mar-19

altitude sick's embedded Photo
altitude sick's embedded Photo

29-Mar-19

altitude sick's embedded Photo
altitude sick's embedded Photo

29-Mar-19
Cheaper than mountaineering gear, look at aborists equipment suppliers like Wespur equipment. They sell high quality blocks and complete rigs. A little pricey. But it will give you the idea how to build your own out of cheaper non human lifting safety type gear.

From: cnelk
29-Mar-19

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
I used one pulley to lift/lower the food bags twice a day.

Definitely worth the weight

29-Mar-19
Definitely mouse poison or traps

From: APauls
29-Mar-19
Must have's for me are quality rain gear (which chugach is great), quality tent - a source of heat is a REAL bonus depending on the weather, waders, some sort of boat or device to remove or access dead moose in water, ingredients to make good food, and reading material.

You've got acres more time than elk hunting, so using the time to make a good meal is awesome. It would suck to sit there with acres of time to make something good, and then ruin your gut on non-stop freeze dried meals.

From: Hessticles
29-Mar-19
Awesome! Keep em coming guys!

From: M.Pauls
29-Mar-19
I buy a bunch of Paracord before going. On the last trip I bought a bulk roll and have enough for years. Use that crap for everything.

Like others have said a small come-along. Mine is called a pack mule, folds up and fits into like a small pistol-like hard case.

Kuiu Chugach rain gear has been dabomb, but I actually ripped a hole in my pant on a thorn last moose trip, reminds me i have to fix that.

Insulation. As in warm clothes. The first trip I shaved that part of my gear down and was cold. That sucks. Things like a blizzard Beenie from Sitka seem like overkill but when it’s freezing, it makes the hunt comfortable

From: BIGHORN
29-Mar-19
Rubber or rubber lined rain gear is the most important item on your list, same with the gloves. We took along a gallon of Coleman Fluid which was nice to start a fire when you are freezing your butt off and everything is too wet to start a fire. A fishing rod with lead head jig with No. 6 or 8 size hook (forget what they are called but have long black feathers). Bug spray, bug spray and more bug spray. Hand creme and a finger nail clipper.

From: Mule Power
29-Mar-19
Nothing ever dries when it’s always either raining or humid. Take a second pair of boots.

From: Tdvorak
29-Mar-19
It is a great idea to sign up for a course specifically dealing with UNGUIDED moose hunting in Alaska. They have a lot of valuable information. You will have a huge leg up on the hunters that don’t take a class which means your success will likely be much higher than the norm. The information they provide is coming from guides and NOT just theory from guys who have maybe only hunted moose 5-10 times in their life...or worse coming from somebody who maybe has only hunted zero times. A seasoned Alaska Moose Hunter will only bring 45-50 pounds of gear including their rifle. Less seasoned will want to bring 70-80. I hope you have an awesome trip! Good luck.

From: TEmbry
30-Mar-19
Where would a course on unguided moose hunting taught by guides be offered at?

Secondly, what is the correlation between moose hunting success and weight of camp gear flown in?

From: Tdvorak
30-Mar-19
There are some guides that do them over the phone, face to face or Skype. I’ve seen some amateurish ones printed in magazines that were worth about the same as the magazine shelf price of $5. It costs some money to do a class but the difference in success of the attendants is night and day. Google search some River Guide Services for Alaska hunting. Also search unguided moose hunting symposiums. You can also ask the outfitter you are considering of hiring to give you a 1-2 day class where he will go over the things that might not be obvious to you because you’ve never hunted moose before...or even if you have but your success rate isn’t as good as you wish it was. Moose population numbers are important to a certain degree but we all know guys that can find them where other hunters can’t. Many a DIY moose hunter has gone home disappointed claiming “the outfitter put me where there were no moose” simply because they didn’t see any moose. The symposiums and some guides will explain why some hunters don’t see moose when they are in the area. Other guides will keep it as a secret because it adds value to their profession. You can’t blame them for that. (Like if the mechanic doesn’t want to tell you how easy it is to adjust the timing.) The correlation between success and weight is a bit more complicated...not so black and white. But here is how some pro AK guides look at it: 1. The more weight/bulk a hunter shows up with the fewer places the bush plane can land because of the extra take-off and landing distance. 2. The more gear a hunter thinks is “necessary” tends to indicate the hunter’s skills are less. 3. The more gear a hunter thinks is “necessary” the less they tend to focus on mental toughness and adaptability, both essential for consistency of success. I hope I answered your questions. You can feel free to PM me anytime if you think my opinion is worth it.

From: Tdvorak
30-Mar-19

From: M.Pauls
30-Mar-19
Thomas, I’m sorry I don’t know you, so I’m honestly just curious, as I’ve never heard of “moose hunting classes.” Are you the one teaching these classes? I could see in any situation, a virgin to any particular species, it would be beneficial to spend an hour or two with an experienced guide. In all reality, it’s the same reason I come to the Bowsite.

From: Tdvorak
30-Mar-19
There are several that a person can take part in. There are more than “just one”. These forums have lots of misinformation and lots of great information at the same time. It is hard for a reader to tell the difference between good info, bad info and info that maybe applied to one situation but not any other. There are also some outfitters that will chat for a day or two to cover things that most moose hunters don’t know. The problem is we never know what we don’t know. ALL outfitters will answer every question you have but finding one that will predict what you don’t know (from experience of dealing with DIY hunters) is a huge benefit. I’ve literally watched moose hunters glass for days into a River they were hunting only to run into their pilot later that said they never saw a moose when I had seen moose right below them from my camp several miles away. Another time I’ve had hunters camped right on top (less than a half mile) of 3 big bulls and two cows for over a week that told me they never saw them. I knew these guys were really good hunters, just not good moose hunters. There is a subtle difference. I’ve seen so many similar situations and heard of so many more from hunters, guides and outfitters that it convinced me that a “diy moose hunting” course has a huge value. It isn’t something that I see a lot of people discuss fir several reasons.

From: cnelk
30-Mar-19
^^^^ Can you please point out all the ‘misinformation and bad info’?

Curious minds want to know.

From: Kevin Dill
30-Mar-19
As regards gear weight, what I've found is that good pilots put an absolute limit on their hunters and will not let them exceed that or bring more gear than they need. This is especially true with Super Cubs and other light craft flying tundra tires in hilly or mountainous terrain. A Beaver or other heavy hauler on floats is a different matter, and guys can easily bring 100 pounds or more per man typically. My gear load is typically NOT ultralight down to the ounces, but I don't abuse things. I don't go out there to crawl in and out of a bivy tent, hence my tipi and a woodstove. And a chair. Oh yes...cot and thick pad. Plenty of food. I definitely don't go out there to live under a lean-to and eat sedges. I'll be comfortable because my hunt is both a hunt and a vacation of sorts...even if I'm hunting solo. I'm gone from the tent at daybreak and my hunting day ends when it's too dark to shoot responsibly. I've often said that being well fed and comfortable makes me a better hunter. Good sleep, correct nutrition and the right gear keeps me hunting harder.

From: JDECK
30-Mar-19
I brought a pair of cut proof gloves to wear while butchering. It's a tiring process and the gloves are cheap and light weight.

From: Tdvorak
30-Mar-19
Cnelk, no I’m not going to insult anybody on here that posted misinformation. I’m not going to Single somebody out to snipe at them. Some posters do, and some poster seem to love it. I think I’m beyond that. I’m not here to insult but would like to help regular guys.

From: JayZ
30-Mar-19
Can you give me the name of someone who could teach me about unguided moose hunting?

From: cnelk
31-Mar-19
Tdvorak - we are big boys here. If there is mis-information as you stated, let's hear it.

Or dont bring it up

From: Scar Finga
31-Mar-19
If he will share his information, I believe Paul@thefort has experience doing this, so does some of the gentlemen at the top of this post as well as Tdvorak.

Get in touch with them and pick their brains!

From: LKH
31-Mar-19
Coleman fuel for fire starter was mentioned. It's too volatile and burns off too quickly. Mix half gas and half diesel and put in your coleman fuel can. Another choice that the planes take without issue is self starting charcoal. Easy to light and puts out heat for a long time to help dry your fuel.

From: carcus
31-Mar-19

carcus's embedded Photo
carcus's embedded Photo
Helley Hansen impertech! Inexpensive and so good, my sitka downpour stayed in the tent!

From: Hawkeye
31-Mar-19
That Helly Hansen saved me on a goat hunt as well. Good stuff!

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